QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Thursday, September 29th, 2022

Quad-City Times Community Action of Eastern Iowa to begin taking applications for energy assistance Quad-City Times

Community Action of Eastern Iowa to begin taking applications for energy assistance

Community Action of Eastern Iowa will begin accepting applications for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) starting Oct. 1 for households with elderly and/or disabled members. All other low-income households may apply beginning on Nov. 1. The last day…

Quad-City Times 51st annual CROP Hunger Walk to be held this weekend in Moline Quad-City Times

51st annual CROP Hunger Walk to be held this weekend in Moline

The 51st annual Quad Cities CROP Hunger Walk will take place Sunday, Oct. 2. The route will feature approximately 2.5 miles over the new Interstate 74 bridge from Moline to Bettendorf and back.

Wednesday, September 28th, 2022

WQAD.com WQAD.com

City of Davenport approves changing downtown streets to two-ways

The discussion resulted in a split vote to turn 3rd and 4th Streets into two-way roads.

WQAD.com City of Davenport approves changing downtown streets to two-ways WQAD.com

City of Davenport approves changing downtown streets to two-ways

The discussion resulted in a split vote to turn 3rd and 4th Streets into two-way roads.

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Coalition to Stop CO₂ Pipelines asks Knox County to intervene in state approval process

Two members of the Coalition to Stop CO₂ Pipelines presented their concerns about a proposed 1,300-mile carbon capture pipeline to the Knox County Board Wednesday.

WQAD.com Coalition to Stop CO₂ Pipelines asks Knox County to intervene in state approval process WQAD.com

Coalition to Stop CO₂ Pipelines asks Knox County to intervene in state approval process

Two members of the Coalition to Stop CO₂ Pipelines presented their concerns about a proposed 1,300-mile carbon capture pipeline to the Knox County Board Wednesday.

OurQuadCities.com Spotlight's 'The Producers' ready to unleash gay Hitler, dancing Nazis OurQuadCities.com

Spotlight's 'The Producers' ready to unleash gay Hitler, dancing Nazis

One of the most successful shows in Broadway history is coming to Moline’s Spotlight Theatre, and the usually family-friendly venue is warning some patrons. “KNOW BEFORE YOU GO! This show is written by Mel Brooks,” the Spotlight says on its website of the gleefully boundary-pushing comedy legend and the musical "The Producers." “If you are bringing children, I highly recommend you look into the appropriateness of the show. There is some language and a lot of innuendo.” "The Producers" features Max Robnett, left, Chris Tracy, Joel Kolander, Nancy Teerlinck and Brycen Witt. The four leads of the new “Producers” – which premiered in 2001 and swept the Tonys, winning a record 12 – can’t wait to be all about that innuendo. “I’ve been itching to do this since college,” Joel Kolander (who plays the wild director Roger De Bris in his Spotlight debut) said Tuesday. “I don’t enjoy the humor so much as everybody else’s reaction to it.” He cited the show’s most famous number, “Springtime for Hitler,” as the prime hilarious example. Kolander’s character – the gay, flamboyant, campy director -- is also a hoot. “On the echelon of shock humor, you have a gay Hitler. That’s about as good as it gets,” he said. “There are a lot of shocked faces in the audience.” Roger requires over-the-top comic acting, and needs to have one of the best and strongest voices in the show, according to a synopsis. Some people might come to see “The Producers” and not remember what’s in the supremely silly show, even if they are familiar with the title, Kolander said. “It swept the Tonys; it’s a big show,” Chris Tracy (a Spotlight veteran who plays Max Bialystock) said. “It was a big deal back then. The last time they did it in Chicago was 2019, before COVID. It was a reimagining of it.” QC Music Guild did it as their spring show in 2009. Oscar-winning film, record-breaking Tonys “The Producers” has music and lyrics by Mel Brooks (based on his Oscar-winning 1967 film starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder), and a book by Brooks and Thomas Meehan. The original Broadway production starred Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, opening in 2001, and won a record 12 Tony Awards ("Hamilton" later won 11). The story concerns two theatrical producers who scheme to get rich by fraudulently overselling interests in a Broadway flop. Complications arise when the show unexpectedly turns out to be successful. The humor of the show draws on ridiculous accents, caricatures of gay people and Nazis, and many show business in-jokes, according to a summary. The original Broadway production in 2001 starred Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick as Max and Leo, and ran for 2,502 performances, winning a record-breaking 12 Tony Awards. It was adapted into a 2005 film version. Chris Tracy is playing Max, and saw the original cast in Chicago (before Broadway) in 2001. “I’ve been a Mel Brooks fan for a long time,” he said Tuesday. Despite “The Producers” being Brooks’ first full musical, Tracy said the songs are incredible – with wit, humor and intelligence. The big number featuring old ladies with walkers includes Heather Jo Whan, left, Annie Huston, Becca Johnson, Christianna Crosby and Grace Wiborg. “Mel Brooks was a drummer when he started out, and everything he writes has its own rhythm,” he added. “That follows through to these songs. His wife, Anne Bancroft, basically forced him to turn this into a musical.” Many people recommended he turn the film into a musical. Tracy said Brooks originally wanted to call the movie “Springtime for Hitler,” but the studio made him change that (the only thing in the movie he had to change). Musical within a musical “Springtime for Hitler: A Gay Romp With Adolf and Eva at Berchtesgaden” is the fictional musical within “The Producers” (film and stage version). It’s a musical about the Nazi dictator, written by Franz Liebkind, an unbalanced ex-Nazi originally played by Kenneth Mars (and later by Brad Oscar and Will Ferrell in the stage musical and the 2005 film, respectively). Max Robnett, left, plays Leo, Noah Hill plays Franz, and Chris Tracy is Max. To ensure that the play in “The Producers” is a total failure, Max chooses this tasteless script (which he describes as "practically a love letter to Adolf Hitler"), and hires the worst director he can find (Roger DeBris), a stereotypical homosexual and transvestite caricature. The musical within a musical is described “as an equal opportunity offender: Jews are portrayed as so greedy they make merchandise out of Hitler, gay men are lispy and limp-wristed — and sexually depraved old women struggle to a sexual fling on their walkers,” according to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. The character Max is based on someone Brooks actually worked for, Tracy said. Tracy bases his portrayal more on Zero Mostel, the ‘60s Broadway star who had leads in “Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” and “Fiddler on the Roof.” “He was just iconic, so my thought process was, what if he were in the musical?” Tracy said. “Try to blend with a little homage here and there to Nathan Lane, but also try to do some of my own stuff up there, hoping it works.” It’s also the latest time he’s played a “Max” character – including in “The Sound of Music,” “Lend Me a Tenor” and “Moon Over Buffalo.” Max Robnett (center) with Annie Huston, left, Heather Jo Whan, Christianna Crosby, Haley Tromblee, and Kristen Marietta. His “Producers” co-star is actually a Max – Max Robnett (as Leo Bloom), who was also in “Sound of Music” at Spotlight, another musical with Nazis. “I was the sweetest Nazi in all of Austria,” Robnett said Tuesday, noting his next musical has to be “Cabaret,” also set against the backdrop of Nazis (in 1930s Berlin). He’s nervous about being a copycat of a nebbishy Matthew Broderick, and is confident he’s just different enough. “It’s not to emulate, especially when you have such iconic people playing such iconic roles,” Tracy said of the Broadway stars. “They were all so good. It was the perfect formula at the perfect time, so you have the desire to bring that same energy to the role, but at the same time, it’s not the Broadway show. It’s not the Off-Broadway show, or the Off-Off-Broadway show.” “We’re doing our version,” he said. “We have a few moments that are definitely our own.” “The Producers” features an ultimate odd couple, with Max and Leo. Max is described as the consummate con man, animated, bombastic, and frantic. Leo is the timid, naïve and meek accountant. “I’m naturally a neurotic, paranoid person, so playing an anxious person comes very naturally,” Robnett joked. He and Tracy are both big fans of the show. “He’s very knowledgeable about the show, so was very helpful,” Robnett said. “We were pretty much set to run on day one.” “Your jets were on at the read-through,” Kolander marveled. Having more fun as blonde Kirsten Sindelar is in her fourth Spotlight show – she has been in “The Wedding Singer,” “Little Shop of Horrors” and “The Lightning Thief.” She plays the Swedish blonde bombshell Ulla, after friends of hers recommended she try out. Kirsten Sindelar is Ulla Inga Hansen Benson Yonsen Tallen-hallen Svaden-svanson in "The Producers" at Moline's Spotlight Theatre. "I got it and I am having the best time,” Sindelar (a Circa ’21 Bootlegger) said. “I get to keep my blonde hair,” which the former brunette has had since February. Kolander is in his first Spotlight show, after several at Music Guild. He was in “Cats” with Sindelar, and was in “Jekyll & Hyde” and “Beauty and the Beast” at Guild. “Being half-Swedish helps a little bit,” Sindelar said of Ulla. Her highlight is during her entrance, right before intermission – kind of an audition song called “If You Got It, Flaunt It.” “It’s all the breath I can muster to get through it and dance,” Sindelar said. The Spotlight music director is Chad Schmertmann, and choreographer is Shana Kulhavy. An over-the-top style The former Scottish Rite Cathedral at 1800 7th Ave., Moline (which opened as the Spotlight in 2018) is definitely the largest stage and space Robnett has performed in, which affects the actors’ style. “This stage has a lot more freedom of movement,” he said. “You can play it to the back row here, definitely.” “And that fits the style of the show,” Sindelar said of its big, over-the-top nature. “Above and beyond is what it is.” A kick line features (from left) Kristen Marietta, Haley Tromblee, Max Robnett, Christianna Crosby, Heather Jo Whan, Annie Huston, and Grace Wiborg. “I’m excited it’s a larger space,” Kolander said. “All I want for Roger is this constant energy. You bounce around, pinball around.” “The hardest thing for in the show is, everything’s funny and I am trying not to laugh up there,” Sindelar said The orchestra pit actually plays way up high in the back loft at the theater, and they are amplified through on-stage speakers. “Everything’s possible with technology,” Robnett said. "The Producers" will be performed Sept. 30, Oct. 1, 7, 8 at 7 p.m., and Sundays, Oct. 2 and 9 at 2 p.m. For tickets and more information, click HERE.

WQAD.com New defense team requests to push back trial of man accused of murdering Breasia Terrell WQAD.com

New defense team requests to push back trial of man accused of murdering Breasia Terrell

The trial has already been pushed back once, but Henry Dinkins received a new defense five months ago.

Quad-City Times Two-ways to do it: Davenport approves conversion of 3rd and 4th Streets Quad-City Times

Two-ways to do it: Davenport approves conversion of 3rd and 4th Streets

After a lengthy discussion Wednesday night, Mayor Mike Matson cast the final vote in favor of the conversion to break the 5-5 tie.

QCOnline.com Two-ways to do it: Davenport approves conversion of 3rd and 4th Streets QCOnline.com

Two-ways to do it: Davenport approves conversion of 3rd and 4th Streets

After a lengthy discussion Wednesday night, Mayor Mike Matson cast the final vote in favor of the conversion to break the 5-5 tie.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

In Washington, former QC mayor testifies against rail merger

Canadian Pacific and Kansas City Southern railroads haven't made many public statements to people in the Quad Cities who oppose their proposed merger. One Quad-Citian on Wednesday made a statement against the merger, and traveled clear to Washington to do it. The railroads want to combine their operations in a merger that would triple the amount of traffic on the Canadian Pacific tracks that run through Muscatine, the Quad Cities and Clinton. Canadian Pacific offered financial incentives to local governments to go along with the merger. Executives from both railroads maintain the merger would be good for everyone, saying the like-minded railroads have a commitment to safety and customer service. The Surface Transportation Board is holding the hearings where, on Wednesday, former Davenport Mayor Bill Gluba spoke out against the merger. Gluba spoke as a private citizen, and not on behalf of any governmental agency, and paid his own way. Gluba focused on the nine miles of public parkland along the Mississippi River adjacent to the rail line that would go from about eight trains per day to more than 20. He pointed out thousands of people attend events in this area several times per year. "This is the railroad stretch that poses the most severe threat to the lives of people should a derailment take place, and derailments do happen all the time. Davenport has accommodated the handful of freight trains. But to jump to 22 or more trains per day - many carrying flammable shale oil from Canada - will present a clear and present danger to thousands of people," Gluba told Local 4 News. He called the merger a disaster waiting to happen. Gluba suggests a subway-style tunnel as a possibility to protect Davenport. He says the $10 million Canadian Pacific is giving Davenport for rail improvements isn't nearly enough, and asks for a $3 billion mitigation fund for affected cities.

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QC National Weather Service launching more weather balloons to help track Hurricane Ian

Since Saturday Sep. 24, the NWS station in Davenport and many across the U.S. have launched balloons every hour to support hurricane tracking efforts.

WQAD.com Quad Cities weather station  launching weather balloons to help meteorologist track Hurricane Ian WQAD.com

Quad Cities weather station launching weather balloons to help meteorologist track Hurricane Ian

The weather balloons will fly around the Midwest and help track wind direction, speed, temperature, and other useful data points.

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Council Votes To Make Davenport's 3rd & 4th Streets Two-Way Roads

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WQAD.com ImpactLife urging for blood donors to help with potential shortage in Florida due to hurricane Ian WQAD.com

ImpactLife urging for blood donors to help with potential shortage in Florida due to hurricane Ian

ImpactLife in Davenport is prepared to send blood to medical centers in Florida.

WQAD.com QC native riding out hurricane Ian WQAD.com

QC native riding out hurricane Ian

Lili Sheedy, a former Davenport resident, plans to stay at her home in St. Petersburg with her fiance as Hurricane Ian touches down in Florida.

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New defense team requests to push back trial of man accused of murdering Breasia Terrell

The trial has already been pushed back once, but Henry Dinkins received a new defense five months ago.

