QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Friday, July 1st, 2022

OurQuadCities.com Summer Concert Series presents The Velies OurQuadCities.com

Summer Concert Series presents The Velies

The Bettendorf Public Library’s Summer Concert Series returns with some hot music on summer nights. The Summer Concert Series free shows are every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. through August 11. Bring your lawn chairs and blankets and take in this year's line-up: July 7: The VeliesJuly 14: Crooked Cactus BandJuly 21: Avey Grouws BandJuly 28: Class of ‘82August 4: David G. SmithAugust 11: Soul Storm In case of inclement weather, the concerts will be inside the Library at 2950 Learning Campus Drive in the Bettendorf Room. For more information, click here.

Quad-City Times Fourth of July holiday closings Quad-City Times

Fourth of July holiday closings

Monday's Fourth of July holiday will alter schedules and close buildings for many public agencies.

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Births for Friday, July 1, 2022

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY MOLINE

OurQuadCities.com Linda Cook review: 'Elvis' rocks OurQuadCities.com

Linda Cook review: 'Elvis' rocks

“Elvis” rocks. That’s not surprising, considering that director Baz Luhrmann created a similarly dazzling film with his “Moulin Rouge!” With its eye-boggling images and turbo pace, the film pulses with the energy and the madness that was the life of The King. I love the beginning of the movie, which parallels an iconic scene in “Citizen Kane.” The story is narrated by Colonel Tom Parker (played by Tom Hanks.) We see Parker as he seeks the Next Big Thing, and we watch his face – and the faces of Elvis Presley’s already-adoring fans – when Elvis hits the stage. “Without me, there would be no Elvis Presley,” Parker says. Wisely, Luhrmann keeps the title character’s face turned away or in shadow until the show. Elvis (Austin Butler) sets the audience on fire with his gyrations, good looks and voice. (This is a glorious scene that deserves to be enjoyed on the big screen, as do many other sequences.) Parker worms his way into Elvis’s life, becoming the singer’s mentor and, some would say, master. Concerts, record deals and a stint in the U. S. Army lead to a series of movies. Then comes Vegas, drugs … and you probably know the rest, but that won’t stop you from being engaged with this film down to its very last musical note. As Elvis’s life transitions, so does the United States. We watch his life unfold against a background of political/racial unrest and a changing society. Music aficionados will appreciate how Elvis in his early years was influenced by Gospel music and the likes of Big Mama Thornton. This is a soundtrack that can’t be beat. Austin Butler is magical as Elvis. There should be an Oscar nomination in Butler’s future. Don’t go in expecting a documentary, because the movie takes some dramatic license here and there. But do expect to see and hear a whirlwind tale of a musician whose legacy continues. Long live The King. 3 ½ stars Rated: PG-13 for foul language, drug abuse and sexual situations. Running time: Two hours and 39 minutes. At Cinemark, Davenport; Regal, Moline; and Palms 10, Muscatine.

Thursday, June 30th, 2022

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Regional political experts split on real impacts of Jan. 6 hearings

As the House Committee on the Jan. 6, continues to subpoena former associates of President Donald Trump, experts are debating where the hearings are heading, and the ultimate impact they’ll have.

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City: Save your energy - and consider an aggregation program

Because of the ongoing volatility of energy rates, the City of Galesburg reminds residents and small commercial businesses of their option to participate in energy aggregation through Homefield Energy, a news release says. In 2021, the City of Galesburg entered into a new agreement with Homefield Energy for municipal aggregation of electricity supply. This was not the first agreement for municipal energy aggregation, as energy aggregation was approved by the citizen of Galesburg with the election in November 2012. Since that time, the City has successfully negotiated four municipal aggregation agreements on behalf of the residents, the release says.Enrollment in the aggregation program was automatic and users only needed to take action if they chose to opt-out of the program. The new agreement took effect with the July 2021 meter read date and will be active through the July 2024 meter read date. The agreement is for 100% renewable power at $0.05499 per kWh with Homefield Energy. Residents and small commercial businesses received a letter from the City of Galesburg c/o Homefield Energy when the agreement went into effect, which detailed the terms of the supply agreement. Other energy suppliers may solicit Galesburg residents and small commercial businesses via phone, mailings, or door-to-door to enroll with their company. Caution is recommended, as these suppliers are not the "supplier of choice" and may not be able to provide the same rates or assurances as Homefield Energy. Enrollment with Homefield Energy is automatic, so they will not be soliciting through any of the means listed above or request a resident to sign a contract. No matter who supplies the electricity, Ameren remains the delivery company. All Galesburg users would continue to contact Ameren in the case of outages, service calls, and emergencies, the release says.  Energy Aggregation FAQs 1.  How does the energy aggregation program work?Illinois law provides municipalities with the opportunity to assist their residents and small businesses in reducing their electricity costs. Municipalities can aggregate the electric load of their residential and qualifying small businesses into one, larger load and then solicit bids for electricity supply and related services for this larger group. These bids will reflect the electricity supply portion only; Ameren will continue to deliver the electricity across existing poles and wires.Additional information to evaluate the various electric supply options can be found on the Illinois Commerce Commission’s Plug In Illinois website: www.pluginillinois.org 2.  What is the benefit of energy aggregation?Municipal Electric Aggregation is a program that allows local governments to bundle - or aggregate - residential and small commercial retail electric accounts and seek bids for a lower cost supply of power. Energy aggregation was approved by the citizens of Galesburg during the November 2012 election. 3.  Who is the supplier for the energy aggregation program for Galesburg?Homefield Energy is the current supplier for the residential and small commercial aggregation program for the contract which took effect with the July 2021 meter read date and runs through the July 2024 meter read date.  4.  How do I enroll in the energy aggregation program?Enrollment was automatic for those already enrolled in prior aggregation programs, as well as those currently with Ameren for their supply of energy.Residents or small businesses currently under contract with an alternate electric supplier should review the terms of their agreement with that supplier to determine whether or not they are currently eligible to leave their contract without incurring any fees for terminating the contract. Only this small percentage of residents and small businesses who previously opted out and set up an agreement with an alternate supplier (not Homefield or Ameren) will not have been automatically enrolled in the energy aggregation program, and would need to contact Homefield directly to enroll, after verifying their options with their current alternative supplier.Homefield Energy is available by phone from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Monday through Friday at 1-866-694-1262 or via email at HomefieldCustCare@Dynegy.com.  Residents may also visit their website www.HomefieldEnergy.com for FAQs and community specific information.5.  What if I do not want to participate in the energy aggregation program?Residents who no longer wish to participate in the City of Galesburg’s energy aggregation program, may contact Homefield Energy to determine their current options to opt out of the program. 6.  What if I am solicited by an electricity supplier?Other energy suppliers may solicit Galesburg residents and small commercial businesses via phone, mailings, or door-to-door to enroll with their company. Caution is recommended, as these suppliers are not the "supplier of choice" and may not be able to provide the same rates or assurances as Homefield Energy. Enrollment with Homefield Energy is automatic, so they will not be soliciting through any of the means listed above. 7.  Who do I call if the power goes out?No matter who supplies the electricity, Ameren remains the delivery company. All Galesburg users would continue to contact Ameren in the case of outages, service calls, and emergencies. 8.  Who will my electricity bill come from?You will still receive a bill from Ameren with the new supplier charges included. The electricity will be provided by your supplier and the distribution through the power lines will be provided by Ameren, but you will still receive only one bill from Ameren for all services.

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Governor’s Race 2022: One on one with Bailey and Pritzker

A battle that started in 2020 with a downstate lawmaker challenging COVID-19 executive orders has become a fight for the governor’s office in November.

OurQuadCities.com Group O named to 50 Most Powerful Hispanic Businesses list OurQuadCities.com

Group O named to 50 Most Powerful Hispanic Businesses list

Negocios Now, a national award-winning publication focused on Hispanic business, has included Group O in its annual list of 50 Most Powerful Hispanic Businesses in its recent edition of “Who’s Who in Hispanic Business.” The list consists of top Hispanic-owned businesses making a clear difference in this country, a news release says. Gregg Ontiveros was recognized for turning Group O from a $50M business in 1999 into the $900+M diversified services firm it is today thanks to his entrepreneurial spirit and can-do philosophy. Ontiveros leads with a hands-on approach, remaining very involved in all facets of Group O's daily operations As the principal owner, Ontiveros has provided the vision necessary to attract marquee clients that represent a veritable who’s who of America’s most respected brands including AT&T, Michelin, PepsiCo, Caterpillar, and Samsung. Gregg Ontiveros (contributed photo.) Throughout his career, Ontiveros has mentored Hispanic and other minority and non-minority business owners and entrepreneurs. He has been candid about his lessons learned and is supportive in offering advice, referring individuals to other key contacts, collaborating to determine business opportunities with Group O, or matchmaking them with other businesses. “It is an honor to be included among so many other accomplished businesses,” Ontiveros said of Group O being named to the list. “As a business process outsourcer, Group O is an extension of our clients’ brands, and this recognition further strengthens our ongoing commitment to their success.” In addition to inclusion on the Negocios list, Ontiveros has previously been recognized by the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce as an HBE Hispanic Businessman of the Year, and earned a place on HispanicBusiness Inc.’s “50 Influentials.” About Group O: Group O is an end-to-end business process outsourcing provider specializing in supply chain, packaging, and incentive marketing solutions. Headquartered in Milan, Illinois, and major operations in Minnesota and Texas. Group O employs more than 1,200 professionals with diverse industry experience in optimizing inventory, materials, logistics, fulfillment, and customer engagement. Founded in 1974 as a small, family-run packaging company, Group O has grown into a thriving $900 million enterprise with world-class industry experience under the leadership of the Ontiveros family. For more information, visit here.