WQAD.com Wildcat Den State Park: Explore towering sandstone cliffs, historic mill alongside a scenic creek WQAD.com

Wildcat Den State Park: Explore towering sandstone cliffs, historic mill alongside a scenic creek

The park was founded in 1928 after 2 sisters donated the land to the state of Iowa, in an effort to preserve the unique geological features.

WQAD.com US senators from Iowa & Illinois meet with Quad Cities leaders WQAD.com

US senators from Iowa & Illinois meet with Quad Cities leaders

All four US senators from the neighboring states met with Quad Cities leaders this week to discuss public safety measures, including crime and gun violence.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Partnership aims to rescue food for best use

An estimated 40% of all the food produced in this country goes to waste, and 8.7% of Scott County and 11.6% of Rock Island County residents are considered food-insecure. Christina McDonough with the Scott County Health Department visited Local 4 to talk about the Food Rescue Partnership and efforts for rescuing food for the best possible use. For more information about the Food Rescue Partnership, click here.

OurQuadCities.com Woman sentenced for tax evasion OurQuadCities.com

Woman sentenced for tax evasion

An Oxford Junction woman was sentenced on September 27 to 18 months in federal prison for tax evasion. Penny Lane Witt, age 48, was also ordered to serve three years of supervised release and pay $75,849 in restitution to the Internal Revenue Service. According to court documents, in 2015, Witt operated businesses under the names of Ultimate Tree Service and Spruces Tree Service. An employee approached an individual in Iowa City about trimming some trees. After the initial project in 2016 and 2017, Witt and other employees returned to this residence and the same individual paid by check for multiple remodeling and landscaping projects. Witt did not keep business records, did not have business or individual bank accounts and conducted all business and payroll expenses in cash. Witt admitted that by receiving checks and cash payments from the individual, her affirmative acts of personally and willfully cashing these checks at the customer’s bank and not depositing any of these checks or cash in a bank account, she concealed any usual record of the gross income she received and attempted to evade the assessment of federal income tax. These payments included work not fully completed. In 2016 and 2017, she received approximately $469,000 in payments. Witt admitted that she knew she had a legal duty to file tax returns for those years and willfully chose not to file. “Ms. Witt took advantage of a vulnerable person and cheated them out of hundreds of thousands of dollars,” said Acting Special Agent in Charge Charles Miller, “IRS Criminal Investigation recognizes the presence of fraud targeting elder Americans and we will continue to combat these crimes and hold the responsible parties accountable for their actions.” U.S. Attorney Richard D. Westphal of the Southern District of Iowa made the announcement. The Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigations Division and the Iowa City Police Department investigated this case.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Another Davenport West threat found to be not carried out

Five days after a threat at Davenport West High School was found to be not real, a similar threat of violence Wednesday morning was found to be unsubstantiated. At 10:51 a.m., families of West students were notified that a similar air drop threat was made Wednesday morning, similar to that from Friday, Sept. 23, at the school, 3505 W. Locust St., Davenport. One parent e-mailed Wednesday afternoon that a bomb threat was made today around 10:50 a.m., and "my son texted me they went to lockdown, FBI, Police and dogs searching school all day," the parent said. "Half the school left or was allowed to leave if they didn't feel safe. My son included." Davenport Community School District spokesman Mike Vondran said later Wednesday he was not quite sure what the exact threat was from this morning. "This morning, the school was notified again of a possible threat," he said. "Authorities were notified immediately, and it was once again found to be unsubstantiated." "The school was never placed on lockdown. The investigation is still very active," Vondran said, noting Davenport police officers responded and did a search of the school. They decided that the threat was not substantiated prior to noon. "The all-clear came pretty fast," he said. "The investigation is very active, we’re confident we’re going to be able to find the source, and they will be prosecute," Vondran said. On Friday, Sept. 23, Davenport Police said an incident involving a threat that day at West High School, Davenport, remained under investigation. Shortly before 1 p.m. Friday, according to a statement from Davenport Police, Davenport Police School Resource Officers received information about a possible threat to students and staff at West High School. The district “was informed of a possible threat via airdrop message a little before 1 p.m.” Friday, spokesperson Mike Vondran told Local 4 News. “As per district protocol, Davenport Police were notified. They arrived on scene and did a thorough investigation. During the investigation, it was determined the threat was unsubstantiated.”

WQAD.com MidAmerican Energy sends emergency response team to support Hurricane Ian rescue efforts WQAD.com

MidAmerican Energy sends emergency response team to support Hurricane Ian rescue efforts

MidAmerican is sending a team of 80 volunteers, including many Quad City residents, to support rescue and recovery efforts over the next two weeks.

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Alpacas aplenty at Little Creek Alpacas in Plymouth

In 2011, a Rock Island woman moved to Plymouth, Illinois to raise alpacas and uses their fiber to make all sorts of accessories.

OurQuadCities.com Gallery opening for Basia Krol at Monmouth College OurQuadCities.com

Gallery opening for Basia Krol at Monmouth College

Monmouth College’s already busy Homecoming weekend will include an opening reception for an exhibit by Galesburg painter and ceramic artist Basia Krol. Krol's "Walk with Me" exhibit opens on Friday, September 30 and the artist will be on campus that day at 3 p.m. for a reception and gallery talk. Her exhibit will be on display in the College's Len G. Everett Gallery on the upper level of Hewes Library and the reception, talk and exhibit are free and open to the public.Barbara "Basia" Krol was born and raised in Warsaw, Poland. She studied painting and printmaking at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts and traveled extensively throughout Europe to study the old masters in all major collections. She earned her master's degree in studio art in 2000 from Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts and had her first solo show in her hometown. In 2002, she was awarded three artist-in-residency programs across the United States, in Washington, Georgia and at Studios Midwest, which brought her to Galesburg. She returned to Warsaw to teach art in international schools. Krol returned to the U.S. in 2004 and became involved in the Chicago art scene by running painting workshops, teaching classes at the Hyde Park Art Center and working on portrait and mural commissions. She had a solo show at the Vanderpoel Museum in Chicago and was also part of a three-person show in the city.In 2011, Krol returned to Galesburg to raise a family. She has since been involved with the local art community as well as Studios Midwest. She had solo shows at Carl Sandburg College and the Galesburg Civic Arts Center and taught art history at Sandburg for two years. Her artwork is in private collections in Poland, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States. She continues to paint and sculpt, as well as teach painting and drawing through workshops and private lessons and judges juried art shows. Recently, Krol has developed a passion for ceramics and says she dreams of buying a kiln and sharing the joy of clay with the local community in her garden studio, "while cats wander about and kids play in the treehouse."

OurQuadCities.com School district faces possible bus driver strike OurQuadCities.com

School district faces possible bus driver strike

The Davenport Community School District announced bus services may be affected by a potential drivers' strike. At issue is the possibility that some bus drivers represented by the Teamsters 371 Union may decide to strike on Monday, October 3. The school district has the following statement on its website: Davenport Community School District is committed to our student's safety, quality of education, and accessibility to schools.As such, we are closely monitoring the negotiations between the district’s school bus provider and the drivers’ union.This is a situation over which DCSD has no direct control. In our sincere concern for the best interests of our students, we are hoping for a quick and amicable resolution to the negotiations.However, we are exploring possible contingency plans if a resolution is not reached. We also encourage you to have a plan in place to provide your own transportation to schools starting Monday, Oct. 3, until a resolution is reached.We will remain in communication with our district about the situation as it develops. Please continue to monitor our website and social media for timely updates.Thank you for your patience and understanding. Davenport Community School District Busing throughout the Davenport Community School District is managed by Durham School Services. The following message was sent to district families on behalf of Durham School Services: Good morning Parents and Guardians,Today we are reaching out to inform you that some bus drivers represented by the Teamsters 371 Union may decide to strike on Monday, October 3, 2022.We are working to see how we can potentially avoid a labor strike, but if one does occur, this will significantly impact transportation services. Make sure you have a contingency plan in place to provide your own transportation until a resolution is reached. We will keep you posted when we receive updates concerning any potential lapse in service.Jen AndresRegional Manager, IowaDurham School Services For updates, visit the Davenport Community School District website or Facebook page.

WQAD.com Here's how you can help those impacted by Hurricane Ian WQAD.com

Here's how you can help those impacted by Hurricane Ian

Hurricane Ian is now a Category 4 hurricane, and local organizations are headed south to support affected regions in recovery efforts.

OurQuadCities.com Mobile Museum of Tolerance is at Moline library OurQuadCities.com

Mobile Museum of Tolerance is at Moline library

As part of Moline Public Library's contribution to the community-wide Out of Darkness project, the Simon Wiesenthal Mobile Museum of Tolerance is now in the north parking lot at 3210 41st St. The bus will be here and open to the public until 6 p.m. today, 1 to 6 p.m. Thursday, and 2:30 to 4 p.m. Friday. The bus videos will alternate between The Power of Ordinary People and Anne Frank. The videos are about 10 minutes in length. The Mobile Museum of Tolerance visits 150 schools and communities each year. The Mobile Museum of Tolerance (MMOT) is the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s newest educational initiative, bringing world-class learning experiences to communities across the state of Illinois, according to the library. The purpose of the MMOT is to inspire people of all ages and backgrounds, empowering them to raise their voices and combat anti-Semitism, bullying, racism, hate, and intolerance and to promote human dignity. Modeled after the Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center’s successful “Tour for Humanity” bus, which has visited hundreds of schools across Canada since launching in 2013, the MMOT is the first of its kind in the United States. MMOT uses innovative technology and interactive lessons to bring its message of tolerance directly to Illinois communities. In addition to serving middle and high school students, the MMOT is an educational resource for teachers, faith groups, law enforcement agencies, and businesses, as well as community and government leaders. With a plan to visit around 150 schools and communities each year, the MMOT hopes to inspire thousands of Illinoisans to stand up to hate and strive toward positive social change. The permanent Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles is the educational arm of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, an internationally renowned Jewish human rights organization, according to its website. The only museum of its kind in the world, the MOT is dedicated to challenging visitors to understand the Holocaust in both historic and contemporary contexts and confront all forms of prejudice and discrimination in our world today.

OurQuadCities.com GOP candidates to speak at Ronald Reagan Dinner OurQuadCities.com

GOP candidates to speak at Ronald Reagan Dinner

Wyoming Congressional Candidate Harriet Hageman will deliver the keynote address at the Scott County Republican Party’s 14th Annual Ronald Reagan Dinner on Tuesday, October 11 at the Quad Cities Waterfront Center, 2021 State Street in Bettendorf. Tickets are $70 per person, plus a convenience fee, if purchased by October 3. After October 3, the ticket price will be $75 per person, plus a convenience fee. Doors open at 5 p.m. for a silent auction and social time. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. This year’s dinner will feature Congresswoman Mariannette Miller-Meeks and other elected officials and candidates as honored guests. (submitted photo) “Eastern Iowa is ready to hear from Harriet Hageman during her first visit to Iowa. She is an inspiration as a fighter for the American people who does not give up,” said Scott County GOP Chairwoman Jeanita McNulty. “Iowans are eager to give an audience to Harriet’s message of pushing back against the Washington machine.” The Ronald Reagan Dinner, first held in 2008, is the largest and most prestigious Republican gathering in eastern Iowa. Previous speakers have included Vice President Mike Pence, presidential candidates and other notable state and national elected leaders. Tickets can be purchased here or by calling (563) 823-5854.

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Illinois Red Cross Volunteer Going To Florida To Help With Hurricane Relief Efforts

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Quad-City Times Sen. Chuck Grassley: No sunsetting Social Security Quad-City Times

Sen. Chuck Grassley: No sunsetting Social Security

Grassley says any change to Social Security will not cut benefits for seniors.

QCOnline.com Sen. Chuck Grassley: No sunsetting Social Security QCOnline.com

Sen. Chuck Grassley: No sunsetting Social Security

Grassley says any change to Social Security will not cut benefits for seniors.

OurQuadCities.com ImpactLife helps in blood drive for region affected by Hurricane Ian OurQuadCities.com

ImpactLife helps in blood drive for region affected by Hurricane Ian

ImpactLife is participating in a national response to supply blood for the region affected by Hurricane Ian, according to a news release. The blood center has been asked to send a shipment of Type O red blood cells to Florida as Hurricane Ian approaches the coast of Florida, the release says. Additional donations of red blood cells and platelets are needed to maintain the blood supply for local hospitals and for ongoing support of the hurricane region. For information on local donation centers and mobile blood drives, call 800-747-5401, visit here or schedule via the ImpactLife mobile app. ImpactLife is part of a resource-sharing network of not-for-profit community blood centers that supports needs throughout the country when called upon. As residents of the affected region prepare for Hurricane Ian, hospitals and blood providers are requesting support from other parts of the country. “We expect donors in the affected region will be unable to give blood when the hurricane hits, either due topower outages, evacuations, or sheltering in place,” said Mike Parejko, chief executive officer of ImpactLife. “We know blood components will be needed for ongoing patient care in the region, and we are glad to join other blood providers around the U.S. in responding to this need.” ImpactLife will prioritize local needs before shipping blood components outside of the blood center’s directservice region. “We are asking all potential blood donors and our blood drive coordinators to help us answer the call,” said Amanda Hess, vice president, donor relations and marketing. “We will need to increase our donations this week and next to continue meeting local needs while also supporting the region affected by Hurricane Ian.” ImpactLife Donor PromotionThrough Nov. 13, all donors will receive a voucher to redeem for an electronic gift card or ImpactLife Blood Type Mug by coming to give blood at any ImpactLife donor center or mobile blood drive. For more information, visit here. About ImpactLifeImpactLife is a not-for-profit community organization providing blood services to 124 hospitals in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin, as well as resource sharing partners across the country. Services extend fromsouthcentral Wisconsin to St. Louis, Missouri and from Danville, Illinois to Chariton, Iowa. ImpactLife operates 22 Donor Centers and holds approximately 5000 mobile blood drives annually to provide blood components needed for patient transfusions at hospitals throughout our region. For more information, visit here.

OurQuadCities.com Have you seen these suspects? Crime Stoppers wants to know! OurQuadCities.com

Have you seen these suspects? Crime Stoppers wants to know!

Crime Stoppers of the Quad Cities wants your help catching two fugitives.  It’s a Local 4 News exclusive. You can get an elevated reward for information on this week’s cases: ERIC BREWER, 31, 6’1”, 160 pounds, brown hair, hazel eyes. Wanted by Moline Police for aggravated fleeing/attempting to elude police (2 counts) CURTIS HUDSON, 32, 6’1”, 300 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. Wanted in Scott County for possession/delivery crack cocaine and possession controlled substance. Eric Brewer (L) and Curtis Hudson (Crime Stoppers) You have a week to contact police for an elevated reward. Call the tip line at (309) 762-9500. All tips are anonymous.

OurQuadCities.com Have you seen this suspect? OurQuadCities.com

Have you seen this suspect?

Have you seen this person? A man is accused of taking cash out of a register at Leisure Lanes in Davenport on Tuesday, September 27. According to a post on their Facebook page, someone took an unknown amount of cash from a register in the office while the staff was working. The video is being reviewed by staff and they are offering a $500 reward for information. (photos: Leisure Lanes)(photos: Leisure Lanes)(photos: Leisure Lanes) If you have any information on this case, call the Davenport Police Department at (563) 326-7979.

OurQuadCities.com Parents voice concerns with Walcott Elementary proposal OurQuadCities.com

Parents voice concerns with Walcott Elementary proposal

More reaction from parents Wednesday night about possible changes in the Davenport Community School District. A long-term facilities plan submitted to the school board Tuesday night included a couple of options for Walcott Elementary School. Those proposals would change it from kindergarten through eighth grade to a middle school. We spoke with a local parent, Jessica Aubry -- a wife and mother of two who lives in the Walcott community. "No one's answering questions like, 'Where are these kids gonna go to school?'" Aubry said. "There's not a lot of questions and a lot of misinformation, but that's because no one's answering questions like, 'Where are these kids gonna go to school?'" The family of four moved to Walcott five years ago for the convenience and smaller classroom sizes of Walcott Elementary, as well as the preschool nearby. "Our house is only blocks away from the school, so it is literally one turn," Aubry said. "They turn down our road and then go straight down James Street to go to school. They could potentially walk to school -- hopefully be walked to and from school. And the same with the preschool we live within walking distance of it -- like I can see it from my house." Walcott Elementary parents seem to be the most vocal right now as the school district's long range facilities committee looks at possibly redrawing school district lines-- potentially affecting several school buildings. Declining enrollment is one reason why. "I feel like a broken record stating this all the time," Davenport School Board President Dan Gosa said. "I feel like there's a lot of misconception out there I've heard from city council members. This board has not had any discussions on pathways. It has been through the Long Range Planning and Facilities Committee, which included a staff member and parent from every school." The Aubrys had no idea Walcott's K-8 makeup could be changed until a petition was created just a few weeks ago. "A lot of the people in the community didn't know until they were going around to get signatures for a petition," Aubry said. This week, a survey will begin to go out households. The family and its community is hoping to do what they can to help stop changes from happening to Walcott Elementary School. "There's a couple Facebook groups that are together to work together on the surveys that are gonna come out about district re-drawing ... emailing the board ... showing up to the school board meetings … doing open forms to speak… to get the voice heard," Aubry said. "The more the community comes out to show their support for this school, the better the chances are to save that school." The school board's Long Range Facilities Committee says the responses to the surveys will be considered in the planning process.

OurQuadCities.com QCSO and singers thrilled to be back together for immortal Beethoven 9 OurQuadCities.com

QCSO and singers thrilled to be back together for immortal Beethoven 9

This week is very special for Patrick Downing of Davenport, an avid pianist and singer who works as director of development for the Figge Art Museum. Thursday, Sept. 29 is his 10th wedding anniversary (with wife Kristena), and he once again is singing bass in a big choir with the Quad City Symphony Orchestra this weekend, in one of the most famous pieces in classical music history -- Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 ("Choral"). The Quad City Symphony and Chorus performed the Verdi Requiem in the first weekend of March 2020, just before COVID shutdowns. It's the first time a massive choir has joined the QCSO in over two and a half years, since the Verdi Requiem in early March 2020, right before COVID shut down the world. Downing sang in that, as well as other choral masterworks since 2010 -- Orff's "Carmina Burana," the Mozart Requiem, Britten's War Requiem, Mahler's "Resurrection" Symphony, Bach's St. Matthew Passion, and the Beethoven Ninth in 2015, in the QCSO's 100th season. "I think the Beethoven 9th just might be the greatest finale in the history of music," Downing said this week of the last 19 minutes of the towering masterwork, featuring four vocal soloists and 130-strong QC choir, prepared by Jon Hurty, Augustana's director of choral activities. "Beethoven was completely deaf when he wrote this and he knew in his mind how this would sound," Downing marveled of setting the immortal, idealistic Friedrich Schiller text, "Ode to Joy," sung in German. "It's so well-known by so many cultures, countries around the world," the singer said. The Ninth's call for brotherhood and unity is needed today more than ever, Downing said. "With the conflict between Russia and Ukraine, so much divisiveness in our own country, 2022 seems like a coincidental year for us to do this," he said. "No matter what people's background, people's beliefs, music is the universal language. If you can't agree on anything else, you can agree on how beautiful this music is." Patrick Downing of Davenport and his wife Kristena celebrate their 10th anniversary on Thursday, Sept. 29. The Beethoven Ninth has a special place in Downing's heart since he first heard it while in high school in southeast Iowa. At his wedding in 2012 at Davenport's First Presbyterian, the music director chose the hymn with the familiar "Ode to Joy" melody ("Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee") to be part of the service. Then in the April 2015 QCSO performance of the symphony, Downing said his wife Kristena in the audience first felt their first child kick (she was then three and a half months pregnant) during the final movement. That son, Isaac, is almost 7 now. Originally planned to kick off 2020-21 In pre-COVID times, the QCSO originally scheduled the Beethoven 9 to start its 2021-21 Masterworks season, coinciding with the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven's 1770 birth. That October 2020 concert instead featured a much smaller ensemble playing Beethoven's Symphony No. 1. That November it rescheduled the previously planned Violin Concerto (from December), showcasing the concertmaster Naha Greenholtz, and newly substituted Beethoven’s groundbreaking Symphony No. 3 (“Eroica”) in December 2020. Each featured ensembles of fewer than 45 players. Downing was in the massive choir that sang the Verdi Requiem in 2020 with the QCSO. Downing said the 130 singers (including the Augustana College Choir, Augustana Oratorio Society and Choral Artists) have a newfound appreciation of performing en masse with the QCSO. "There aren't many orchestral pieces that are more uplifting and inspirational than Beethoven's 9th," he said. "Everyone is just overjoyed to finally sing together again. We trust each other, so if anyone feels sick, we take care of ourselves." They began rehearsing in early August, many singers still wearing masks, said QCSO conductor and music director Mark Russell Smith. "Having so much humanity on stage and having singing is obviously a whole different component," he said Tuesday. "For a conductor, it's great to have connection with singers and to have the stage full." The choir sits on stage the first three movements, and with the soloists only sing the last 19 minutes of the hour-plus masterwork. "They have the best seats in the house, you know," Smith said. "Participating in the 4th movement, it really does make for a unique energy. And I think a unique connection. Watching the amazing players of the Quad City Symphony and just seeing the symphony unfold and then adding their culminating voices to that in the 4th movement. That's the reason why I think the psychology of the piece works so well. And why it's always why every performance is a very special thing." 'The perfect musical expression' Beethoven was completely deaf at the time he wrote the groundbreaking Ninth, which premiered in 1824 (he died in 1827). "It's attempting the perfect musical expression," Smith said, noting the composer's titanic struggle in the symphony, reflecting his personal life. An overhead shot of the QCSO and choir performing the Verdi Requiem in March 2020. "It was certainly groundbreaking, the idea of a symphony having singers," he said. "What was groundbreaking is the thought of taking instrumental music to the very highest level. The instrumental music is on the highest level, but then you add the have the human voice to that. And then the inspirational words and it just takes on a higher level of meaning." Beethoven was in his own world, and that allowed him to come up with this revolutionary piece, stretching the boundaries of classical music and the symphonic form, Smith said. "The things he dreamed up, the things that he heard in his mind didn't have to be related to the world and it freed him up to try things to be experimental, to push the envelope," he said. "Beethoven 9 is hard to sing. It's hard to do the things that he is expecting instrumentalists to do and vocalists to do," Smith said. "And no one has written music like that for voices. That is one of the manifestations of him living in his own world, in his mind, because he was shut off from the world." The composer was "less concerned about making it comfortable for the violinist or comfortable for the singers," the QC conductor said. "So it's on us to come up with ways to make his dreams a reality and that's the philosophy that the composer's adopted." The Quad City Symphony Orchestra is led by music director and conductor Mark Russell Smith. The timing today for the ideals of uniting humanity in an "Ode to Joy" also couldn't be more perfect. "All mankind become brothers and sisters, you know, everybody becomes one...Absolutely, it continues to be an aspiration," Smith said, citing today's bitter political polarization across the country. "We humans are not perfect and so I don't know when there is a performance of the 9th Symphony where we have a perfect time," he said. "We're always aspirational and kind of for different reasons and boy, if there's ever a time where men and women should become brothers and sisters, this is the time." A new introductory "Ode" The Saturday and Sunday concerts will start with the QCSO and singers in Jonathan Bailey Holland’s choral-orchestral “Ode” (2018), an 18-minute work commenting on the 70-minute Beethoven 9 with influences of rap, hip-hop and minimalism. Composer Jonathan Bailey Holland The synthesis of disparate influences is an animating process behind “Ode,” which was commissioned by the Cincinnati Symphony to be featured alongside that warhorse of warhorses, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, according to QCSO program notes. Though the “Ode to Joy” melody is the most obvious path into the Ninth, Holland sought more subtle ways to engage Beethoven’s work, focusing “on certain moments of the Ninth Symphony that resonate with me personally, while also dialoguing with various moments within Beethoven’s work, some of which are fleeting or surprising, and yet hold deeper meaning than might appear on the surface," QC composer Jacob Bancks wrote. Of course, two centuries and vastly different cultural experiences separate Beethoven and Holland, and one stark difference between their approaches is use of the chorus. Ever a devoted disciple of the German Enlightenment, “Beethoven set Schiller’s utopian text with clarity, bold intensity, and optimism,” the program says. Holland, a composer operating in a more pluralistic and less idealistic cultural environment, instead employs text in a more abstracted manner, eschewing words for colorful yet unintelligible syllables. This technique, pioneered by Ravel early in the 20th century and later taken to extremes by modernists like Luciano Berio and György Ligeti, “has an eerie, uncanny effect, blurring the distinction between voices and instruments,” Bancks said. Mark Russell Smith began his QCSO leadership in October 2008, when that season also began with Beethoven's 9th Symphony. This is similar to the synthesis which Holland uses when blending disparate musical styles. “The end result of all this blurring is a surprisingly clear, highly individual style of music, both familiar and surprisingly new,” he said. The program notes for the Ninth say that with this symphony, Beethoven “left a treasury of inspiration for innumerable composers after him.” It “became the mystical goal of all my strange thoughts and desires about music,” wrote composer Richard Wagner. “This, I thought, must surely contain the secret of all secrets.” Mr. Holland's opus Composer Jonathan Bailey Holland (b. 1974) began studying composition while a student at the Interlochen Arts Academy, where he earned a school-wide award for his first composition. Upon graduation from Interlochen, he continued composition studies with Ned Rorem at the Curtis Institute of Music, where he earned his bachelor's degree. Holland received a Ph.D. in music from Harvard University in 2000. He is now the Jack G. Buncher Head of the School of Music at Carnegie Mellon University, after serving as Chair of Composition, Contemporary Music, and Core Studies at Boston Conservatory at Berklee. .Holland’s works have been performed and commissioned by many organizations, both nationally and internationally. Highlights include five works commissioned by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, including "Ode,"  which premiered during the 2018-19 season when Holland served as composer-in-residence. He was asked to base the piece off the Ninth, Smith said, noting snippets of Beethoven appear in "Ode," which includes a wordless chorus. "Through it all is the real mood and gestures of Beethoven 9, but through a 21st-century lens," Smith said. "So it's cool." The QCSO (seen here in late 2020) will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 at the Adler Theatre and Sunday, Oct. 2 at Centennial Hall. "At the Quad City Symphony, we perform all sorts of music from, all over. But when we do a masterwork, I mean, it's great," he said of the Ninth. "Of course, it speaks to the soul and all those things. But for some people, it may be the very first time you hear it and what's the context of this in 2022?" The new Holland piece provides that context, Smith said. "It's one artist's kind of reaction to this incredible work of art. So yeah, it's very interesting and very cool." Downing said the voices do humming and "oohs and aahs" and it's an homage to the Ninth. "The audience will be able to tell where Holland got inspiration from Beethoven. We're excited to do it." The concerts -- Saturday at 7:30 p.m. p.m. at Davenport's Adler Theatre and Sunday at 2 p.m. at Rock Island's Centennial Hall -- will be performed without intermission, and no break between the two works. Concertgoers have the option of seeing the QCSO program online. The link to the Live Stream and your personal access code will be included in your ticket purchase confirmation email. The digital concert will be a livestream on Oct. 1, 2022, at 7:30, and will be available for viewing through Jan. 7, 2023. Please allow 12 hours for video processing after the conclusion of the live-streamed event before attempting to access the recording. If you have questions, contact Caitlin Bishop at cbishop@qcso.org or 563-424-7734 For tickets and more information, click HERE.