OurQuadCities.com Inflation hits animal shelters and rescues OurQuadCities.com

Inflation hits animal shelters and rescues

Animal shelters and rescues are seeing the effects of inflation first-hand. King's Harvest Pet Rescue No Kill Shelter has seen more pet owners surrender their four-legged fur friends, causing the shelter to stop helping other shelters at the moment. "Shelters that were pulling from down south are euthanizing more than normal because we can't pull from them, or other shelters can't hear from them because they're so full," said Vet Tech Gabrielle Weeks. According to Weeks, adoptions for cats and dogs also have decreased drastically. "Last month our adoptions were cut in half, so we only had 57 when we usually have about 100," said Weeks. President Meagan Koehler from It Takes a Village Animal Rescue and Resources said they are feeling the impact at the pump, especially since they travel out of state to help rescue animals from kill shelters. "Our transport costs have gone through the roof. It's higher than it's ever been, to the point where we really started on itemizing and figuring out where our greatest transportation expenses are - if it's back-and-forth to the vet. We're starting to track all of that individually because we have to see where we can cut these costs," said Koehler. "Taking this giant RV down there with you - you know that they're not known for being fuel-efficient so it's something that we've been giving a lot of thought to. Gas prices are crazy high, and then that's just the beginning of the way the inflation is affecting rescue." Celina Rippel from the Humane Society of Scott County said they've seen a decrease in monetary donations which makes it hard when helping out people who set up to foster their animals. "Not only are we seeing an increase in expenses,but because we have a decrease in donations, that's where we're starting to see a gap. And that's where things are starting to get a little bit harder," said Rippel. "We supply all of the supplies that fosters would need to foster animals, so that is also a big expense for us."

OurQuadCities.com Investigation into shooting at Casey's rules in favor of officer OurQuadCities.com

Investigation into shooting at Casey's rules in favor of officer

An officer's use of deadly force in a fatal shooting June 8 was justified. On Thursday at a news conference, investigators discussed a deadly shooting involving an officer and a man accused of tampering with an air conditioning unit at a convenience store. Officials said the officer's decision to use a deadly force was justified. The incident happened June 8 at the Casey's on West 53rd street in Davenport. Davenport Police say Officer Michael Catton tried to arrest suspect Jason Morales on previous warrants investigating the activity at Casey's. They got into a fight and shots were exchanged. At the hospital, Morales died from one of the four gunshots from the incident. On Thursday, Local 4 News was at a news conference at Scott County Courthouse, where investigators showed body camera footage from that night. They used the footage to explain why they believe Catton was justified in using his gun. Catton had some scratches from the incident, but otherwise was unharmed. . Catton remains on investigative leave. To watch body camera footage of the incident, click on the video below: window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7802898","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p1","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","version":"5.2.0","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7802898%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3D1%26pagetype%3Dsubindex%26hlmeta%3Dlocal%20news"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3ODAyODk4IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NTY2Mzc1MDd9.IemOWqbfGNW4nMtb9mcHnXKjsVGQKmUhy9lpkUaZfUo","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7802898?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6SC5c5sOZUS5PidXYlmhXrloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60,"isPermutiveEnabled":true});

WQAD.com Downtown Moline hotel gets rebrand, $2M makeover WQAD.com

Downtown Moline hotel gets rebrand, $2M makeover

The Wyndham Hotel in downtown Moline will see upgrades to bedding, TVs and the pool area.

WQAD.com John Deere working to make a "greener gator" WQAD.com

John Deere working to make a "greener gator"

The new concept vehicle showcased at the John Deere Classic is made of mostly recycled materials.

WQAD.com Scott County Attorney's Office: Davenport police officer justified in shooting of man at Casey's on June 8 WQAD.com

Scott County Attorney's Office: Davenport police officer justified in shooting of man at Casey's on June 8

The office released body camera footage that shows how the encounter escalated with Jason Morales drawing and firing a gun at Officer Michael Catton.

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CRIME STOPPERS: Bettendorf police investigate 3 adults, 7 puppies stolen near library

Bettendorf police are investigating 10 American Bully dogs stolen near the Bettendorf Public Library.

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CRIME STOPPERS: Rock Island police investigate hit-and-run crash injures child Sunday

Rock Island police are investigating a hit and run crash that injured a child riding a bike Sunday.

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After-dark Moonlight Chase in Eldridge returns on July 9

Eastern Iowa’s most unique road race and pinnacle event during the annual Eldridge Summer Festival is set for July 9.

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CRIME STOPPERS: Woman wanted in Scott County for failing to appear on theft charges

Have you seen her?

OurQuadCities.com Court upholds Liggins' sentence in 9-year-old's 1990 death OurQuadCities.com

Court upholds Liggins' sentence in 9-year-old's 1990 death

The godmother of a little girl slain more than 30 years ago may finally have peace after the Iowa Supreme Court announced Thursday it upheld the conviction of her killer. The body of 9-year-old Jennifer Lewis, of Rock Island, was discovered burning in a field near Jefferson Elementary School, 1027 N. Marquette St., Davenport, in 1990. Jennifer had been sexually abused and strangled.  Jennifer, who was buried on her 10th birthday, would have been 42 today. Stanley Liggins, who had been a friend of Jennifer's family, was sentenced to life without parole for the homicide. After four trials, the Iowa Supreme Court has affirmed Liggins’ sentence of life without parole. Liggins, who has always claimed he’s innocent, was first convicted of the murder in Scott County in 1993, but it was later overturned. Liggins’ second trial was held in Dubuque County in 1995, and he was once again convicted but it was later overturned. His third trial in 2018 resulted in a hung jury.  Now Jennifer’s godmother, Mary Maxwell-Rockwell, reflects on the little girl she loved so much and three decades of seeking justice. “She was just the girl-iest tomboy you could ever meet,” she said. She loved to wear pretty dresses and sandals, which sometimes ended up disheveled. “She had such a love for life, and people. She just was such a bright shining star,” even though she had some adversity in her life, Maxwell-Rockwell said. “The one thing she didn’t like was me brushing out her hair. Other than that, we were pretty close.” Jennifer couldn’t wait to be a big sister, Maxwell-Rockwell said. “Unfortunately she only got that role for about eight weeks. Loved her stepdad. Loved to go on the motorcycle. Loved to go ride her bike. Would make friends with anybody. I never saw her upset. She always had a smile and a hug.” Maxwell-Rockwell was acquainted with Liggins, too, although she did not know him well. “Honestly, I thought he was very well mannered, always dressed nice, very quiet, very polite. Just very gentlemanly. The night when they arrested him and I saw his picture, it was like I didn’t even recognize him. It was a totally different person than what I had known," Maxwell-Rockwell said. When court proceedings began, Maxwell-Rockwell said through all four trials. “Each one, every day. I’ve been there for all of it," she said. On Thursday, she told Local 4 News she still is in shock, and having a hard time wrapping her head around the idea that it’s over. As she reflects, she well remembers a victim statement she read about Liggins during the proceedings. “He was a thief, because he stole her from us. He stole birthdays, he stole a possible wedding, more children … he stole her innocence, he stole our peace of mind,” she said. “I told him that God knew he was guilty, he knew he was guilty, I knew he was guilty and even his lawyers knew he was guilty.” “Out of everything I said, the only thing that upset him was that I said anything about his lawyers. He started yelling at me about leaving his lawyers alone.” The last words she spoke to him were “May God have mercy on your soul.” She still talks to Jennifer sometimes. “I will never stop fighting for her, as hard as the journey has been. I will do anything I can to keep her memory alive.” “I really, really want to thank Bill Davis, Julie Walton and Mike Walton (with the Scott County State's Attorney's office.) Without those three, none of this would have happened.” “Mostly, I thank God. My beliefs are if justice somehow fell through on earth there was still a bigger system.” Liggins affected so many lives, Maxwell-Rockwell said. “The saddest part is how many lives he really took that day besides Jennifer’s. Detectives, and reporters, and firemen, and witnesses that saw things they should never have to see, and they have to live with them.” Jennifer is a hero, Maxwell-Rockwell said. “I’m just so grateful for 32 years ... he cannot hurt another child. She’s a hero. She saved countless children from being hurt. She will always be one of my heroes.” To read the court brief, which contains graphic details of the crime and may not be suitable for all readers, and see video of the proceedings, visit here.

WQAD.com Scott County Attorney's Office: Davenport police officer justified in shooting of man at Casey's on June 8 WQAD.com

Scott County Attorney's Office: Davenport police officer justified in shooting of man at Casey's on June 8

The office released body camera footage that shows how the encounter escalated with Jason Morales drawing and firing a gun at Officer Michael Catton.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Man puts a knife to his throat when Kewanee Police attempt to arrest him

VIOLENT CONTENT WARNING: A man threatens his own life with a knife to his throat after Kewanee Police move in to make his arrest on an outstanding warrant.

WQAD.com Iowa Supreme Court upholds Stanley Liggins' 2019 murder conviction WQAD.com

Iowa Supreme Court upholds Stanley Liggins' 2019 murder conviction

Liggins appealed his 2019 conviction for the murder of Jennifer Lewis, but the Iowa Supreme Court said his claims of prejudice were "insufficient."

WQAD.com Man puts a knife to his throat when Kewanee Police attempt to arrest him WQAD.com

Man puts a knife to his throat when Kewanee Police attempt to arrest him

VIOLENT CONTENT WARNING: A man threatens his own life with a knife to his throat after Kewanee Police move in to make his arrest on an outstanding warrant.

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Annual Red, White, & Boom celebration explodes on Sunday

The annual bi-state Independence Day celebration in Davenport and Rock Island will be July 3. Fireworks start at 9:30 p.m. with a full slate of associated events going on all day on both sides of the river.