OurQuadCities.com Have you seen this shoplifter? OurQuadCities.com

Have you seen this shoplifter?

Have you seen this person? Pawn Central in Rock Island is looking for a man suspected of shoplifting a guitar from the store. According to a post on their Facebook page, on September 22 someone took a Framus Phil X Vintage Sunburst guitar in like new condition with an MSRP of $999 from the store. They are offering a $100 reward for the return of the guitar or the name of the individual. (photo: Pawn Central Rock Island)(photo: Pawn Central Rock Island)(photo: Pawn Central Rock Island) More information can be found on the store’s Facebook page. If you have any information on this case, please call the Rock Island Police Department at (309) 732-2677.

OurQuadCities.com A chilly Wednesday and a look at Ian. OurQuadCities.com

A chilly Wednesday and a look at Ian.

Brrr.  It's a cold morning so make sure you grab that coat as you head out.  As we get going into the afternoon, highs will climb into the lower 60's with sunny skies. We will have another cold night today with lows falling down into the 30's once again. We start to hit a warm-up pattern heading into the end of the week and this weekend. Look for temps to climb back into the lower 70's. Now a look at Hurricane Ian. This morning Ian rapidly intensified into a very strong Category 4 hurricane. Expected to make landfall this afternoon around the Fort Myers region. Storm surges are expected to reach 12-15 feet in this area. Then it will track to central parts of Flordia and dump nearly 2 feet of rain.

OurQuadCities.com WATCH: Railroad merger hearings OurQuadCities.com

WATCH: Railroad merger hearings

Three days of hearings began Wednesday focused on the proposed merger between Canadian Pacific and Kansas City Southern railroads. The Surface Transportation Board is holding the hearings in Washington D.C. More coverage Railroad merger hearings to begin Matson: Canadian Pacific merger deal an ‘insurance policy’ River town or railroad town? Merger might tip scales Petition launched to derail the train merger Railroad merger could impede riverfront plans ‘A disaster waiting to happen’: Hundreds oppose Canadian Pacific and Kansas City Southern railway merger at public input meeting

OurQuadCities.com Deadline approaching for applications for U.S. military service academies OurQuadCities.com

Deadline approaching for applications for U.S. military service academies

The deadline is quickly approaching for high school students who want to request a nomination to a U.S. military service academy for the Class of 2027 from U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL). Nominations will close on Tuesday, November 1 and her office has been accepting applications through her website from students since March. Every year, with the help of a nominating committee, she selects nominees from a group of outstanding Illinois students to receive Congressional nominations to attend West Point, the Air Force Academy, the Naval Academy or the Merchant Marine Academy.  “It takes a special kind of young person to succeed at a U.S. military service academy,” says Duckworth. “The rigorous nomination process demands outstanding test scores, a high GPA and a commitment to community service. I encourage all interested Illinois students to apply for a nomination and I applaud their desire to serve our country.” These academies allow students to serve their country while receiving a full four-year scholarship. Upon acceptance of an appointment into an Academy, a student commits to five years of active-duty service after graduation. U.S. citizens between the ages of 17 and 23 may receive appointment to one of the four service academies. To be considered, a student must receive a formal nomination from their member of Congress, Senator or the Vice President. Students must apply directly to the Military Service Academy and elected official of their choice to be considered. A nomination does not guarantee an offer of appointment. For more information, students can visit Senator Duckworth’s website.

OurQuadCities.com Fundraiser aims to help loved ones of 24-year-old QC crash victim OurQuadCities.com

Fundraiser aims to help loved ones of 24-year-old QC crash victim

A GoFundMe page has been launched to help pay funeral expenses for a 24-year-old Davenport woman killed in a single-vehicle crash. Alecia M. Garcia, 24, of Davenport, was ejected from a truck Sept. 21, 2022 around 8:30 p.m. at the intersection of Eastern Avenue and High Street, Davenport. She was pronounced dead at the scene, and a passenger was found trapped in the truck and transported to a local hospital. “LeeLee will be remembered by everyone who had the pleasure of meeting her one-of-a-kind soul,” the GoFundMe page says of Garcia. “Alecia was a wild spirit full of so much life, love and laughter. Every room she walked in lit up in her presence. “She was unlike any other with her untouchable spunky personality, and bright contagious smile,” posted her friend, Haley Rehm, who organized the fundraiser that’s raised $2,674 as of Wednesday. “Alecia was tough as nails, courageous, and adventurous but had the most heart for the ones she loved. She was constantly being goofy whether she was cracking a joke, or dancing around. Her laugh could make any of the worst days better. “LeeLee was the life of the party; she believed in working hard but playing hard too. But most of all, her love for her family was unmatched,” Rehm wrote. “The family is left heartbroken and lost after the suddenness of this loss. Any donations would be greatly appreciated to help send our girl home in the way she deserves to honor all the life and love she shared with so many.” To contribute, click HERE.

OurQuadCities.com ImpactLife in QC sending Type O blood to Florida as hurricane approaches OurQuadCities.com

ImpactLife in QC sending Type O blood to Florida as hurricane approaches

ImpactLife is participating in a national response to supply blood for the region affected by Hurricane Ian. The blood center has been asked to send a shipment of Type O red blood cells to Florida as Hurricane Ian approaches the Gulf Coast. ImpactLife shipped 20 units Tuesday afternoon by air. "We are among many blood centers around the country contributing to the effort and expect to receive additional requests as the storm’s impact is understood," spokesman Kirby Winn said Wednesday morning. (bloodcenter.org) Additional donations of red blood cells and platelets are needed to maintain the blood supply for local hospitals and for ongoing support of the hurricane region. For information on local donation centers and mobile blood drives, call (800) 747-5401, visit www.bloodcenterimpact.org, or schedule via the ImpactLife mobile app, available at www.bloodcenter.org/app. ImpactLife is part of a resource sharing network of nonprofit community blood centers that supports needs throughout the country when called upon. As residents of the affected region prepare for Hurricane Ian, hospitals and blood providers are requesting support from other parts of the country. “We expect donors in the affected region will be unable to give blood when the hurricane hits, either due to power outages, evacuations, or sheltering in place,” Mike Parejko, CEO of ImpactLife, said in a Wednesday release. “We know blood components will be needed for ongoing patient care in the region, and we are glad to join other blood providers around the U.S. in responding to this need.” ImpactLife will prioritize local needs before shipping blood components outside of the blood center’s direct service region. “We are asking all potential blood donors and our blood drive coordinators to help us answer the call,” said Amanda Hess, Vice President, Donor Relations and Marketing. “We will need to increase our donations this week and next to continue meeting local needs while also supporting the region affected by Hurricane Ian.” ImpactLife Donor Promotion Through Nov. 13, all donors will receive a voucher to redeem for an electronic gift card or ImpactLife Blood Type Mug by coming to give blood at any ImpactLife donor center or mobile blood drive. For more information, click HERE.

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UFO?! Watch This Bright String of Lights Fly Across Iowa

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WQAD.com Meet the alpaca babies just born on this Illinois farm WQAD.com

Meet the alpaca babies just born on this Illinois farm

In 2011 a Rock Island woman moved to Plymouth, Illinois to raise alpacas.

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Jon Pardi to Perform at 2023 Great Jones County Fair

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OurQuadCities.com K9 will receive bullet-proof vest OurQuadCities.com

K9 will receive bullet-proof vest

Muscatine Police Department’s K9 Dexter will receive a bullet- and stab-protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. K9 Dexter’s vest is sponsored by Don and Misty Fike of Galesburg, Ill., and will be embroidered with the sentiment “Born to Love-Trained to Serve-Loyal Always.” Delivery is expected within eight to 10-weeks, according to a news release. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc.,, established in 2009, is a charity with a mission is to provide bullet- and stab-protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. This potentially lifesaving body armor for four-legged K9 officers is U.S. made, custom fitted, and NIJ certified, Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. has provided more than 4,740 vests to K9s in all 50 states at a value of $6.9 million, made possible by both private and corporate donations. The program is open to U.S. dogs that are at least 20-months-old and actively employed and certified with law enforcement or related agencies. K9s with expired vests are also eligible to participate. There are an estimated 30,000 law-enforcement K9s throughout the United States, the release says. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. accepts tax-deductible contributions in any amount, while a single donation of $960 will sponsor one vest. Each vest has a value of $1,744 to $2,283, weighs an average of four to five pounds and comes with a five-year warranty. For more information, or to learn about volunteer opportunities, call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts donations here.

OurQuadCities.com Suspect faces homicide-by-vehicle charge for fatal May crash OurQuadCities.com

Suspect faces homicide-by-vehicle charge for fatal May crash

A 40-year-old Davenport man faces felony charges - including homicide by vehicle - after he was arrested on a warrant. Octavius Sallis faces felony charges of homicide by vehicle - operating under the influence, and operating while under the influence - third offense; an aggravated misdemeanor charge of possession of a controlled substance - cannabidiol third/subsequent offense; and a serious misdemeanor charge of unlawful possession of a prescription drug, court records say. Shortly before 8:30 p.m. May 19, Davenport Police responded to the intersection of West Kimberly Road and Fairmount Street for a vehicle crash, arrest affidavits say. Sallis was driving a 2016 Dodge Journey when he failed to yield the right of way on a left hand turn to a motorcyclist. This was determined by defendant statements and video footage. The other motorist succumbed to injuries suffered in the crash, police say. The motorcyclist later was identified as 56-year-old Davenport resident Michael Vickers, according to a news release from Davenport Police. After the crash, Sallis was "was uneasy on his feet and had slow movement." He showed multiple signs of impairment from sobriety tests, affidavits say. Additionally affidavits say "There was the presence of amphetamines, cocaine metabolite, and marijuana metabolites in the defendant's urine," affidavits say. Sallis has two prior OWI convictions from 09/17/2019 and 03/02/2020. (Metabolites are indicators that a person used the "parent" drug of that metabolite. A drug metabolite is a byproduct of the body breaking down, or "metabolizing," a drug into a different substance.) The defendant's vehicle was searched and 5.75 grams of marijuana were located in the back seat/trunk area along with a black digital scale with marijuana residue on it in the center console. Two Tramadol pills were located in the driver's side door of the vehicle tested. (Tramadol is a synthetic opioid used to reduce pain.) Additionally, Sallis had no insurance at the time of the crash, affidavits say. Sallis is being held on $15,000 cash-only bond in Scott County Jail. He is set for a preliminary appearance Oct. 7 in Scott County Court. Homicide by vehicle is a Class B felony that carries a mandatory prison sentence of 25 years.

Quad-City Times Davenport council to decide on street conversion tonight Quad-City Times

Davenport council to decide on street conversion tonight

For months, alderman have discussed the pros and cons of converting 3rd and 4th Streets from one ways into two ways.

QCOnline.com Davenport council to decide on street conversion tonight QCOnline.com

Davenport council to decide on street conversion tonight

For months, alderman have discussed the pros and cons of converting 3rd and 4th Streets from one ways into two ways.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Eldridge man sentenced to 15 years in prison for child pornography charge

The 33-year-old man was also ordered to pay a total of $42,000 to his 14 victims.

Tuesday, September 27th, 2022

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

QCA man sentenced to 25 years for child pornography

Jacob Paul Bermel, 39, of Muscatine, was sentenced on Monday to 300 months - 25 years - in prison after his plea to charges of production and possession of child pornography. Bermel was ordered to pay $3,000 in restitution to each of his four victims, totaling $12,000, a news release says. The investigation into Bermel began when law enforcement received a report of a hidden camera in a bathroom of his house. The investigation revealed that Bermel made recordings that contained child pornography. Further, Bermel had been downloading and uploading child pornography from the internet and on social media applications for many years. Two cybertips were received by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, indicating that a social media account associated with Bermal uploaded images of teenage girls. U. S. Attorney Richard D. Westphal of the Southern District of Iowa made the announcement. The Federal Bureau of Investigation investigated the case., which was prosecuted by the U. S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Iowa as part of the Department of Justice’s “Project Safe Childhood” initiative. That was started in 2006 as a nationwide effort to combine law enforcement investigations and prosecutions, community action, and public awareness in order to reduce the incidence of sexual exploitation of children. Any persons having knowledge of a child being sexually abused are encouraged to call the Iowa Sexual Abuse Hotline at 1-800-284-7821, the release says.

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With rising energy costs affecting Quad Cities residents, what can be done to optimize energy efficiency?

As global shipping issues cause a strain on the gas supply, how can Quad Cities residents mitigate the effects of rising energy costs?

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Illinois Family’s Brilliant ‘Stranger Things’ Halloween Illusion Has the Internet Stumped

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Former Quad Citizen in Florida, waiting for Hurricane Ian's arrival

Former Davenport resident Lili Sheedy is experiencing her first hurricane as she prepares for Hurricane Ian's arrival in her St. Petersburg home.

WQAD.com Augustana students collect samples from Silver Creek for local water tests WQAD.com

Augustana students collect samples from Silver Creek for local water tests

The college partnered with the City of Davenport to give Biology and Environmental Science students a chance to collect and test local water samples.