Quad-City Times Fans are ecstatic about the return of JDC Quad-City Times

Fans are ecstatic about the return of JDC

JDC spectators expressed excitement regarding the complete return of JDC.

OurQuadCities.com New joint venture for plastic-free QC waterways OurQuadCities.com

New joint venture for plastic-free QC waterways

A new joint venture between Waste Commission of Scott County, MetroLINK, and River Action is working to remove plastic from the Mississippi River. July 1 kicks off the global Plastic Free July, and the participants showcased new methods for picking up plastic from area waterways. For more information, click here.

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More than 2,000 books collected during ‘Cops N’ Kids’ Community Book Drive at TV6

The organizers are hopeful the event will continue to grow in the years ahead.

OurQuadCities.com Local JA President/CEO nominated for  Karl Flemke Pioneer Achievement Award OurQuadCities.com

Local JA President/CEO nominated for Karl Flemke Pioneer Achievement Award

Jack Kosakowski, President and CEO of Junior Achievement USA® announced this week that Dougal Nelson, President and CEO of Junior Achievement of the Heartland, Inc. has been nominated for the 2022 Karl Flemke Pioneer Achievement Award. Junior Achievement of the Heartland has been serving young people in the Quad Cities and surrounding areas for 66 years, giving them the skills and mindset to create sustainable businesses, find meaningful employment, and build booming communities. The Karl Flemke Pioneer Achievement Award is named in honor of Karl Flemke, JA’s National President and CEO from 1982-1994. Flemke took immense pride in the accomplishments of Junior Achievement’s young professionals. He was instrumental in expanding the group’s programs into elementary schools. This award recognizes considerable achievements and contributions of a first-time Junior Achievement USA Area President with not less than two and not more than six years of service in their current position. The Karl Flemke Pioneer Achievement Award was developed and is presented by the JA Pioneers (JASAN). “Dougal has provided great leadership and built a culture of trust within the organization. This nomination is a testament of Dougal’s ability to proactively embrace areas of opportunity and growth within the communities we serve and exemplifies his passion for helping young people succeed. He is a selfless leader with amazing vision for our future.” Nick Kremer, Junior Achievement of the Heartland Governing Board Chair. Nelson is one of five finalists in the nation. His fellow nominees include: Lori McCleese - Junior Achievement of North Central Ohio, Inc. (Akron/Canton) Ryan Osborn - Junior Achievement of Central Iowa, Inc. (Des Moines) Leigh Mansberg - Junior Achievement of Memphis and the Mid-South, Inc. (Memphis, TN) Janie Cook - Junior Achievement of South Texas, Inc. (San Antonio, TX) An awards committee will meet to determine the recipient of this year's award. The winner will be announced and recognized in Fort Worth, TX at the National Leadership Conference on July 14.

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Prosecutors: Fatal shooting of man by Davenport officer was ‘reasonable,’ ‘justified’

The fatal shooting of 45-year-old Jason James Morales by a Davenport officer in June has been deemed justified by the Scott County Attorney’s Office.

WQAD.com Man puts a knife to his throat when Kewanee Police attempt to arrest him WQAD.com

Man puts a knife to his throat when Kewanee Police attempt to arrest him

VIOLENT CONTENT WARNING: A man threatens his own life with a knife to his throat after Kewanee Police move in to make his arrest on an outstanding warrant.

OurQuadCities.com Travel on a Tankful: Baraboo, WI - Circus lives here OurQuadCities.com

Travel on a Tankful: Baraboo, WI - Circus lives here

In our Travel on a Tankful series, OurQuadCities.com will be sharing interesting places to travel to for a tankful of gas or less! Ladies and gentlemen... Children of all ages... Step right up for Baraboo, Wisconsin! Situated along the Baraboo River, Baraboo is the largest city in Sauk County, Wisconsin. With a 2020 population around 12,500, Baraboo is known primarily for its colorful circus history. In 1884, the Ringling Brothers Circus was established in Baraboo, as it was the home of the famed Ringling family. Eventually, several other circuses came to Baraboo, earning the town the nickname "Circus City." Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly) Embracing such a rich history, Baraboo is home to Circus World Museum. The museum features circus artifacts and exhibits and hosts daily live circus performances during the summer months. Owned by the Wisconsin Historical Society, the museum sits on some of the land once owned by the Ringlings themselves. Boasting an antique carousel, elephants and other assorted animal performers, acrobats, jugglers and clowns, the museum features a circus performance under the big top, along with multiple live shows on the grounds. Fair food, a playground, antique circus wagons, displays and a tranquil setting make for a wonderful day of family fun. Circus World Museum is located at 550 Water Street, Baraboo. For more information, click here. 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Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)Circus World Museum - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly) (theclownmuseum.com) Nestled in the quaint downtown area of Baraboo is the International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center (IICHOF). Dedicated to the preservation and advancement of clowning as an artform, Greg DeSanto, graduate of the prestigious Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Clown College, former touring clown for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus and veteran performer for circuses and shows worldwide, is at the helm, serving as Executive Director of the International Clown Hall of Fame and Research Center. Wall-to-wall history, dedications, props, costumes and videos are a feast for the eyes and soul as clowns of all backgrounds are honored. Make sure to ask lots of questions, as any of the guides are more than happy to share their love of clowning as an artform. Staff may occasionally lecture and attend festivals on behalf of the ICHOF, so it's always a good idea to call ahead to ensure they will be open for your visit. The International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center is located at 102 4th Avenue, Baraboo. For more information, click here. International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly)International Clown Hall of Fame & Research Center - Baraboo, WI (photo: Brian Weckerly) Check out Baraboo for around a tankful of gas, and may all your days be circus days!

OurQuadCities.com QC boys soccer team will compete in USA Cup in Minneapolis OurQuadCities.com

QC boys soccer team will compete in USA Cup in Minneapolis

The Quad Cities will have a team of hard-working young men representing the state of Iowa in an upcoming international soccer tournament. The Quad City Strikers Soccer Club’s U14 boys team won the state of Iowa’s Presidents Cup tournament and will represent the state playing against other top-ranked international teams from around the world at the Target USA Cup in Minneapolis July 11-17, according to a team news release. The QC Strikers Soccer Club’s U14 boys team won the state of Iowa’s Presidents Cup tournament. The annual competition (the largest youth soccer tournament in North America) draws more than 1,200 clubs from around the world and is only open to eligible top-ranked clubs. The Strikers are the top-ranked soccer team in their division in Iowa. The team sets a positive example in their schools and community, practices daily, and is dedicated to teamwork, good sportsmanship, and unselfish play, the release said. The team consists of Aiden Nuci, Caleb Hythecker, Colton Schuette, Connor Wehr, Drew Craig, Easton Bohnstengel, Fred Callender, Jackson Leary, Javier Alvarado, Joseph Ly, Lance Brock, Nathan Winger, Payton Douglas, Seth Utsinger and Wyatt Marshall. Due to the high costs of the tournament, Quad City Strikers has set up a GoFundMe page for the team and appreciates any and all donations that can be offered. The GoFundMe is HERE. “We are extremely proud of all of our teams at Quad City Strikers, and are very proud of these boys who have worked hard to rise to this level of competition and compete at an international level,” Morgan Pullias, club president for the team, said in the release. “The Quad Cities is an excellent soccer market that features a lot of talented players and we’re proud to be representing the Quad Cities, and the state of Iowa, in this prestigious tournament. “This is just the beginning of a lot of positive developments for the club, as we’re always looking to provide the best experience for all our players and parents,” Pullias said. “Strikers offers awesome coaching and a great soccer experience with the lowest and most affordable fees, which is important during these tough financial times.” Interested in learning more? Check out the club at qcstrikers.org.

OurQuadCities.com Big name musicals on tap for Music Guild 2023 season OurQuadCities.com

Big name musicals on tap for Music Guild 2023 season

Quad City Music Guild hasn't even opened its July show, but it's already eyeing a big season for 2023, with powerhouse titles on tap for Prospect Park in Moline. The community theater announced its next season slate Thursday on Facebook -- its 75th season of Broadway in the park. It will consist of the following: "Rent" -- March 2023"Singin' in the Rain" -- June 2023"The Wizard of Oz" -- July 2023"Pippin" -- August 2023"Sweeney Todd" -- November 2023 The remainder of the 2022 season is comprised of "Cinderella," "Jekyll & Hyde" and "Elf." For more information, visit the Music Guild website.

WQAD.com Iowa Supreme Court upholds Stanley Liggins' 2019 murder conviction WQAD.com

Iowa Supreme Court upholds Stanley Liggins' 2019 murder conviction

Liggins appealed his 2019 conviction for the murder of Jennifer Lewis, but the Iowa Supreme Court said his claims of prejudice were "insufficient."

OurQuadCities.com Early JDC leaders react after their morning rounds OurQuadCities.com

Early JDC leaders react after their morning rounds

Golfers are still on the course finishing the afternoon round, but here is what some of the morning leaders at the John Deere Classic in Silvis had to say. J.T. Poston led at 9-under, with Vaughn Taylor at -6 and Ricky Barnes another shot behind. window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7801814","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p1","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","version":"5.2.0","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7801814%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3D1%26pagetype%3Dsubindex%26hlmeta%3Dlocal%20news"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3ODAxODE0IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NTY2MjUyMTV9.IbYqy7K-0GZIlUiEKn3jcJHHpLyM2RO2BBb8zYGaqZI","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7801814?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6SC5cJsGaUS5PiZeYV2iX7loGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60,"isPermutiveEnabled":true}); window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7801827","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p2","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","version":"5.2.0","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7801827%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3D1%26pagetype%3Dsubindex%26hlmeta%3Dlocal%20news"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3ODAxODI3IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NTY2MjUyMTV9.bUuqrsrLL3yO_9WFIIfX0nwBbBJNaYePbcmGOXwbsJg","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7801827?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6SC5cJsFakS5PiZeYVqiXrloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60,"isPermutiveEnabled":true});

OurQuadCities.com Bettendorf native becomes new artistic director of Junior Theatre OurQuadCities.com

Bettendorf native becomes new artistic director of Junior Theatre

There could not be a more perfect union than Davenport Junior Theatre and Ashley Becher. The bubbly, super-talented Bettendorf native was recently named DJT's new artistic director. She will lead the Mainstage Acting Company at DJT (heading into its 71st season), typically consisting of three fully realized theatrical productions. Ashley Becher is a 2003 graduate of Bettendorf High School. The artistic director creates the culture of the mainstage, builds relationships with students/families, and hires the professional teams of directors and designers for the season. Becher, 37, is a professional actor, director, choreographer, and creator who truly loves the transformative magic of theatre and the way it can bring us together, according to DJT. She spent more than a decade as an New York City-based actor, in professional theatres around the country, and three years in South Korea (where she met her husband, Bobby). The Bechers – who play Babette and Lumiere in Circa ‘21’s current “Beauty and the Beast” --  also are creators and owners of the production company WhatFun! Theatre, founded in 2014 to produce theater for youth that's smart, approachable, artistic and fun. Ashley and Bobby met in 2012 while touring South Korea, performing and leading workshops for youth and families. Ashley and Bobby Becher have been very active with Circa '21 over the past three years. “She actually brings a lot of experience to the table as a professional actress,” Daniel Sheridan, performing arts supervisor for the city of Davenport (and past DJT artistic director) said this week. “She’s also a solid choreographer and she's a director. With her partner Bobby, they have created a lot of work and original music together, creating kids shows.” “She certainly has a background in that and then she also spent three years in Korea, working at a theater there. That's a very different experience than some of the staff that's around right now, and so it's nice to have the diversity of experience coming in," he said. Due to the part-time nature of artistic director, Becher will have a lot of flexibility in her hours, Sheridan said. He stepped down from that position after 11 years, in May 2020, keeping the performing arts supervisor job. Ben Gougeon led the virtual COVID season of 2020-21, and chose the productions for 2021-22, the 70th anniversary season that just ended last weekend with a big celebration. "Imagine That" was the last production for DJT's 70th season, running last weekend. “When Ben left the position, as artistic director, it ended up being filled by what we what we call the leadership team," Sheridan said. "So we had a production manager, a stage manager and then we had an administrative manager and then myself who does development, fundraising.” Under Gougeon, the position was larger than the salary he deserved (it’s $10,000-$12,000 a year), so it’s being reorganized under Becher, with not as many responsibilities. One she won’t have is running the Junior Board, made up of DJT students that plan special events. Gougeon left early this year to become Quad City Arts’ first events coordinator, and he continues to be a DJT instructor. Free shows for public DJT serves students age 3-18, with an average of 1,850 enrollments per year in programs with students from over 30 different towns. In the last decade, the facility (based at 2822 Eastern Ave.) has expanded into five additional cottages onsite and added a scene shop and scenic storage also on campus. Daniel Sheridan in the Mary Fluhrer Nighswander Theater at Davenport Junior Theatre. DJT switched to offering its mainstage productions free to the public, which presented a financial challenge to the organization, making up about an $8,000 revenue loss. "We were lucky, we were able to do it, so had a break-even year,” Sheridan said. “I'm excited, selfishly working on development, on alumni relationships, and initiatives of the board sets for assistance, finding financial support. I'm excited to have Ashley coming in as artistic director.” “I love their mission, about making theater accessible for all," Becher said Thursday. "I think that's so important and I also really value theater for young audiences. I think it's so important to expose kids to theater -- to develop those relational skills and empathy. And all the creative muscles that they get to flex, just learning how to speak in public and you see people from different sides and see things from a different angle than you normally would.” "A welcoming space" “I love what a welcoming space Junior Theatre is -- they really try to make it inviting for everyone and I just really enjoy that aspect of the culture,” she said. While Becher prizes performing, she gets great satisfaction as a director. Luna Krauss played Rapunzel in DJT's "Imagine That." “I love the collaborative process and so you get to work on it from the beginning and imagine what the world would be like,” she said. “You also get to collaborate with the actors and the designers, the technician to elaborate on that and bring it to life. I just really get a lot of energy out of imagining what a show could be and then growing those ideas and being challenged by them within the process.” Becher wants to continue to make DJT shows free. “Hopefully, the more people that learn about that mission that are able to give a little bit extra, or even just a few dollars when they come to see a show,” she said. “That will help make it accessible for those people who aren't able to pay that money to see a show.” Becher has many directing and choreographing credits at Circa, including "Seussical," "Just Desserts," "Grace for President," "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs," "The Rocky Horror Show," and "Rapunzel in the Wild West." Last summer, Ashley Becher directed and choreographed the 33-member Countryside cast of "Newsies." Earlier this year, she guest directed "Frozen Jr." for North Scott High School and choreographed "Annie" for Moline High School, and just directed "Imagine That" last weekend for Davenport Junior Theatre. Previous QC area productions include director/choreographer for last summer's “Newsies!” at Countryside Community Theatre, and director for DJT's February 2019 production of “Aesop’s Falables.” Becher first moved back to the QC in May 2018 to teach at DJT. What's up next? The shows for next season will be approved in mid-July, then professional staff will be hired. The first production will be presented in October.  DJT is in the process of hiring a new production manager, Sheridan said. The DJT cast of "Imagine That," directed by Becher. “The artistic director is really the eyes, looking up, communicating and staying connected with their families and the public and then the production manager is looking down, doing the nuts and bolts making sure we don't trip and fall over ourselves.”    The new DJT museum (which Sheridan worked over six years, with many AmeriCorps interns in creating) is in Cottage 13, four down from the Nighswander Theatre. For other theaters, Ashley and Bobby Becher will be in Circa’s next show, “Disaster,” and she’ll choreograph “Pippin” for Double Threat Studios, and “Rocky Horror” for The Speakeasy in the fall. Part of the new DJT museum in Cottage 13 at Davenport's Annie Wittenmyer Complex. “I did tell my husband now that he's not allowed to let me say yes to anything else for the fall,” Becher said. "It's hard when there's so many exciting projects that I genuinely want to work on.” For more information on DJT programs, click HERE.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Budgeting for vacation is a smart move

Budgeting for your summer vacation is a smart money move. Consumables like food and snacks can add up more quickly than you think.

OurQuadCities.com New IA laws take effect July 1 OurQuadCities.com

New IA laws take effect July 1

Over 125 new laws are set to take effect in Iowa beginning July 1, the start of the new fiscal year in the state. These new laws affect juvenile justice, renewable energy, travel insurance and bronchodilators in schools, among other issues. The state legislature passed 150 new laws during their most recent session. Some of the laws are more administrative in nature, such as HF2217, which relates to financial reporting by insurance holding company systems, and HF2330, which allows for electronic delivery of some insurance notices and documents. Other new laws refer to hunting, such as SF2334, which outlines the shotguns that may be used to hunt turkeys, and HF2209, which covers minors under the age of 16 accompanying adults who are hunting or trapping. Other new laws affect employment and insurance. HF2355 declares that the maximum total amount of benefits payable to an eligible individual during a benefit year shall not exceed the total of the wage credits in the individual's account during that person's base period, or sixteen times the person's weekly benefit amount, whichever is less. HF2300 states that any member of the National Guard or Reserves who is a full time student under age 25 and called to active duty shall be considered to be continuously insured under a group policy for the purpose of returning to insured dependent status as a full time student under the age of 25. To read more about the new laws in Iowa, click here.

KIIK 104.9 KIIK 104.9

Full Schedule For Clinton’s 4th Of July Festival

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KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Headaches: When you should see a doctor

Headache is one of the top 10 reasons people go to the hospital emergency department

Quad-City Times At Feenstra family fundraising picnic: Gov. Kim Reynolds and former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley praise the Hull representative, condemn Biden and Democrats Quad-City Times

At Feenstra family fundraising picnic: Gov. Kim Reynolds and former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley praise the Hull representative, condemn Biden and Democrats

No matter the speaker at Republican Rep. Randy Feenstra's second-annual family picnic, which featured Gov. Kim Reynolds, former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a common refrain could be heard and a common opponent was repeatedly named.

Quad-City Times Bayside Bistro closes Davenport East Village location Quad-City Times

Bayside Bistro closes Davenport East Village location

A co-owner said they're looking for a new building to open in the Iowa Quad-Cities.

WQAD.com Lucky for Life: Davenport man takes home $25K-a-year prize WQAD.com

Lucky for Life: Davenport man takes home $25K-a-year prize

Doug Schlickman bought his winning Lucky for Life ticket at the Kwik Star on East Kimberly Road.