OurQuadCities.com QC volunteers among energy crews who will help with hurricane efforts OurQuadCities.com

QC volunteers among energy crews who will help with hurricane efforts

MidAmerican Energy will send an emergency response team, including Quad City volunteers, to Georgia to assist with Hurricane Ian restoration efforts. At the request of Georgia Power, MidAmerican will send an emergency response team consisting of nearly 80 employees, including line crews, supervisory and support teams, as well as utility trucks and equipment, a news release says. Team members, who work across MidAmerican’s service area, volunteered for the assignment. “We don’t know exactly where our crews will end up, depending on the damage, but we do know that MidAmerican employees are up to the task of restoring customers whose lives are disrupted by Hurricane Ian,” said John Guy, MidAmerican vice president of electric delivery. "We know from experience how important it is for a utility to get help quickly when disaster strikes. We’re pleased that we can provide that help to another utility and its customers when they need it most," he said. Crews will depart from the Quad Cities early Wednesday and travel to a staging location in the Atlanta area Friday morning to receive restoration assignments. It’s not yet clear how long MidAmerican crews will be in hurricane-impacted areas, although crews are prepared for a two-week effort, if needed. Once MidAmerican crews complete their assignments in Georgia, they could be requested to travel elsewhere to assist or may return home, depending on conditions. About MidAmerican EnergyMidAmerican Energy, headquartered in Des Moines, serves 804,000 electric customers in Iowa, Illinois and South Dakota, and 781,000 natural gas customers in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and South Dakota. For more information, visit here.

OurQuadCities.com Frost Advisory for the Quad Cities OurQuadCities.com

Frost Advisory for the Quad Cities

Ready for some chilly weather? Well, it's coming! There's a Frost Advisory for the Quad Cities tonight. It starts at midnight and goes until 8 a.m. Lows will dip into the middle 30s by Wednesday morning. If you have any sensitive plants or flowers outside, it's a good night to bring them in or cover them up with a sheet or light towel. The record low for Sep. 28th is way down there at 24°. Wednesday night also looks chilly with lows in the middle and upper 30s. By this weekend highs climb back into the lower 70s.

OurQuadCities.com Iowa man sentenced to 25 years for distribution of child pornography OurQuadCities.com

Iowa man sentenced to 25 years for distribution of child pornography

A 40-year-old Council Bluffs man has been sentenced to 25 years for child pornography charges. Jason Lauran Kinman was sentenced Sept. 20 to 25 years in prison after his plea to charges of distribution and production of child pornography and coercion and enticement of a minor. Kinman must also serve a 10-year term of supervised release after the prison term. There is no parole in the federal system, a news release says. In July 2021, a concerned family member made a police report after finding Kinman in a car with a 13-year-old girl in the back seat with him. Officers obtained Kinman’s social media history and found that Kinman was communicating with several girls "in an inappropriate sexual manner," including requesting naked photos or videos from them, and sending sexual photos and videos of himself and other girls. Law enforcement executed a search warrant at Kinman’s residence in Council Bluffs and seized electronic evidence. A forensic examination identified numerous images of child pornography. U. S. Attorney Richard D. Westphal of the Southern District of Iowa made the announcement. The Buena Vista County Sheriff’s Office, Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation, Internet Crimes Against Children, and Council Bluffs Police Department investigated the case. This case was prosecuted as part of the Department of Justice’s “Project Safe Childhood” initiative, which was started in 2006 as a nationwide effort to combine law enforcement investigations and prosecutions, community action, and public awareness in order to reduce the incidence of sexual exploitation of children. Any persons having knowledge of a child being sexually abused are encouraged to call the Iowa Sexual Abuse Hotline at 1-800-284-7821, the news release says.

Quad-City Times Moline Public Library to host bestselling author Nickolas Butler Quad-City Times

Moline Public Library to host bestselling author Nickolas Butler

Library patrons can enjoy an evening with bestselling author, Nickolas Butler, at the Moline Public Library on Thursday at 6 p.m.

OurQuadCities.com See award-winning films free on Thursdays at Figge Art Museum OurQuadCities.com

See award-winning films free on Thursdays at Figge Art Museum

The Figge Art Museum presents "Film at the Figge," four remarkable award-winning films this fall that deal with death, loss and grief in unexpected ways. Admission will be free to the movies that will be shown in the John Deere Auditorium. After the movie, film goers will gather in the lobby outside the auditorium, where they can have a glass of wine and discuss the film. Here's a look at the lineup: Thursday, September 29, 2022, 6:30pm - 8:30pm Departures (2008) A professional cellist is left jobless when his Tokyo orchestra disbands. Looking for work, he answers a classified ad with the headline "Departures" that he believes to be a position with a travel agency, a job that will change the course of his life.   Awards: ·       Academy Award: Best Foreign Language Film (2009) ·       Japanese Academy Awards (10 wins; 13 nominations): Best Film, Director, Actor, Screenplay, Cinematography, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXTP_wRSHQw COMING IN OCTOBER, NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER Thursday, October 27, 2022, 6:30pm - 8:30pm Foxtrot (2017) A Tel Aviv couple receive word that their son, a soldier, has died in the line of duty.  Awards: ·       Venice International Film Festival: Grand Jury Prize ·       Israeli Academy Awards (8 wins; 11 nominations): Best Picture, Director, Actor, Cinematography, Editing ·       Academy Awards: Israel’s nomination for Best Foreign Language Film Trailer: https://youtu.be/wrBEDEmUceM Thursday, November 17, 2022, 6:30pm - 8:30pm It's Only the End of the World (2016) A playwright returns from Paris to visit his family in a small town in France after an absence of 12 years to inform them that he is dying.   Awards: ·       Cannes Film Festival: Grand Prix Award ·       French Academy Awards (3 wins; 6 nominations): Best Director, Best Actor, Editing ·       Canada Academy Awards (6 wins; 8 nominations): Best Picture, Director, Cinematography, Screenplay Trailer: https://youtu.be/8xTAAh2Dqpc Thursday, December 15, 6:30pm - 8:30pm Drive My Car (2021) Two years after his wife’s unexpected death, a renowned stage actor and director receives an offer to direct a play at a theater festival in Hiroshima. The festival assigns a young woman to chauffeur him in his beloved red Saab 900. With her help, he begins to face the haunting mysteries his wife left behind. Awards: ·       Academy Awards (1 win; 4 nominations): Best Foreign Language Film (2022) ·       Cannes Film Festival: Three awards, including Best Screenplay ·       Golden Globe: Best Picture, Non-English Language Trailer: https://youtu.be/6BPKPb_RTwI For more information, visit here.

WQAD.com Former Quad City resident shares her first hurricane experience WQAD.com

Former Quad City resident shares her first hurricane experience

Lili Sheedy shares her experience with preparation for Hurricane Ian's arrival

WQAD.com King's Harvest donates over 100 tanks of gas to Quad Cities residents WQAD.com

King's Harvest donates over 100 tanks of gas to Quad Cities residents

With a lengthy line of cars, it took less than an hour before King's Harvest hit its quota of donating $4,000.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Moline Police investigating after 2 cars found submerged in the Mississippi River

Police say the vehicles, which have been resting on the riverbed for multiple years, have been identified as stolen from 2006 and 2013 theft cases.

WQAD.com Quad Cities residents have multiple options available to enhance their home's  energy efficiency WQAD.com

Quad Cities residents have multiple options available to enhance their home's energy efficiency

Increasing residential energy efficiency can be achieved through switching to a heat pump, adjusting their thermostats a single degree and more.

OurQuadCities.com 'In the QC' podcast shows what makes QCA special OurQuadCities.com

'In the QC' podcast shows what makes QCA special

We all know why the Quad Cities are such a unique and wonderful place to call home, and now, thanks to the Quad Cities Chamber and a new podcast, the rest of the world can find out too. Lindsay O'Brien, marketing and social media manager for the Quad Cities Chamber, talked with Local 4 to tell us all about the 'In the QC' podcast. For more information, click here.

OurQuadCities.com Training offered to help prevent sexual abuse OurQuadCities.com

Training offered to help prevent sexual abuse

It takes a village to raise a child and to protect them from abuse. Kinna Hodges from Kinna's House of Love stopped by Local 4 to tell us about a partnership with EveryChild to offer Stewards of Children training to help protect children from sexual abuse. To register, click here.

OurQuadCities.com 3 area cities receive federal law enforcement grants OurQuadCities.com

3 area cities receive federal law enforcement grants

Three cities in Illinois’ 17th Congressional District are the recipients of over $285,000 in federal grants for their law enforcement departments. Congresswoman Cheri Bustos announced that Moline, Peoria and Rockford will receive a total of $285,866 in federal grants for law enforcement technical support. The grants come from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program.  “It’s vital that our local law enforcement officials have the tools and resources necessary to keep folks safe,” said Congresswoman Bustos. “This year’s JAG grants will help police departments in Moline, Peoria and Rockford improve technical support for officers and upgrade outdated equipment to help them best serve their communities.”  Moline will receive a total of $30,309 while Peoria will receive $84,855 and Rockford will receive $170,722. The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program is the leading source of federal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions. The program provides states, tribes and local governments with funding to support a range of program areas, including law enforcement, prosecution, indigent defense, courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, planning, evaluation, technology improvement, and crime victim and witness initiatives and mental health programs and related law enforcement and corrections programs, including behavioral programs and crisis intervention teams.

OurQuadCities.com New digital art exhibit to open at Figge OurQuadCities.com

New digital art exhibit to open at Figge

Is digital art really art? Will there be a museum dedicated to the Information Age? A new exhibiti opening Saturday at the Figge examines these questions. Message from Our Planet: Digital Art from the Thoma Collection, curated by the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Foundation, brings together 20 unique software, video, and light-technology artworks created by a diverse group of international artists working at the forefront of digital and electronic art, according to a Figge Art Museum release. The new exhibition proposes that media technologies — from vintage devices to cutting-edge digital algorithms — offer distinct ways for artists to communicate with future generations. One of the pieces in the new exhibit is by Robert Wilson, LADY GAGA: Mademoiselle Caroline Rivière, 2013, high-definition video on plasma monitor, music by Michael Galasso, © Robert Wilson, photo by RW Work LTD / Julian Mommert “The theme for this exhibition came to me while I was thinking about time capsules, especially the need for humans to be remembered through our objects and our actions,” said Curator Jason Foumberg. “Artists want to feel seen, heard, and have a legacy.” The exhibit, organized like a time capsule, proposes that artworks may, in theory, be reconstituted from their digital code by future generations and reflect the artifacts and ambitions of contemporary society, the Figge release said. Included in the exhibit are works by artists Brian Bress, Lia Chaia, Sabrina Gschwandtner, Hong Hao, Matthew Angelo Harrison, Claudia Hart, Jenny Holzer, Eduardo Kac, Lee Nam Lee, Christian Marclay, Paul Pfeiffer, Tabita Rezaire, Michal Rovner, Jason Salavon, Elias Sime, Skawennati, Penelope Umbrico, United Visual Artists, and Robert Wilson. “The Figge presents over 18 exhibitions annually, but this exhibition will be our first opportunity in the museum’s history to feature a group of works by such pioneering and cutting-edge artists,” said Director of Collections and Exhibitions Andrew Wallace. “Many of these works are time based digital video, film, and animation works so we encourage visitors to spend time with each to observe the fascinating and dynamic stories they have to tell.” Thoma Foundation Director Holly Harrison added, “The exhibition's theme and international checklist touches on aspects of culture and human achievement that unite communities across the globe.” The Figge Art Museum is at 225 W. 2nd St., Davenport. Message from our Planet is locally sponsored by supporting sponsor American Bank & Trust and contributing sponsor Carolyn Levine & Leonard Kallio Trust. It will be on view through Dec. 31, 2022 in the Figge’s fourth-floor gallery. Curator Jason Foumberg will give a free talk on Thursday, Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. Foumberg is the Thoma Foundation Curator of Digital & Media Art. Since 2014, he has curated annual exhibitions at the Foundation’s public spaces in Santa Fe and Chicago, as well as touring exhibits of digital art with U.S. museum partners. For more information on the Figge, click HERE. 

OurQuadCities.com Local airports win top prizes from IL OurQuadCities.com

Local airports win top prizes from IL

Six airports have received Airport of the Year awards from the Illinois Department of Transportation. The awards were presented September 27 during the Illinois Public Airports Association Fall Conference in Galena. “Aviation is vital to our state’s economy and a pillar of our multimodal system that makes us the North American transportation hub we are today,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Omer Osman. “Our aviation partners support a variety of industries and make numerous contributions to enhance the quality of life in Illinois. We present these awards as tokens of recognition and gratitude for their efforts.” The airports were selected because of their accomplishments, including an outstanding partnership with IDOT and a strong commitment to customer safety and satisfaction. Other award considerations include cooperation and coordination with the state, safety record, maintenance of the facility, promotion of aviation and educational events. The 2022 recipients are: Central Illinois Regional Airport (Bloomington/Normal)                                                                  Primary Airport of the Year DuPage Airport                                   Reliever Airport of the YearGreater Kankakee Airport                   General Aviation Airport of the Year (Runway greater than 5,000 feet)Dixon Municipal Airport                     General Aviation Airport of the Year (Runway less than 5,000 feet)Erie Airpark                                         Private Airport of the YearAbbVie Heliport (North Chicago)       Heliport of the Year Illinois has 100 public-use airports and heliports, with almost 3,000 aircraft registered with the Federal Aviation Administration. The system of airports supports more than 492,000 jobs, with a combined payroll of $21.9 billion and a total economic impact of $95.4 billion. Across the state, there are over 700 aviation facilities, including heliports, balloon, glider and ultra-light landing facilities and grass landing strips. To learn more about aviation in Illinois and the Illinois Aviation System Plan, click here.