OurQuadCities.com IL flags lowered in honor of WW2 Medal of Honor recipient OurQuadCities.com

IL flags lowered in honor of WW2 Medal of Honor recipient

Governor J.B. Pritzker has ordered that all persons or entities covered by the Illinois Flag Display Act are to fly the flags at half-staff in honor of Hershel W. “Woody” Williams, who died on June 29 in Huntington, WV at the age of 98. Williams was the last surviving World War II Medal of Honor recipient. Those covered by the Act are asked to immediately lower the United States flags and the State flags at all buildings occupied by personnel until sunset on Sunday, July 3. Born in Quiet Dell, WV in 1923, Hershel W. “Woody” Williams enlisted in the Marine Corps during World War II and served in the Battle of Iwo Jima between February 19-March 26, 1945 with the 21st Marines, 3rd Marine Division. During the battle, Williams displayed “valiant devotion to duty” and service above self as he “enabled his company to reach its objective.” Williams’ actions, commitment to his fellow service members and heroism were recognized on October 5, 1945 when he received the Medal of Honor from President Harry Truman at the White House at the age of 22. The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest award for military valor. Besides the Medal of Honor, Williams was honored by having a Navy ship named for him in 2020, the USS Hershel “Woody” Williams, and a Veterans Administration medical center in Huntington was renamed after him in 2018. Williams worked for the VA for 33 years as a counselor after spending 20 years in the Marines. “He was just a remarkable person,” Mercer County (WV) Commissioner Bill Archer told Stars and Stripes. “He really shared freely his experiences in the war and in peace. and he worked with the veterans who were going through that adverse challenge of trying to get back to civilian life. He worked very closely with them, and it’s all been a mission to him to try to help those of us who are civilians to demonstrate our support for those who made the supreme sacrifice, also to remember all those who served no matter what their duty station was or what the requirements of their service was.” More information on lowering the flag is available by clicking here. To learn more about Williams, click here.

OurQuadCities.com QC Cultural Trust partners get most money they ever have this year OurQuadCities.com

QC Cultural Trust partners get most money they ever have this year

The Quad Cities Cultural Trust gave out the most money ever in a single year this spring -- over $1.7 million -- and that means a lot to its permanently funded partners. “Even with a crazy market and inflation, we distributed a historic amount – which is $1,724,298,” QCCT executive director Jen Dobrunz said recently of this spring disbursements. “It’s the highest we’ve ever done.” QCCT executive director Jen Dobrunz (photo by Jonathan Turner) “It’s incredible – you look at Des Moines, Chicago. No one is doing what we’re doing,” she said. “This is a morsel of what they need.” Founded in 2007 and funded by the John Deere Foundation, Hubbell-Waterman Foundation and Bechtel Trusts, the QCCT has provided annual unrestricted funds (about $14 million total over 15 years) to its permanent partners — the Figge Art Museum, Putnam Museum & Science Center, Quad City Arts, Quad City Botanical Center, Quad City Symphony Orchestra, and River Music Experience. The breakdown of funding for this year, compared to 2018 (when Quad City Arts was added as a partner) is this:   20222018Figge Art Museum$334,824$224,220Putnam Museum$319,314$257,380Quad City Arts$291,032$58,652QC Botanical Center$192,501$118,515QC Symphony Orchestra$312.928$128,322River Music Experience$273,698$137,953 The 50-percent jump in support for the Figge is tremendously important for the museum's executive director Michelle Hargrave, especially given the brutal financial toll of the pandemic. “It's huge. It makes a huge impact," she said of QCCT this week. “We're just extraordinarily thankful and grateful for the continued generosity and support of the trust. We're always grateful for it, but we're especially during this challenging time. Figge executive director Michelle Hargrave “The increased amount will help as we continue to build back our revenue loss, due to the pandemic,” she said. “We're also just appreciative during this period to have this support for our mission. People have turned to the arts over the past couple of years to find ways to process a vast range of emotions and we're proud that we were at the forefront of providing access to the arts in our area.” The importance of having unrestricted grant support can’t be overstated, Hargrave said. “Funders often will award grants for specific programs and so to get operational support, general mission support is unusual and we definitely need that,” she said. “We need that to help us keep the lights on, to pay salaries, to do all of the things that are perhaps a little bit less sexy but are essential for us to continue our mission of bringing art and people together. “We wouldn't be able to put on our fabulous exhibitions like John Leslie Breck or Anne Lindberg without having mission support,” Hargrave said. The new QCCT grant will cover nearly 10% of the Figge’s annual operating budget, which is $3.4 million. "We're really grateful that the trust has not only continued their support but has actually been able to increase it,” Hargrave said. “It’s extremely impactful and we're appreciative of that. We've also improved the other funding that we receive from generous institutional funders as well as individual champions of our education in the community.” In the past two-plus years, one of the Figge’s biggest competitors right now is the couch, she said. “People have gotten used to staying home and watching things online.”  “That mentality has changed a little bit, but we've gotten used to not going out as much and so it's going to take time for us to build it back,” Hargrave said of museum patrons. “We’re eager that it will continue to grow and having the support from the trust as well as from our traditional funders, allows us to grow our programs to meet the increased need within our community.” Since the Figge manages the city of Davenport’s art collection, it has a 10-year service agreement (through 2030), where the museum is getting $753,000 a year, the director said. The theme of the Figge's Art at Heart Gala was a picnic in Giverny, France. Hargrave is also pleased from the turnout of last weekend’s “Art at Heart Gala,” a major fundraiser that attracted over 150 people. “It went wonderfully. We’re still figuring out how we did financially but it was just amazing,” she said. “Everyone had a great time. The energy in the room was phenomenal, we got wonderful reports and feedback on the food. The decor was terrific; the gala committee just really transformed our lobby into a garden in Giverny.” That Monet-inspired theme included 75 colorful umbrellas hung from the ceiling in the Grand Lobby. Quad City Arts impact Kevin Maynard, executive director of Quad City Arts, is equally impressed by the growth and support of QCCT. “It's an incredible change. What I always liked about the Cultural Trust dollars is that the Cultural Trust dollars are operating dollars," he said. "So it really allows us some peace of mind and flexibility and allows us to innovate.” Squonk, in downtown Davenport for last August's Alternating Currents, was organized by Quad City Arts (photo by Jonathan Turner). “You could pretty much draw a direct line to us being able to do things like bringing Squonk to Alternating Currents (in 2021) or there's a couple of things that we're working on internally that we're going to be able to roll out later this this year that are also directly related to having that funding from the Cultural Trust,” he said.  “Once we have certain things that are covered, it just allows us to honestly do a lot more,” Maynard said. The funds also have helped QC Arts recover from COVID. “It was a more crucial thing when we were really deep into COVID-19, but now we're doing more and more programming,” he said. “People are able to see those benefits as well, so it honestly does a lot for us.” Quad City Arts executive director Kevin Maynard spoke on a video for the 44th Annual High School Art Invitational. “What it does for us is one, it helps to strengthen our programs,” Maynard said, noting improving the Visiting Artist Series. “It allows us to either bring in more artists or spend a little more on the artists that we're seeing, which as travel costs, and supply costs are going up across the board. “That makes a difference in being able to have that,” he said. “At times when when we don't have access to certain grants, this helps bridge that gap as well.” The funding will help his agency create a QC artist index and do needed diversity and inclusion training. While the QCCT grants are still competitive (each of the six groups don’t get equal amounts), the nonprofits can rest easy in the knowledge they will get substantial funding every year, Maynard said. “That is crucial.” The difference for Quad City Arts is so big between 2018 and 2022 (a nearly five-fold jump) because 2018 was the first year the organization was a QCCT funded partner. The increase also parallels the trust’s growing assets. “I think one of the big things is, Jen and the Cultural Trust have really increased their fundraising efforts,” Maynard said. “They've had a lot of success and drawing in dollars, so that obviously helps grow that pool.” If the trust adds a partner, that won’t hurt the existing six, he noted. Quad City Arts will present the annual Chalk Art Fest July 16-17 at Schwiebert Riverfront Park, Rock Island. “I think that that says a lot about the role of the trust plays and really just sort of the excitement for the future,” Maynard said. “We love our funding from the Cultural Trust, but we would also love to see more organizations be able to experience that as well.” QC Arts also makes a point to point out it’s a QCCT funded partner when it applies for other grants, reflecting credibility and kind of a “Good Housekeeping” seal of approval. “We definitely talk about being a Cultural Trust partner, in really just about most of our funding capacities,” Maynard said. “When we talk to strangers and we talk to donors, for certain sections of the community, that is very important. "For ones who really know about the purpose and the goals of the trust, they know they’re a trusted entity,” he said. “There’s also some people who, they may not understand what the trust is, so it's not as important to them. We talk about it, we advertise it. We are proud members.” For more information on QCCT, click HERE.

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Davenport Schools awarded $3.7 million grant for new Teacher and Paraeducator Registered Apprenticeship Pilot Program

Davenport Schools will collaborate with the Bettendorf, Clinton, Muscatine, North Scott, Pleasant Valley and West Liberty school districts to offer the opportunity to students and staff.

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Davenport Parking Details For Red, White, & Boom! 2022

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OurQuadCities.com IL Secretary of State offices closed on Independence Day OurQuadCities.com

IL Secretary of State offices closed on Independence Day

Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White has announced that all offices and facilities will be closed on Monday, July 4 in observance of Independence Day. Offices and Driver Services facilities operating on a Tuesday through Saturday schedule will be closed on Saturday, July 2 and reopen for business on Tuesday, July 5. Offices and Driver Services facilities operating on a Monday through Friday schedule will be closed on Monday, July 4 and reopen for business on Tuesday, July 5 Residents can visit the Secretary of State’s website by clicking here for online services, including checking eligibility to renew their driver’s license online, applying for a duplicate driver’s license, renewing license plate stickers, or locating the nearest Driver Services facility. Secretary White has extended all driver’s license, ID card and learner’s permit expiration dates to July 31, 2022. The extension does not apply to commercial driver’s licenses (CDL) and CDL learner’s permits. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has extended the federal REAL ID deadline to May 3, 2023.

WQAD.com 3 Things to Know: Local headlines for June 30, 2022 WQAD.com

3 Things to Know: Local headlines for June 30, 2022

Good Morning Quad Cities shares the local headlines you need to know to start your day, Thursday, June 30.