OurQuadCities.com QC man sentenced to prison on child pornography charges OurQuadCities.com

QC man sentenced to prison on child pornography charges

A 33-year-old Eldridge man was sentenced Monday to 15 years in prison on child-pornography charges. Nicholas Robert Walker-Bennett was sentenced to 180 months in prison after his plea to a charge of receipt and distribution of child pornography, according to a news release from the U. S. Attorney's Office - Southern District of Iowa. Walker-Bennett was ordered to pay $3,000 in restitution to each of his 14 victims, totaling $42,000. According to court documents, a cybertip received by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children traced back to Walker-Bennett. Walker-Bennett admitted to using a social media application for the exchange of child pornography. Further investigation also revealed that Walker-Bennett engaged in similar conduct for more than 11 years, taking many steps to conceal his crime by setting up numerous email addresses. U. S. Attorney Richard D. Westphal of the Southern District of Iowa made the announcement. The Scott County Sheriff’s Office investigated the case, which was prosecuted by the U. S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Iowa as part of the Department of Justice’s “Project Safe Childhood” initiative, which was started in 2006 as a nationwide effort to combine law enforcement investigations and prosecutions, community action, and public awareness to reduce the incidence of sexual exploitation of children. The evidence On Tuesday, Sept. 14, an Eldridge man was arrested on charges of sexual exploitation of a minor and possession of child pornography. The Scott County Sheriff’s Office received a cybertip from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) which initiated an investigation, according to a release from the sheriff’s office. During the investigation, Walker-Bennett was developed as the suspect. Through the investigation, information was obtained for criminal charges of sexual exploitation of a minor. Evidence was obtained that Walker-Bennett possessed and promoted child pornography, the release said. A search warrant was executed on the defendant’s house and person. Walker-Bennett’s cell phone was found to have a large amount of visual depictions of minors engaged in sex acts. Many photos and videos were located on the device specifically depicting infants, prepubescent, and pubescent males and females engaged in sex acts, according to the arrest affidavit. Walker-Bennett used a digital communication service (Kik Messenger) to knowingly transmit material visually depicting the live performance of a minor engaged in a sex act, the affidavit says.

OurQuadCities.com Police: Suspect asked for jumper cables, then took victim's purse OurQuadCities.com

Police: Suspect asked for jumper cables, then took victim's purse

A 39-year-old Davenport man faces a felony charge after police say he asked a victim if she had jumper cables, then took off with her purse. Terry Holst Jr., who was arrested on a warrant, faces a charge of second-degree robbery, court records say. Shortly after 8 a.m. Sept. 14, Davenport Police responded to the 1100 block of Grand Avenue after a report of an armed robbery. The victim was able to provide a license plate for the suspect vehicle, an arrest affidavit says. Officers found the suspect vehicle and discovered the victim's property in the rear cargo area. Throughout the investigation, officers were able to determine Holst Jr. was outside of the suspect vehicle, which was parked in the 1100 block of Grand Avenue at the time of the incident, the affidavit says. According to the affidavit, Holst Jr. approached the victim and asked her if she had jumper cables. When the victim said no, Holst Jr. continued to approach her and reach for her purse. He held a black object in his right hand that the victim believed to be a handgun. The victim initially tried to prevent Holst Jr. from taking the purse, but after seeing what she believed to be a firearm she became fearful of immediate serious injury and let go of the purse. Holst Jr. was able to force the purse from the victim before he entered the passenger side of the suspect vehicle and left the area southbound on Grand Avenue, according to the affidavit. The victim's purse contained her identification and Social Security cards, bank cards, a checkbook, and $1,000 cash. The victim suffered minor injuries that resulted from Holst Jr. forcing the purse from her person, the affidavit says. Holst Jr. is being held on $10,000 cash-only bond in Scott County Jail. He is set for a preliminary hearing Oct. 7 in Scott County Court. Second-degree robbery is a Class C felony, which carries a sentence of no more than 10 years.

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Frost Advisory In Effect Tonight For Parts of Iowa & Illinois

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OurQuadCities.com Bettendorf Police: Suspect had loaded gun, marijuana, in car where he slept OurQuadCities.com

Bettendorf Police: Suspect had loaded gun, marijuana, in car where he slept

A 45-year-old Bettendorf man is behind bars after police say he had a loaded gun and marijuana in a car where they found him sleeping in a motel parking lot. Andrew Phillips faces felony charges of control of a firearm by a felon and having no drug tax stamp, and serious misdemeanor charges of possession of a controlled substance - marijuana - first offense and person ineligible to carry dangerous weapons, court records say. Shortly after 12:45 a.m. Tuesday, police saw Phillips sleeping in the front passenger seat of a 2008 Chevrolet Impala in the Ramada Inn parking lot at Spruce Hills Drive and Utica Ridge Road, according to arrest affidavits. Before Phillips woke up, officers saw a marijuana blunt in plain view on the center console of the vehicle near the gear shifter. Dispatchers told officers Phillips had two active arrest warrants for contempt of court, affidavits say. According to affidavits, when officers did a probable-cause search of the vehicle, they found: In the driver's door: a marijuana pipe containing raw marijuana residue and 2.05 grams of loose marijuana.In the glove box: a Taurus revolver (.38) loaded with six roundsIn a black backpack on the back right passenger seat: a marijuana pipe containing burnt residue on an exterior backpack pocket and 10 .38 Special rounds on an exterior backpack pocketIn a green "Ralph's fun bag" pouch inside of the backpack: 79.03 grams total package weight of raw marijuana and a digital scale. After he was read his Miranda Rights, Phillips admitted the gun was his and acknowledged he had been convicted of a prior felony. He admitted the black backpack was his and specifically admitted the marijuana (79.03 grams total packaged weight) in the backpack was his. None of the marijuana was affixed with a drug tax stamp, affidavits say. Phillips, who is being held on $5,000 cash-only bond in Scott County Jail, is set for a preliminary hearing Oct. 7 in Scott County Court.

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Oktoberfest Celebrations Coming Up In Moline & Davenportthere

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OurQuadCities.com Country star, QC native Margo Price to do book signing in Iowa City OurQuadCities.com

Country star, QC native Margo Price to do book signing in Iowa City

Aledo native and country singer-songwriter Margo Price will read from and talk about her new memoir, “Maybe We'll Make It” on Oct. 22 in Iowa City. Price, a 39-year-old Aledo native, will appear at Prairie Lights (15 S. Dubuque St., Iowa City) at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, as part of her national book tour. Margo Price performs in 2019 at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tenn. (Photo by: Katherine Bomboy/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images) “Maybe We’ll Make It” (published by University of Texas Press) is a memoir of loss, motherhood, and the search for artistic freedom in the midst of the agony experienced by so many aspiring musicians: bad gigs and long tours, rejection and sexual harassment, too much drinking and barely enough money to live on, according to a synopsis. Price refused to break, and turned her lowest moments into the classic country songs that eventually comprised the debut album that launched her career,. 2016's "Midwest Farmer's Daughter." In her authentic, acclaimed voice, Price shares the stories that became songs, and the small acts of love and camaraderie it takes to survive in a music industry that is often unkind to women. Now a Grammy-nominated “Best New Artist,” Price tells a love story of music, collaboration, and the struggle to build a career while trying to maintain her singular voice and style. Country legend and Price's friend Willie Nelson says of the new memoir: “Margo's book hits you right in the gut—and the heart—just like her songs.” The cover of Margo Price's forthcoming album, "Strays," due out Jan. 13, 2023. Price has released three LPs (her fourth, "Strays," will be out in January 2023); earned a Grammy nomination for Best New Artist, performed on Saturday Night Live, and is the first female musician to sit on the board of Farm Aid. When she was 19 years old, she dropped out of Northern Illinois University and moved to Nashville to become a musician. She busked on the street, played open mics, and even threw out her TV so that she would do nothing but write songs. She met Jeremy Ivey, a fellow musician who would become her closest collaborator and her husband. But after working on their craft for more than a decade, Price and Ivey had no label, no band, and plenty of heartache. In 2010, she gave birth to twin boys, one of whom died shortly after birth. On June 4, 2019, Price gave birth to their third child, a girl. The cover of Price's 2020 album, "That's How Rumors Get Started." According to a recent piece in Rolling Stone, she released her new album’s first single, “Been to the Mountain,” in August. Along with the announcement of "Strays," Price dropped the new song “Change of Heart” and its accompanying video. An intense, blues-influenced psych-rock tune, “Change of Heart” looks at reckoning and acceptance. “I quit trying to change your mind/I had a change of heart,” Price sings, with organ buzzing all round her, Rolling Stone said. Co-produced by Price with Jonathan Wilson, Strays was recorded largely in California’s Topanga Canyon in 2021 and expands on her signature mix of country, rock & roll, soul, and more. Van Etten shows up on “Radio,” while Campbell adds guitar on “Light Me Up." Price's 2023 tour will not bring her to the Quad Cities, but she will be fairly close -- on Feb. 20 in Madison, Wis., and Feb. 21 in Chicago. To see the video for "Been To The Mountain," click HERE. For more information on the artist, click HERE.

OurQuadCities.com Monmouth College to honor alumni, 1 family at Homecoming OurQuadCities.com

Monmouth College to honor alumni, 1 family at Homecoming

Homecoming Weekend is going to be busier than usual at Monmouth College this year. They’ll be inducting two new members into their Hall of Achievement and recognize several other individuals and one family during its Alumni Impact Awards and two other graduates during a ceremony for the Fraternity and Sorority Alumni Hall of Fame. Both ceremonies will be part of Homecoming weekend festivities at the College, running from September 30 through October 2. The Alumni Impact Awards start at 5 p.m. on September 30, while the Fraternity and Sorority Alumni Hall of Fame begins at 11:30 a.m. on October 1.In between the ceremonies, the Fighting Scots' undefeated 1972 football team will be honored as the inaugural members of the College's Fighting Scots Champions Club at 7:30 p.m. on September 30 and three new members will be inducted into the College's M Club Hall of Fame at 8:30 a.m. on October 1.The Alumni Impact Awards ceremony will be held in Mellinger Commons on the lower level of the Center for Science and Business. The other three ceremonies will be held in the Huff Athletic Center fieldhouse. All four events are free and open to the public.The recipients of honors at the Alumni Impact Awards are:Joel Hillison '83 - Distinguished Alumnus AwardThe Gen. Colin Powell Chair of Military and Strategic Studies at the United States Army War College, Hillison serves as the director for its "National Security Policy and Strategy" course. He is responsible for the development of more than two dozen faculty members in this position. He has taught courses on strategic leadership, war and military strategy and regional issues and interests.Before becoming an award-winning teacher, Hillison was comptroller and deputy chief of staff of resource management for multinational forces in Iraq for one year. He previously held a three-year post as comptroller for NATO's Combined Joint Planning Staff in Belgium, overseeing a $118 million budget as he worked with all 19 NATO countries. He holds a doctorate in international relations from Temple University. He earned two master's degrees, one in strategic studies from the United States Army War College and the other in economics from the University of Oklahoma.Ed Wimp - Distinguished Young Alumnus AwardWimp earned a master's degree in business and a law degree, both with the goal of being the "go-to" entertainment attorney. He has worked as a road manager for Earth Wind and Fire and has traveled as part of A$AP Rocky's management team.Wimp is the author of “Building Fans, Fame and Wealth: The 18 Revenue Streams of Music”, which has been used as a textbook in high schools. He speaks annually at the Self Employment in the Arts (SEA) conference in Chicago, encouraging young artists to have the courage to pursue their dreams and showing them how to build their careers. Wimp works with underprivileged individuals, helping them understand how to set up businesses. He also mentors adolescent and teenage boys, many of whom do not have positive male role models in their lives, and helps them get on track toward furthering their education and preparing themselves for success.Joan Wertz - Distinguished Service AwardWertz was called the “pillar of the institution” by her nominator and has been a member of the College's psychology faculty since 2001. She helped grow her department and was a driving force behind the creation of the Global Public Health minor. She was appointed to the COVID-19 campus leadership task force, which was established to develop and execute the College's response to the pandemic. She also played an active role in the Fall 2020 Planning Committee and devoted her time and energy to ensuring that as many classes as possible would be held in-person on campus.Wertz was recently appointed Associate Dean of Academic Success, having previously served as the longtime chair of her department and the chair of the Faculty Senate for multiple terms. She has also led several student trips, regularly spending her breaks accompanying students on international short-term study abroad experiences.The Mary Ann Thome Johnson Family - Family of the YearThe matriarch of the family, Mary Ann Thome Johnson, died at the age of 97 died less than a year ago. Mary Ann followed her father, the Rev. James Thome, a Presbyterian minister, to Monmouth. A member of the Class of ‘45, she met her husband, Roger Johnson '44, at Monmouth.The couple had two children, Hall of Achievement inductee Maj. Gen. Stephen Johnson and Emily Johnson, who graduated from Monmouth in 1972 and 1976, respectively. Both of their children married Monmouth students. Steve married another member of the Class of 1972, Lucy Hyde, and Emily's husband is former Monmouth Board of Trustees member Grant Minor, Class of ‘74. Their daughter, Katie Minor, is a 2004 Monmouth graduate.Michelle Holschuh Simmons - Hatch Award for Excellence in TeachingSince joining Monmouth's educational studies faculty in 2015, Simmons has helped many prospective teachers find their way through the complexities of certification and the challenges of classroom management. She is regularly cited for her rigor and her empathy, qualities which help her students succeed in the Monmouth classroom, as well as when they are teaching students themselves.As a longtime first-year experience teacher and a member the College's Faculty Senate, Simmons "has found ways to influence the campus beyond her disciplinary bound," wrote her nominator. "She is a force on campus, and her contributions to the lives of Monmouth College students, and the College overall, are striking."Simmons has a doctorate in language, literacy and culture from the University of Iowa and has examined the learning processes of undergraduate students, using the framework of threshold concepts to understand the points of struggle that students encounter while they move from novices to experts in their chosen fields.The graduates who will be recognized at the Fraternity and Sorority Hall of Fame ceremony are:Mary Grable McLeod '87As the quality manager in the laboratory at Stanford Health Care Center in Palo Alto, California, McLeod uses the education she received at Monmouth and at one of its academic partners, Rush University in Chicago, where she earned a degree in medical technology. But she was also significantly influenced at Monmouth by her involvement with Pi Beta Phi, an association she continues as an active alumnae member. At the time of her induction, she served as the membership coordinator for Palo Alto's Pi Beta Phi Alumnae Club and as the social media chair for the San Mateo (California) Alumnae Panhellenic Club.In 2021, McLeod received the Carolyn Helman Lichtenberg Crest Award, which recognizes Pi Beta Phi alumnae for community service or professional achievement.Mary Ann Larsen Zimmerman '88The organizational and leadership skills that Zimmerman developed as a member of Kappa Delta have served her well. Immediately after graduation from Monmouth, she began work as an HR professional. She has been a human resources business partner at Always Designing for People in Tempe, Arizona, since 1997.Her leadership roles with Kappa Delta grew from serving as pledge class secretary and chapter secretary to president of the Monmouth chapter her senior year. Zimmerman has stayed active as a Kappa Delta leader as an alumna. At the time of her induction, she was chapter adviser for Arizona State University and in 2019, she served as a delegate for Kappa Delta's national convention.