OurQuadCities.com New WQPT documentaries coming in July OurQuadCities.com

New WQPT documentaries coming in July

WQPT (Quad Cities PBS) will air a number of documentaries by area filmmakers during July. “One of the best parts of my job is working with filmmakers and finding documentaries that tell our area’s stories,” Lora Adams, Director of Marketing and Local Content for the station, said in a Thursday release. New to the lineup will be a film by Davenport's Stephen Folker titled “Tragedy on Highway 74,” which tells the story of a Cedar County, Iowa business owner who was deputized to help track down robbers and lost his life. The 31-minute film documents the final moments leading up to the death of vigilante and local grocer, Bob Sproat. Set in rural Iowa, 1930, it features historical re-enactments and archival photos. That documentary is scheduled for July 7 at 8 p.m. and will be followed by two short subject films by WQPT videographer Chris Ryder and producer Lora Adams. One of the shorts tells the story of an elephant named Norma Jean who is buried in Oquawka, Iowa after she was electrocuted in a storm. The second tells the story of Raymond Fairbank, who was an Air Force weatherman on the crew that helped Chuck Yeager break the sound barrier. A scene from "The Fort: 177 Years of Crime and Punishment at the Iowa State Penitentiary." WQPT will also carry a second viewing of “The Fort: 177 Years of Crime and Punishment at the Iowa State Penitentiary” by Dan Manatt on July 7 at 9 p.m. Manett’s documentary “Whiskey Cookers: The Amazing Story of the Bootleggers of Templeton, Iowa” will air July 17 at 11 p.m., and  July 14 at 8 p.m. will be the Mid America Emmy nominated “Stout Hearted: George Stout and the Guardians of Art” created by Ken Kelley and Marie Wilkes.   “WQPT is committed to partnering with filmmakers who want to tell those famous or little known stories about our area's history,” said Adams. “I am always thrilled when we air a film, it has the opportunity to be submitted for Mid-America Emmy consideration. As a result of WQPT airing these films, they have gone on to be nominated and to win Emmys and bringing them to a wider audience. You can’t ask for more than that,” she said. WQPT is a public media service of Western Illinois University.

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Family of Boy Who Died on Adventureland Ride is Suing the Park

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Quad-City Times Fireworks are the latest victim of the supply chain problem Quad-City Times

Fireworks are the latest victim of the supply chain problem

Shipping costs for fireworks has quadrupled in the last two years. But, local retailers said they are doing what they can to keep costs down.

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Ideas For a Planning a Fun Staycation in the Quad Cities

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QC lane reductions continue over holiday

The Illinois Department of Transportation announced today that lanes that have been closed for construction will reopen, where possible, for the Independence Day holiday to minimize travel disruption. Non-emergency closures will be suspended from 3 p.m. Friday, July 1, to 11:59 p.m. Monday, July 4. The following lane closures will remain in place during the holiday weekend. Motorists can expect delays and should allow extra time for trips through these areas. Drivers are urged to pay close attention to changed conditions and signs in the work zones, obey the posted speed limits, refrain from using mobile devices and stay alert for workers and equipment. At all times, please buckle and drive sober. Jo Daviess County Illinois 78 over the Plum River; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals.Eastbound U.S. 20 through Galena; closed, detour posted. Rock Island County Interstate 280 over the Mississippi River; lane reductions continue.I-280 over Shaffer Creek near Coal Valley; lane reductions continue. Whiteside County U.S. 30 west of Rock Falls; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals.U.S. 30 6 miles west of Morrison; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals. Bureau County I-80 over Maple Grove Creek west of Princeton; lane reductions continue.Illinois 92 over the Hennepin Canal; closed.Interstate 180 over the Illinois River; lane reductions continue. Knox County Interstate 74 over Main Street in Galesburg; lane reductions continue. Mercer County Illinois 94 north of Aledo; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals. Warren County U.S. 34 east of Monmouth; lane reductions continue.U.S. 34 south of Monmouth; lane reductions continue.U.S. 67 north of Monmouth; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals.Illinois 94/135 north of Little York; lane reductions continue, with traffic controlled by temporary signals.

OurQuadCities.com Iowa man is Lucky for Life in lottery OurQuadCities.com

Iowa man is Lucky for Life in lottery

A Davenport man is looking forward to having evidence from the Iowa Lottery to prove to his family and friends that he really did win a prize of $25,000 a year for life in the Lucky for Life® game. “I still think there’s a doubt until I come home and I have a check,” Doug Schlickman laughed as he claimed his prize at the lottery headquarters in Clive. Schlickman matched the first five numbers but missed the Lucky Ball in Monday night’s drawing to win Lucky for Life’s second prize of $25,000 a year for life. He bought his winning ticket at Kwik Star, 1225 E. Kimberly Road in Davenport. It is Iowa’s 14th big win in the game since it debuted in January 2016. Schlickman, 51, who works as a production control supervisor at John Deere Cylinder Works in Moline, said he checked his tickets Tuesday morning on the lottery website and first realized that he’d won $4 for matching just the Powerball® in the Monday drawing. Then he checked his Lucky for Life tickets. He said he had three tickets in the game and the numbers on the last one were coming up lucky.  “They were all matching, so of course I had to go back and forth like, ‘Wait a minute -- what?’” he said. “Then I pulled up the lottery app to scan the ticket and was like, ‘Oh, wow!’” Lucky for Life is a $2 game with drawings each night. The game’s top two prize levels are described as “lasting as long as you do,” meaning that the minimum guaranteed payout for those prize levels is 20 years. There is a lump-sum option for players who would prefer to receive one large amount rather than lifetime annuity payments. The winning numbers in Monday’s Lucky for Life drawing were 2-12-16-29-40 and Lucky Ball 13. Kwik Star will receive a $500 bonus from the lottery for selling the winning ticket. Players in Lucky for Life choose five numbers from a pool of 48 for the white balls and one out of 18 numbers for the Lucky Ball. Players can win the game’s top prize of $1,000 a day for life by matching all six numbers selected in one of its drawings. The game’s second prize, for matching the first five numbers but missing the Lucky Ball, is $25,000 a year for life. Other prizes in the game range from $3 up to $5,000. After realizing he’d won, Schlickman sent a text to his wife, Sarah, a nurse practitioner. “I had asked her on text, ‘How does it feel?’ And she works in an OR so she said, ‘I’m really busy, what are you talking about?’” he recalled. “And I said, ‘Well, how does it feel to be debt free?’ She just sent me some question marks. And then I took a picture on the Iowa Lottery app of when I scanned it and I sent it to her.” Schlickman said that he and his wife plan to pay off debt then invest the remainder for their children’s college expenses and their own retirement. “This puts me a couple steps closer to it,” he said. Schlickman’s Lucky for Life prize is his second big lottery win of 2022. Back in January, he won $12,920.90 in the Cherry Twist Progressive InstaPlay game. Schlickman said he enjoys the anticipation of playing the lottery. “It’s just fun -- the excitement of checking the ticket,” he said. He said he’s not done playing yet; his next goal is to win a Powerball or Mega Millions® jackpot.

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Family of 11-year-old who died in Adventureland incident files lawsuit against park

The family of the 11-year-old boy that died after a raft on the Raging River at Adventureland flipped over last year has filed a lawsuit against the park.

OurQuadCities.com Illinois Family Relief Plan begins July 1 OurQuadCities.com

Illinois Family Relief Plan begins July 1

Beginning July 1, the Illinois Family Relief Plan will take effect, giving consumers relief on grocery, gas and property taxes. The plan adds up to an estimated $1.83 billion in relief, including income and property tax rebates and a temporary cut in several sales taxes, including a year long suspension of grocery taxes. “Starting tomorrow, every Illinoisan will get tax relief on essentials: groceries, gas, your home, and back-to-school supplies, with even more tax relief going into effect next year,” said Governor JB Pritzker. “We are sending $1.8 billion in tax relief to Illinois families – and we are doing that because Democrats balanced the budget, eliminated the bill backlog, and state government is now running a surplus. In challenging times like these, it’s more important than ever to have a government whose first focus is on working families and those who are struggling, and leadership that provides new and creative ways to deliver relief when you need it most.” “Amid historic rates of inflation, the people of our state deserve to know that they are not on their own. We are with them,” said Lt. Governor Juliana Stratton. “This $1.8 billion in tax relief ensures that Illinoisans in every community, rural and urban, are seen and supported. When our residents are feeling the weight of buying food, gas, and making ends meet, Illinois acts to ease the burden.” The Family Relief Plan includes several tax holidays, meaning a temporary cut in taxes, including: Groceries: The state’s 1% sales tax on groceries will be suspended July 1 through June 30, 2023, saving consumers $400 million.Gas: The state’s normally scheduled increase in the motor fuel tax will be delayed from July 1 to January 2023, saving consumers $70 million.School supplies: Sales taxes for qualified clothing and school-related items will be reduced from 6.25% to 1.25% for a 10-day window from August 5 to 14, saving consumers $50 million. Items include qualifying clothing and footwear with a retail selling price of less than $125 per item. Eligible school supplies are not subject to the $125 threshold.  The plan permanently expands the state’s earned income credit from 18% to 20% of the federal credit while expanding the number of households covered, giving an additional $100 million per year back to working families. The State of Illinois is also providing property tax rebates for eligible homeowners in an amount equal to the property tax credit they qualified for on their 2021 Illinois tax returns, up to a maximum of $300. The rebate is not allowed if a taxpayer’s adjusted gross income for the taxable year exceeds $500,000 for returns with a federal filing status if married filing jointly, or $250,000 for all other returns. Individuals who made less than $200,000 in 2021 will receive $50 income tax rebates and couples filing jointly with incomes under $400,000 will receive $100. Tax filers will receive $100 per dependent they claimed on their 2021 taxes, up to three dependents. Income and property tax rebates will be automatically issued to all the estimated 6.2 million taxpayers who qualify under the Family Relief Plan, based on information included in their submitted 2021 tax returns. Comptroller Susanna Mendoza will issue the rebates and expects to begin sending out checks the week of September 12. Distribution will take roughly eight weeks after the rollout begins. Taxpayers who did not file their 2021 IL-1040 individual income tax returns but want to claim the individual income tax rebate, both the property tax and individual income tax rebates, or solely claim the property tax rebate can do so. The Department of Revenue (IDOR) will provide an online submission form on their website. Rebates will be sent automatically using the same method original refunds were transmitted if they were sent directly to the taxpayer by the State of Illinois. If direct deposit was used, the rebate will be deposited directly into a taxpayer’s account. If there was no refund or a paper refund was issued, the rebate will be mailed to the address on file. Taxpayers who did not receive a refund directly from the State of Illinois, such as those who received an advance of their refund from their tax preparer, will receive a paper rebate check mailed to the address on file. “Responsible budgeting – putting $1 billion toward the Rainy Day Fund; $500 million in additional pension payments – allows us to offer taxpayers relief when inflation threatens working families’ buying power,” Comptroller Susana Mendoza said. “The bond rating agencies have praised the approach Illinois is taking now by budgeting responsibly, which is why they have given us six upgrades in the past year, compared to eight downgrades under the previous administration.” “We balanced the budget, raised our credit rating, increased funding for local schools, seniors, higher ed and healthcare, plus we’re sending $1.8 billion in tax relief directly to Illinois families,” said Majority Leader Greg Harris, (D-Chicago). “I’m proud we’re both socially responsible and fiscally responsible. There’s more work to do but Illinois is back, and we’re moving forward.” “The Illinois Family Relief Plan helps to ease inflationary pressures felt by families across this state at a time they need it most,” said House Speaker Emanuel “Chris” Welch. “Because of consistent responsible budgeting by Democrats, we’re able to cut taxes on everyday necessities like groceries and freeze taxes on gas, while also providing much-needed property tax rebates. We know people are struggling and I’m grateful we’re able to put money back into the pockets of hardworking Illinoisans.” “The Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) will certify the list of eligible taxpayers and the rebates will be issued by the Comptroller’s Office,” said IDOR Director David Harris. “Though the 2021 tax deadline was April 18, all income taxpayers who file before Oct. 17 will be eligible for rebate checks.” For additional information or to claim any of the available tax rebates, visit IDOR’s website by clicking here. Taxpayer representatives can be reached by calling 1- 800-732-8866 or 217-782-3336. To read more about the Family Relief Plan, click here.

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Ketanji Brown Jackson to be sworn into the Supreme Court

Jackson’s midday swearing-in ceremony coincides with the start of retirement for outgoing Justice Stephen Breyer.

OurQuadCities.com National foundation pays full mortgage of fallen Sterling firefighter OurQuadCities.com

National foundation pays full mortgage of fallen Sterling firefighter

In honor of Independence Day, the Tunnel to Towers Foundation announced Thursday it has paid, in full, the mortgages held on the home of fallen Sterling Fire Captain Garrett Ramos, Chicago Police Officer Paul Nauden, and Wayne County Deputy Sheriff Sean Ian Riley. Garrett Ramos with his wife and two daughters. On December 4, 2021 Sterling Fire Captain Garrett Ramos was battling a fire from inside a home in rural Rock Falls. The floor collapsed and he fell into the basement, He was brought to the hospital but succumbed to his injuries. He was posthumously promoted to Captain. Ramos grew up in Sterling, and while he didn’t intend to follow in his father’s footsteps and join the fire department, he ended up loving the profession and calling it “the best job in the world,” according to a Tunnel to Towers release. He is survived by his wife, Brittney, and two daughters. “In the midst of the worst reality I could imagine, Tunnel to Towers stepped in and granted me the most unexpected and generous gift—payment of our mortgage. When everything around me was crashing down, they came in and gave me and my girls stability and hope,” Brittney Ramos said in the release.  Garrett Ramos and his family. The Tunnel to Towers Fallen First Responder Home Program pays off the mortgages for the families of law enforcement officers and firefighters who are killed in the line of duty with young children. Ahead of the July 4th holiday, Tunnel to Towers has paid off the mortgages on 22 homes belonging to fallen first responders in 16 states. The Foundation has ensured the families these heroes left behind will be able to stay in the homes they shared with their loved one.  “This Independence Day, as we celebrate our freedom with fireworks and flags, I ask all Americans to take a minute to honor the memories of these fallen first responders who gave their lives to keep our communities safe,” said Tunnel to Towers Chairman and CEO Frank Siller. “Tunnel to Towers will not forget their sacrifice and is honored to ensure that the families they left behind will always have a place to call home free from the burden of a mortgage.” The foundation is dedicated to honoring the sacrifice of FDNY Firefighter Stephen Siller, who laid down his life to save others on Sept. 11, 2001. Stephen Siller was one of the 343 firefighters killed on 9/11. For more than 20 years, the foundation has supported our nation’s first responders, veterans, and their families by providing these heroes and the families they leave behind with mortgage-free homes. For more about the Tunnel to Towers Foundation and its commitment to do good, visit T2T.org. Join us on our mission to provide mortgage-free homes to the heroes and the families they leave behind by donating $11 per month at T2T.org.

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Iowa Supreme Court affirms Stanley Liggins’ conviction in 1990 death of Rock Island girl

The Iowa Supreme Court affirmed Stanley Liggins’ life sentence without parole for the death of 9-year-old Jennifer Lewis in 1990.

OurQuadCities.com Free QC theater is 'unique cultural treasure' OurQuadCities.com

Free QC theater is 'unique cultural treasure'

Local 4 This Morning spoke with Gary Rowe, Director of Administration and Stewardship, Genesius Theatre Foundation. It supports Genesius Guild, which performs free theater Saturdays and Sundays in the summer, in the center of Rock Island's Lincoln Park. Every year, they perform classic Shakespeare dramas and comedies, as well as ancient Greek tragedies performed under mask. "We are one of the only theatre groups performing classical Shakespeare and ancient Greek works in an authentic and outdoor setting," Rowe said, noting over 250,000 people have seen Genesius Guild shows, and over 2,000 people have participated in productions over the group's 66-year history. "We are also a resource for young actors, actresses, and technical crew members from the area to gain invaluable theatre experience," he said. "It is important to continue sharing these classic works with the public through the Guild." Genesius is always looking for volunteers to help off-stage, such as set construction, prop handling, concessions, maintenance, and more. Anyone interested can fill out a form at genesius.org. The performances don't use vocal amplification in order to keep them as authentic as possible to the source material, Rowe said. "Obviously, they didn't have microphones in ancient Greece or Shakespeare's time! Because of this, all of our actors learn to project their voices from the back of their throat and enunciate clearly so the whole audience can hear them." "The classic Greek dramas, which are 2,500 years old, are the foundation of Western theater," he said. "The works of Shakespeare have timeless messages about the great themes of what makes us human, and how we live. To share that with hundreds of people every year, for free, makes the Genesius Guild a unique cultural treasure in our Quad Cities region. To see someone respond to these timeless works is what our mission is all about."

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Red, White and Boom! returns Sunday

The annual bi-state Red, White and Boom in downtown Davenport and Rock Island returns this year on Sunday, July 3, 2022. Family-friendly activities will take place throughout the day in Davenport and Rock Island. At 9:30 p.m. fireworks will be shot, in sync to music broadcast on 97X, from two barges in the middle of the Mississippi River. Spectators can watch from free viewing areas along the Davenport riverfront including LeClaire Park, Quinlan Court, Centennial Park and Bechtel Park, or from Schwiebert Riverfront Park in downtown Rock Island. Bring your own lawn chair. FAMILY ACTIVITES There will be plenty of activities on both sides of the river for families to enjoy ahead of the fireworks display. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Davenport LeClaire Park: Identity Crisis, a 12-piece classic rock band, will take the LeClaire Park bandshell stage for a free performance from 6-9:30 p.m. Davenport Park and Recreation kids zone activities include yard games, bounce houses, a NASCAR simulator, a misting station and more from 6-9 p.m. Magician David Casas will perform live 15-minute shows on the hour from 6-8 p.m. Food trucks will be stationed on Beiderbecke Drive with BBQ, funnel cakes, ice cream, brats, walking tacos and kettle corn and much more. Quinlan Court: Located at the corner of River Drive and Brady Street, the Red, White and Bags! double-elimination tournament will be open to teams of two (age 18+) and take place 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Enjoy a beer from Front Street Brewery, live music and food trucks. Freight House Farmers’ Market: From 10 a.m.-2 p.m., check out favorite local vendors selling freshly grown vegetables to homemade treats. In the parking lot, enjoy Iowa’s History on the Move Mobile Museum from 10 a.m.-9 p.m., a free exhibit focused on Iowa people and places. Modern Woodmen Park: River Bandits vs. the Peoria Chiefs. Game starts at 6 p.m. Rock Island Schwiebert Riverfront Park: DJ Jeff James will provide live music from 5-7 p.m. Class of ‘82, an ‘80s tribute band, begins at 7 p.m. Kids activities will include face-painting and balloon animals, as well as glow merchandise for sale. Bent River Brewing Co. will host a beer garden and a wide variety of food vendors will be on hand. In Davenport, spectators are encouraged to park north of River Drive. Parking will be free in city parking ramps in downtown Davenport from 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Be aware of street closures along the riverfront area. In Rock Island, parking on the street and in the city ramp is free except for reserved spaces in the parking ramp.  For more information, visit the event website.