OurQuadCities.com Filling up for free: $4,000 in gas given away OurQuadCities.com

Filling up for free: $4,000 in gas given away

Kings Harvest gave away $4,000 in free gas on Tuesday. "Just trying to bless the community," Kings Harvest Director Terri Gleize said. "We have some extra money and we were just hoping to help some people out since gas prices are so high." Customers lined up for blocks to take advantage. window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"8027827","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p2","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","version":"5.2.0","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D8027827%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3D1%26pagetype%3Dsubindex%26hlmeta%3Dlocal%20news"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI4MDI3ODI3IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NjQzMDg1MDh9.BxjT1JHPEUaXbHEqoMpYQIKTG2q5bnpiZ6BVqEX04uo","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/8027827?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E5ii7dpsFakS%2BNiZXYl%2BkWrloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60,"isPermutiveEnabled":true}); Kings Harvest posted on social media earlier this month that they were "in search of a gas station to give us the opportunity to help others with the gift of gas. We are looking to pre-pay a few pumps one afternoon for a couple hours to help out the community." Dittmer's Service on Locust Street in Davenport answered the call. As Kings Harvest explained in a news release, the extra money arrived after Word of Faith Tabernacle Senior Pastor Jim Swope died. Swope, who also was the founder and director of Timothy's House of Hope, left $75,000 to Kings Harvest. We'll talk to customers who benefited from the giveaway on Local 4 News at 5. Kings Harvest Director Terri Gleize (Sierra Searcy, OurQuadCities.com)

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Bustos: 17,900 jobs have been created in district in last two years

U.S. Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Moline) today highlighted a new report from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee that shows how policies she has championed over the last two years have created 17,900 better-paying jobs in Northwest and Central Illinois.  “Over the last two years, we’ve passed historic legislation to create jobs and strengthen our economy. Today, I’m proud to report that our policies have resulted in 17,900 good-paying jobs in Northwest and Central Illinois,” Bustos said of jobs in the 17th Congressional District. “From the American Rescue Plan and the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to the CHIPS and Science Act and the Inflation Reduction Act, President Biden and Congressional Democrats have led the way toward historic job creation.”  U.S. Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Moline). The new data from the Joint Economic Committee demonstrates that policies have supported: Historically Strong Job Creation: Data show that 17,900 jobs have been created in Illinois’ 17th Congressional District since President Biden came into office. A total of 375,500 jobs have been created statewide.Manufacturing Jobs: As of August, 1,500 manufacturing jobs have been created in Illinois’ 17th Congressional District since President Biden came into office. Statewide, more than 22,400 manufacturing jobs have been created.Clean Energy Jobs: Last year, 22,000 workers in the 17th district were employed in clean energy and emerging sectors of the economy and an additional 36,000 worked in occupations that will be increasingly in demand as the United States transitions to cleaner, more secure energy.Business Growth: Last year, 5,400 applications to start a new business were filed in Illinois’ 17th Congressional District, up from an average of 3,100 per year pre-pandemic. There were 198,800 business applications filed in Illinois, up from 107,300 before the pandemic. Among the many job-creating measures that Bustos said she's championed are: The American Rescue Plan, which put shots in arms, got kids back in schools and jumpstarted our economic recovery.The CHIPS and Science Act, which fixes our supply chains and makes more critical goods in America.The Inflation Reduction Act, which includes historic investments in clean, secure American energy.The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which is rebuilding our roads, bridges and transit systems, bringing broadband to every community and replacing lead pipes and cleaning up drinking water.

WQAD.com FOX's 'Big Noon Kickoff' returns to Iowa City as the Hawkeyes host #4 Michigan WQAD.com

FOX's 'Big Noon Kickoff' returns to Iowa City as the Hawkeyes host #4 Michigan

The college football pre-game show makes the trip to Iowa City for the second straight season as Iowa hopes to avenge their 2021 Big Ten Championship Game loss.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Rock Island to begin crack and joint sealing construction Wednesday

The two streets on this year's program are 18th Avenue, 17th Street to the Moline Border and 38th Street, and 7th Avenue to Blackhawk Road. Work is expected to concluded within the next two weeks.

Quad-City Times Two vehicles spotted in river in Moline Quad-City Times

Two vehicles spotted in river in Moline

Divers discovered two long-ago stolen vehicles in the Mississippi River off the Ben Butterworth Parkway in Moline this week.

OurQuadCities.com QC road work may cause travel delays OurQuadCities.com

QC road work may cause travel delays

The City of Rock Island has announced work will begin on sealing cracks and joints on some area roads. Beginning Wednesday, September 28, work will start on the following: 18th Avenue17th Street to the Moline border and 38th Street7th Avenue to Blackhawk Road According to a release, no parking on the street will be allowed while the contractor is working in each area. Access to residential and commercial properties will be maintained as much as possible, but there will be periods when this is not possible, due to the contractor working directly in front of the drive and the filler material drying. Travel delays can be expected at or near the work zones. Drivers are reminded to follow all posted construction signs and flaggers and watch for trucks entering and leaving the construction zone. Work on this contract is expected to conclude within one to two weeks.

OurQuadCities.com 4 Your Money | Ratings OurQuadCities.com

4 Your Money | Ratings

It’s time for 4 Your Money! We were joined by John Nelson, Financial Advisor at NelsonCorp Wealth Management to talk about the negative reaction from the Federal Reserve’s latest rate height.

OurQuadCities.com East Moline Community Fund awards grants to local nonprofits OurQuadCities.com

East Moline Community Fund awards grants to local nonprofits

The East Moline Community Fund Committee has approved $18,000 in funding for thirteen area nonprofit organizations. The Fund receives and administers charitable gifts and supports citizens who are working on their goals of improving the community.  “The East Moline Community Fund members are privileged to provide these grants that will help build a stronger and more vibrant East Moline by supporting the tremendous work of our local nonprofit organizations,” says committee chair Connie Dowsett. “Through the generous donations and legacy gifts of our donors, we can support our community not only today, but for many years to come.” Grants were approved for the following groups and programs: Bethany for Children & Families - $2,000 for their Give Kids A Smile mobile dental clinic Children’s Therapy Center of the Quad Cities - $1,500 for East Moline children therapy Christ United Methodist Church - $1,750 for East Moline and Silvis food pantry support EveryChild - $1,250 for Second Step child protection program Humility Homes & Services - $1,750 for emergency shelter services and supplies Junior Achievement of the Heartland - $500 for East Moline programs  Niabi Zoo and Forest Preserves - $1,250 for capital equipment for the rhino habitat Spring Forward Learning Center - $2,000 for 2023 Summer Camp for 100 East Moline youth STEAM on Wheels - $1,250 for youth enrichment programs at YouthHope Rock Island County Children’s Advocacy Center - $500 for website updates Transitions Mental Health Services - $1,500 for staff development Two Rivers YMCA - $1,000 for youth summer enrichment programs  Youth Service Bureau of Rock Island County - $1,750 for counseling services Grants will be awarded in a ceremony at the Rust Belt on Thursday, October 6. For more information on the East Moline Community Fund, click here.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Moline seeks information about submerged cars from 2006, '13

On Monday, Sept. 26, at approximately 9:43 a.m. a subcontractor dive team for Lunda Construction Company was doing underwater surveying along the shoreline next to Ben Butterworth Parkway when workers found two vehicles submerged in the Mississippi River near the 55th Street boat ramp. They notified the Moline Police Department, according to a Tuesday police release. One vehicle was identified as a Chevy pickup truck originally reported stolen in East Moline back in May 2013, police said, noting the other was a Chrysler sedan originally reported stolen in Moline in November 2006. Both vehicles are believed to have been in the river for many years, based on the river silt and mud content, the release said. The Moline Police Department is still conducting an investigation with the assistance of the Big River Rescue and Recovery Dive Team. Once the investigation is complete, the department will consult with the dive team and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the determination if the vehicles should be removed or left in the riverbed. No further information is available at this time. Anyone with information about these cases from 2006 or 2013 may contact Crime Stoppers at 309-762-9500, or use the smartphone application P3 Tips.

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Where The Buffalo Roam: Iowa VRBO Cabin On A Buffalo Ranch

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WQAD.com ABATE of Iowa and USMC Reserves to host 38th annual motorcycle run WQAD.com

ABATE of Iowa and USMC Reserves to host 38th annual motorcycle run

ABATE of Iowa, District 15 and the USMC Reserves are teaming up to deliver the holiday spirit to Quad Cities children with a ride and toy collection event.

OurQuadCities.com New pottery festival coming to Bishop Hill OurQuadCities.com

New pottery festival coming to Bishop Hill

A new pottery festival is coming to Bishop Hill, Ill., on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2022, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will take place on the north side of the village park, next to J. Goard Pottery. The Bishop Hill Pottery Festival will not only include pottery but other forms of art as well -- basketry, woodwork, stained glass, quilting, jewelry, and more, according to a Tuesday release. The Oct. 8 event will not only include pottery, but basketry, woodwork, stained glass, quilting, jewelry, and more. Many vendors will demonstrate from their booths, while even more demonstrations can be seen at J. Goard Pottery, at 204 Johnson St., next to P.L. Johnson’s Dining Room. This event begins at 10 a.m. but come early and get some tasty baked goods from the Special Kneads Bakery tent.  For more information, call Jeff Goard at 309-883-1035. The Bishop Hill Pottery Festival is sponsored by the Bishop Hill Heritage Association, Community State Bank, J. Goard Pottery, and Special Kneads Bakery of Galva.

OurQuadCities.com 2022 Student Hunger Drive kicks off soon OurQuadCities.com

2022 Student Hunger Drive kicks off soon

After last year’s Student Hunger Drive raised a record 734,781 meals, the Quad Cities event will return this year on Monday, Oct. 3, concluding Nov. 10. This year, with fewer food donations from USDA programs and manufacturers/distributors and increased costs for families, the Student Hunger Drive is "paramount to increasing the Food Bank’s supplies and varieties of food to distribute to community members in need," according to a Tuesday release from River Bend Food Bank. Since 1985, the Student Hunger Drive’s six-week “friendly competition” among area high schools has provided over 16 million meals to children and adults facing hunger in River Bend Food Bank’s 23-county service area. Last year, Quad Cities high school students collected a record 734,781 meals in the Student Hunger Drive, for the River Bend Food Bank's 23-county service area. This year, students from 15 area high schools will participate in the food and funds drive, which will engage them in meeting a crucial community need while introducing them to service and philanthropy, the release says. In the Hunger Drive, students plan and execute their own food and funds drives. They set goals for their school while “competing” with other area schools for the honor of being named top fundraisers in their school’s division. During this hands-on, leadership development experience, students receive education on hunger, learn about volunteerism, and work with the Food Bank and their neighborhood elementary and middle schools to organize their school’s drive. According to the most recent data through Feeding America’s Map the Meal Gap Study, hunger continues to be a prevalent issue that requires a community-wide response. In 2021, an estimated 53 million people (down from 2020’s estimate of 60 million, but still up over 30% from 2019) accessed food assistance programs across the U.S., showing that the work of food banks and local food pantries was and continues to be essential to prevent devastating food insecurity during this time of high inflation and economic instability. Jenny Colvin, chief development officer at River Bend Food Bank. “The Student Hunger Drive is a unique fundraiser in the Quad Cities,” said Jenny Colvin, chief development officer at River Bend Food Bank. “Getting students involved helps bring hunger education and awareness to the next generation of community leaders and helps bring in a variety of foods for people in need. At a time when the Food Bank is working harder to keep our shelves stocked for our pantries, the Student Hunger Drive is a great support.” How the Hunger Drive works From Oct. 3 to Nov. 10, students collect items in their neighborhoods and at their schools, holding special school events and challenges to collect monetary and food donations. Students package the collected food and deliver it to River Bend Food Bank’s Davenport warehouse at the end of the competition. QC students celebrated the end of the 2021 Student Hunger Drive last November at River Bend Food Bank, Davenport. Amounts are totaled and winning schools receive awards for 1st or 2nd place in their division, along with an award for the Mission Challenge Winner – the school that best exemplifies the mission of River Bend Food Bank. Students focus on not only collecting the most food but food that is nutritious and able to be used by their classmates who may be experiencing hunger. Key dates are: Monday, Oct. 3rd – Kick-Off Party, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m., River Bend Food Bank, 4010 Kimmel Drive, Davenport.Thursday, Nov. 10th – Loading Day, 8 a.m. – 3 p.m., River Bend Food Bank.Thursday, Nov. 10th – Finale Rally, 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., River Bend Food Bank. The 2022 Student Hunger Drive sponsors are The Bechtel Trusts, Hy-Vee, IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union, and the John Deere Foundation. The participating schools are Alleman High School, Assumption High School, Bettendorf High School, Davenport Central High School, Davenport North High School, Davenport West High School, Moline High School, Morning Star Academy, Orion High School, Pleasant Valley High School, Quad Cities Christian School, Rivermont Collegiate, Rock Island High School, Sherrard High School, and United Township High School. Last year, the winning schools were: Division C (up to 299 enrolled students): o 1st place – Rivermont Collegiate o 2nd place – Quad Cities Christian School Division B (300 to 1,250 enrolled students): o 1st place – Alleman High School o 2nd place – Orion High School Division A (over 1,250 enrolled students): o 1st place – Pleasant Valley High School o 2nd place – Bettendorf High School The 2021 “Mission Challenge Award” winner – school that showed the best connection of their school to the mission of River Bend Food Bank -- was Orion High School.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

AARP ‘Top 5 Scams’ tour comes to QC area

AARP Iowa, the Iowa Attorney General’s Office and the Iowa Insurance Division have announced stops in the Iowa Quad Cities area as part of a 14-city, statewide Fraud Watch education tour. Tour stops will feature an educational program on the Top 5 scams in Iowa, based on complaints submitted to the Iowa Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division. Participants will also have the chance to ask questions or share scams they’ve seen in their communities. These free events are open to the public, but registration is required; click here to sign up. All events include a light lunch or dinner. “Imposter scams are the number one scam affecting older Iowans and our goal is to educate the public on how to avoid scams and fraud,” said Brad Anderson, AARP Iowa State Director. “We are proud to partner with the Iowa Attorney General’s Office and Iowa Insurance Division to raise awareness of these popular scam tactics and make sure Iowans have the tools they need to protect themselves.” Upcoming Fraud Watch locations include: Ottumwa Fraud Watch Lunch Wednesday, September 28, 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Calvary Baptist Church 915 Overman Avenue in Ottumwa Burlington Fraud Watch Dinner Wednesday, September 28, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. 210 Court Street in Burlington Bettendorf Fraud Watch Lunch Thursday, September 29, 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Redeemer Lutheran Church 1107 Tanglefoot Lane in Bettendorf A full list of the tour dates and locations is available here.

OurQuadCities.com REVIEW: New Mockingbird show is powerful, heartbreaking, dazzling OurQuadCities.com

REVIEW: New Mockingbird show is powerful, heartbreaking, dazzling

The beautiful Mockingbird on Main in downtown Davenport keeps rocking it with new (original), passionate productions by local artists. Their latest, Alex Richardson's "Their Town" (a modern adaptation of the classic "Our Town") is a shining example of what all theater should be (and too often is not) -- bold, innovative, creative, thought-provoking, excellently acted, emotional and NEW! The cast of "Their Town" is comprised of (front row L-R) Louie Fischer, Emmalee Hillburn, Brittany Anderson and Drew DeKeyrel, and (back row L-R) Adam Cerny, Taylor Lynn Gravert and Alisha Hanes. I just love everything about this show, including the pain of not getting a happy ending. It takes chances; it’s funny, sad, and just about every feeling in between, and if you are human at all, you will relate to at least one of its many, many characters. The first brilliant move the prolific, 28-year-old Richardson (here director, playwright, sound and projection designer) makes is transforming the “stage manager” role of the play’s inspiration, the iconic “Our Town.” Thornton Wilder’s original 1938 Pulitzer winner takes place in fictional Grover’s Corners, N.H., between the years of 1901 and 1913. It’s a play within a play, and the stage manager acts as narrator, speaking directly to the audience. In “Their Town” (the eighth original play Richardson has had staged, and 14th he’s directed), the narrator is split into wise, warm guides “He” and “She,” perfectly played with calm confidence and poise by Adam Cerny and Taylor Gravert. Emmalee Hilburn and Adam Cerny in "Their Town." Ideal for (but not written for) this 37-seat, cabaret-style venue (with glittering, elegant light fixtures), Cerny and Gravert also quickly become a whole host of other roles in the vignette-form production. While they’re normally dressed in concert-style black and white, the pair easily put on outfits draped on stage – a shawl here and a hoodie there -- to help become other characters. Richardson wrote in the program – only available online – that part of why he wanted to update “Our Town” (listen for the title’s mention in dialogue) was because the action of the original is more than a century removed and feels awfully remote. He maintains the central message of Wilder: do not take life for granted; enjoy what you have before it’s gone -- but makes everything else more contemporary. He set the first act of “Their Town” in June 2019 and it first premiered at Playcrafters in Moline in early 2020, just before COVID shutdowns. It’s still set then, with the second half six months later. The only reference to the pandemic is the December 2019 appearance of a virus on the opposite end of the world – in response, “people collectively shrugged,” the play says. “What’s that got to do with me?” Louie Fischer plays Bernard and Alisha Hanes plays Cierra. “Their Town” still includes the young protagonists Emily and George, who take a different, tumultuous turn, and the deeply meaningful story has everything to do with us. The 20-something couple (he a traditional farm boy who wants to settle down in their town, and she a feisty, modern woman who wants to get out in a better life) are wonderfully embodied by the 20-year-old Drew DeKeyrel and 25-year-old Brittany Anderson. They are so natural and convincing in their parts, which truly make the characters come alive and you're invested in Emily and George. One of the many dramatic highlights of the show is after the wedding of college friends, when they dance, get drunk and have a knock-down, drag-out argument about whether or not to get married and have a family. George bought his parents' farm without telling Emily and he's hopelessly in love with her. Drew DeKeyrel plays George and Brittany Anderson is Emily. Emily is dying to get out of this dying, declining place (an unnamed Midwestern town), saying if she stays, it's like admitting defeat. They've lived their whole lives there and it's heartbreaking to watch this brutal fight, which takes on even weightier resonance as Emily looks back in the last act. Emmalee Hillburn plays the super sarcastic, cynical DJ Michelle, herself beaten down by struggles at her declining radio station. Like the other actors here, she totally owns the role -- and in the second act, Hillburn is mesmerizing in an extended monologue, about the rise and fall of her career (she's in her late 40s). She got the radio gig after a high school prank (when she did morning announcements) and is dying herself in the graveyard shift, midnight to 6 a.m., tired of doing the same thing over and over. Emmalee Hilburn plays Michelle, in a scene with Adam Cerny. Alisha Hanes is the no-nonsense Cierra, a 42-year-old divorced mother of two, looking for a job and a new lease on life. She is very down-to-earth and relatable, and one of the play's many highlights is a meditative scene she shares with Louie Fischer, making his acting debut as the gruff Bernard, who was forced by his family to move into a retirement home after his wife's death. A simple scene as the two of them sit and talk in a park (Bernard takes his shoes off and says "I hope I remember you tomorrow") is tender and poignant. Fischer and Hanes in a park scene in "Their Town." Fischer solidly captures the frustrations of growing old and wanting to maintain independence. Earlier, he and Gravert as his daughter bicker about the pros and cons of Bernard staying in his home. That is a hard topic anyone with retired parents can identify with. Taylor Gravert and Drew DeKeyrel dance as an alternative Emily and George. While "Their Town" is truly an ensemble show (with no clear lead role), Gravert and Cerny seem to have the most stage time, simply due to the litany of parts they play. Both have spectacular, magnetic stage presences -- she has a consistently dazzling smile, electric energy and variety of authoritative accents, and he has a direct, always affecting manner, with large, soulful eyes that can express so much even when Cerny doesn't say a word. The closing scene of the play alone is worth the price of admission (which is generously "Pay what you can"), set in an afterlife where the dead wait to go to their eternal rest in a DMV-like setting. That last scene -- with Gravert alone describing the result of a power outage where the town can finally see the blissfully starlit sky. Taylor Gravert in the closing scene of the play. The Mockingbird goes dark and Richardson with his expert light crew (Tristan Tapscott and Doug Kutzli) flood nearly the entire theater with a deep blue tint and tons of stars. It's the very definition of breathtaking. Do not miss your chance to see this smart, thoughtful, compassionate play. It continues Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 8 p.m. at Mockingbird on Main, 320 Main St., Davenport. For more information, click HERE.

OurQuadCities.com Head out on the highway to help Toys for Tots! OurQuadCities.com

Head out on the highway to help Toys for Tots!

Santa wants you to get your motor runnin' and help Toys for Tots! ABATE of Iowa - District 15 and the USMC Reserves invite you to participate in the 38th Annual Toys for Tots Motorcycle Run October 2. The event begins at 11:00 a.m. at Walmart, located at 3101 W. Kimberly Rd., Davenport. The ride leaves at 1:00 p.m. and ends at the former Hobby Lobby parking lot, located at 2121 Kimberly Rd., Bettendorf. Admission is one new toy per person, and the toys must be visible on the bike. Please note that stuffed animals are not allowed, due to health issues. No bike? No problem! Toys will be collected at the start and end of the ride. Make sure no child wakes up Christmas morning without a toy. The 38th Annual Toys for Tots Motorcycle Run is Saturday, October 2, beginning at 11:00 a.m. For more information, click here.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

No injuries in Borghi USA fire

No injuries were reported in a commercial fire in West Burlington yesterday afternoon. The Burlington and West Burlington Fire Departments were called to a structure fire at Borghi USA, 402 W. Division Street in West Burlington at about 4:22 p.m. on Monday, September 26. Firefighters arrived on scene to find heavy smoke coming from the west side of the commercial manufacturing facility and employees evacuating the building. Firefighters located the fire inside the west side door of the building and brought it under control within 10 minutes. Eleven Burlington Firefighters were assisted at the scene by eight West Burlington firefighters, the West Burlington Police Department and maintenance staff from Borghi USA. Three off-duty Burlington Firefighters reported for duty to cover additional calls. Employees activated the fire alarm system and attempted to control the fire with fire extinguishers. There were no injuries. The cause of the fire remains under investigation by the Burlington and West Burlington Fire Departments and is not considered suspicious. The facility did receive significant smoke damages and fire damage was limited to a small portion of the building. Damage estimates are not available at this time.

WQAD.com 3 Things to know | Quad Cities headlines for September 27, 2022 WQAD.com

3 Things to know | Quad Cities headlines for September 27, 2022

Moline police found two submerged cars in the Mississippi river and demolition of the Old I-74 Bridge commences.

WQAD.com Contest Rules: Show Us Your Fall Colors WQAD.com

Contest Rules: Show Us Your Fall Colors

Here are the rules for our fall colors contest that ends on Oct. 14.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Coalition to present concerns about proposed carbon capture pipeline to Knox County Board Wednesday

Navigator CO₂ Ventures proposed 1,300-mile long pipeline would run through five Midwestern states, including 13 counties in Illinois.

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Iowa’s Case Of ‘Brain Drain’ Among The Worst in The Nation

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OurQuadCities.com Former Scoutmaster, para-educator to appeal sexual-exploitation sentence OurQuadCities.com

Former Scoutmaster, para-educator to appeal sexual-exploitation sentence

A 46-year-old former para-educator and Scoutmaster, who was sentenced to a total of 10 years on sex-abuse charges, has filed a notice of appeal in Clinton County Court. Earlier, David Chad Baker, of Clinton, pleaded guilty to two counts of sexual exploitation by a school employee. On Sept. 1, Baker was sentenced to a total of up to 10 years – up to five years for each count. Before his sentencing, Baker received three letters of support from different people. Two – including one from a supporter who became an Eagle Scout under Baker’s supervision - mention Baker’s work as a Scoutmaster. Court records say Baker also was ordered to pay $1,025 on each count. The sentences will run consecutively – one after another, court records say. He will receive credit for time served in Clinton County Jail in connection with the case. “The Court makes no recommendation as to when the defendant shall be released from incarceration, leaving it to the Department of Corrections to determine based on (his) progress at the institution,” according to court documents. Baker filed a notice of appeal Sept. 23, according to Clinton County Court records. David Chad Baker (contributed photo) Two victims On March 12, 2020, a parent of a 17-year-old Clinton High School student contacted a school resource officer. The parent told him Baker, a substitute (para) teacher at Clinton High School, contacted her juvenile child in an inappropriate way, and that Baker sent naked pictures of himself to the student a few months prior, arrest affidavits say. According to affidavits, Baker told the officer he had contact with the student on Grindr in December of 2019. Baker said there was a conversation between him and the student on the site. Baker said he sent nude pictures of himself to the student through Grindr. Baker said he found out that the student was under 18 and stopped contact. Baker said he liked a few of the 17-year-old student's Instagram posts after the initial contact. Baker stated he never had direct contact with the student. The student told the officer he gave a false age on Grindr, according to affidavits. Baker said he began working as a para-educator at CHS in December of 2019. Baker said he subbed for a gym class in December of 2019 when he saw the student in the gymnasium. Arrest affidavits say that on Aug. 14, 2020, a school resource officer had contact with a 14-year-old Clinton High School student (Victim 2) “who had inappropriate contact with David Baker while Baker was an employee of the school.” According to affidavits, Victim 2 said Baker began contact around the end of November of 2019 after having contact on the website Grindr. Victim 2 said nude photos had been exchanged between the two. Victim 2 said contact continued with Baker through Snapchat. Victim 2 said Baker provided the student with a prepaid phone to continue contact. Victim 2 said Baker brought the phone to the school for usage during a CHS event. A check of messages on the phone showed conversations between Victim 2 and a phone number known to be Baker's that began on Feb. 18, 2020, affidavits say. Baker sexually assaulted the student multiple times, police say in arrest affidavits. Baker told police he got on Grindr while working in St. Louis, Missouri, as a barge captain.

OurQuadCities.com Railroad merger hearings to begin OurQuadCities.com

Railroad merger hearings to begin

Three days of hearings begin Wednesday focused on the proposed merger between Canadian Pacific and Kansas City Southern railroads. We're watching this closely in the Quad Cities because it could triple train traffic along the Mississippi River from Muscatine through the Quad Cities and Clinton. The Surface Transportation Board will hold the hearings in Washington D.C. Former Davenport Mayor Bill Gluba is among the speakers scheduled on the first day. He will have five minutes to address the board. It's not clear how soon the board will make a final decision on the merger.