OurQuadCities.com QC firefighters train for confined-space rescues OurQuadCities.com

QC firefighters train for confined-space rescues

Six members of the Muscatine Fire Department attended a 40-hour confined space rescue class hosted by the Davenport Fire Department and the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF). Muscatine, Davenport, and Rock Island Arsenal firefighters took part in the class. A confined space is defined as a space that has limited or restricted means of entry, is not designed for continuous occupancy, and is large enough and configured so that a person can enter the space and maneuver well enough to perform tasks. Muscatine firefighters in confined-space training (contributed photo.) “Confined space rescue is a service the Muscatine Fire Department performs for our community and local businesses,” said Jerry Ewers, Muscatine fire chief. “Even though confined space emergencies are low occurrences, they are high-risk incidents.” During the five-day, 40-hour course firefighters were introduced to the hazards of confined spaces, mitigating hazards in confined spaces utilizing lock out/tag out (control of hazardous energy sources), air monitoring of confined space atmospheres, and ventilation of confined spaces. Training for a variety of high-risk rescues is a key part of the job for firefighters and firefighter/EMTs including high-angle rescues, ice/water rescues/ trench rescues. Firefighters also train in auto extrication, fire prevention, fire suppression, hazardous materials, and ambulance transport. “We need to be highly trained, equipped and ready for when we are called to any of these emergencies,” Ewers said.   Acting Lieutenant Spencer Ripperger led a team from Muscatine to the confined spaces training, a team that included firefighters Reece Hall, Ben Barrett, Kyle Davis, Colton Pauls, and Michael Fleming. “During the class members performed rescues using rope rescue mechanical advantage systems,” Ripperger said, Muscatine firefighters trained in confined-space rescue. (contributed photo.) Class members wore SCBAs (self-contained breathing apparatus) and SAR units (supplied air respirators) to simulate hazardous air conditions during the exercises. “We were also taught how to make high point anchors using ladders, and different ways of packaging a victim for removal from a confined space utilizing various pieces of rescue equipment,” Ripperger said. The instructors were professional rope rescue and confined space technicians from the IAFF. “We are grateful for the free training offered by the Davenport Fire Department to our six members,” Ewers said. Ripperger noted that every member from Muscatine appreciated the opportunity to take the class. “We all had a great time, got a lot of hands-on experience, and learned a lot of new skills,” Ripperger said. Muscatine firefighters in confined-space rescue training. (contributed photo.)

Quad-City Times 'This is a dream for him:' Deere employee Joel Oltman plays with pros in John May's spot at John Deere Classic Pro-Am Quad-City Times

'This is a dream for him:' Deere employee Joel Oltman plays with pros in John May's spot at John Deere Classic Pro-Am

John Deere Harvester Works Continuous Improvement Coordinator Joel Oltman played in the John Deere Classic Pro-Am Wednesday, taking Deere CEO John May's spot.

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Davenport releases holiday schedule for 4th

The City of Davenport has announced operational and scheduling changes in observance of the Independence Day holiday. ✰ City of Davenport offices and the Public Works Center will be closed Monday, July 4. ✰ The Davenport Police Department front desk and records office will be closed July 4. ✰ Parks and Recreation administrative offices will be closed July 4. ✰ The River's Edge will close at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, July 3 and will be closed on July 4. ✰ The RiverCenter administrative office and the Adler Theatre box office will be closed July 4. ✰ The Davenport Public Library Main, Fairmount and Eastern branches will be closed on July 4. ✰ The Vander Veer Conservatory will be closed July 4. ✰ The Davenport CitiBus transit system services will not be provided July 4. ✰ The Davenport Compost Facility will be closed July 4. ✰ Garbage, recycling, bulky waste and yard waste will be one day late all week. Friday pickup will be on Saturday. Please refer to the solid waste collection calendar for the holiday schedule and more information For more information for the City of Davenport, click here.

WQAD.com Teens from around the country spending week fixing homes in Bureau County WQAD.com

Teens from around the country spending week fixing homes in Bureau County

Close to 200 teenagers from different churches are visiting Bureau County for a "Home Repair Workcamp."

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Deputies find heroin, meth, cocaine after traffic stop

A Dubuque man faces multiple drug-related charges after a traffic stop in Jo Daviess County. Cordero J. Davis, 35, faces felony charges of unlawful possession of methamphetamine, three counts of unlawful delivery of a controlled substance, unlawful delivery of cannabis, unlawful possession of cannabis; and misdemeanor charges of obstructing identification and driving while his license was suspended, according to a news release from the Jo Daviess County Sheriff's Office. Shortly after 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jo Daviess County deputies performed a traffic stop for a lane violation on U. S. Route 20 at South Scout Camp Road, a news release says. Deputies made contact with Davis, and "observed indicators of of criminal activity," the release says. During the investigation, Cordero provided an incorrect name and date of birth. He eventually correctly identified himself, the release says. Deputies learned Cordero has an outstanding warrant for his arrest through Cook County Circuit Court for a narcotics violation, the release says. As the investigation continued, deputies developed probable cause to search the vehicle and found about 928 grams - a little more than 2 pounds - of suspected methamphetamine; 1,567 grams - nearly 3 1/2 pounds - of suspected cannabis; 50 grams of suspected heroin; eight grams of suspected cocaine; and a large amount of cash, the release says. The incident remains under investigation.

Wednesday, June 29th, 2022

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Volunteers help JDC run smoothly

Some John Deere Classic volunteers have served for over 30 years.

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Young golfers enjoy the opportunity to interact with PGA pros at ‘First Tee Youth Day’

After the event, Champ and Bryan gave autographs to the young golfers.

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Summer primary doesn’t change much for Knox County election officials

As election officials across Illinois wind down from yesterday’s primary they’re taking a look at how the shift to a June election changed turnout

OurQuadCities.com MercyOne partners with Iowa State Fair ... and you can win tickets! OurQuadCities.com

MercyOne partners with Iowa State Fair ... and you can win tickets!

MercyOne is a partner in one of Iowa’s longest standing traditions: The Iowa State Fair. Maybe you are singing along with Grandstand entertainment, entering a fun competition, getting a thrillon the Giant Slide, or showing this year’s grand champion - the Iowa State Fair has no end of opportunities to experience your best life, a news release from MercyOne says. As part of its sponsorship, MercyOne will give away several ticket packages to both the public and its colleagues. Prizes include tickets to the fair and a parking pass. Here's how to enter: Share a photo on social media that shows how you Live Your Best Life using #MercyOneLYBL and tag MercyOne. Make sure your privacy post settings are set to public so everyone can see your picture. If you are not a social media user, visit here to upload your photo.Be sure your social media post or website submission includes a short, written story about howyou are living your best life, or how MercyOne has allowed you to keep living your best life.Each submission represents an entry to win tickets to the fair or other prizes.

WQAD.com Teens from around the country spending week fixing homes in Bureau County WQAD.com

Teens from around the country spending week fixing homes in Bureau County

Close to 200 teenagers from different churches are visiting Bureau County for a "Home Repair Workcamp."

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How to remain safe in the heat at the JDC

UnityPoint Health - Trinity will have 18 employees, including nine emergency physicians, and about 25 volunteers onsite at the John Deere Classic.

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Popsicle Pitstops coming to Moline parks in July

Moline is celebrating National Parks and Recreation month during July by giving away free popsicles on Thursdays.

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6-year-old injured in hit-and-run crash

A weekend hit-and-run crash left a 6-year-old boy with a fractured leg and a concussion. The incident occurred on 20th Avenue in Rock Island shortly after 5:30 p.m. Sunday. The boy's mother, Danielle Keel, and her two children were leaving the house to go on a bike ride to a church parking lot down the road. Just as Keel was grabbing her glasses out of the car, her two children began pedaling down the alley. Within seconds, a car hit her son, Jonas. His sister let out a loud scream that sent Keel running to check on them. Keel found Jonas lying in the grass unconscious. "By the time I got there, there was no car, there were no skid-marks, there was no evidence of a car crash," Keel told Local 4 News. Neighbors called for an ambulance and Jonas was taken to Trinity Rock Island Campus - UnityPoint Health, which transferred him to Peoria for more treatment. Jonas was released from the hospital Tuesday, June 28. According to Keel, Jonas has a concussion and a fractured leg, which leaves Jonas immobile for the next couple of months. Doctors will decide next week if he'll need rods to stabilize the break, Keel said. The family has also set up a Gofundme page to help with gas, groceries, and medical expenses. Rock Island Police say security camera caught a dark-colored sedan, possibly a Chevy Malibu, in the neighborhood that may be involved. Rock Island Police ask anyone with information to contact them at 309-732-2677.

WQAD.com Eric Sorensen to face Esther Joy King King in 17th dist. U.S. House race WQAD.com

Eric Sorensen to face Esther Joy King King in 17th dist. U.S. House race

Esther Joy King is a lawyer and in the military. Eric Sorensen is a former TV meteorologist.

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Get the 9×13 Out: Iowa State Fair to Include Casserole Competition

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River Bend Food Bank adds distribution center in Galesburg

The non-profit paired with Galesburg Community Foundation and Fish Food Bank on the project.

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Luxury dog hotel and day care coming to the Quad Cities

K9 Resorts opens in Davenport on July 9.

OurQuadCities.com Police: Suspect chased victim with box cutter, slashed tires at fireworks stand OurQuadCities.com

Police: Suspect chased victim with box cutter, slashed tires at fireworks stand

A Davenport man faces an aggravated misdemeanor charge after police say he charged at a victim with a box cutter, then cut the victim’s tires. Eric Moseley, 40, faces an aggravated misdemeanor charge of assault while displaying a dangerous weapon, court records say. About 10:55 p.m. Sunday, Davenport Police responded to 2902 E. Kimberly Road for a disturbance, an arrest affidavit says. Moseley assaulted the victim by using or displaying a dangerous weapon - a box cutter, the affidavit says. . Additionally, Moseley “intentionally damaged, defaced, altered or destroyed tangible property, to-wit: tires, the cost of replacing, restoring and/or repairing of which is $300 or less,” the affidavit says. Moseley discovered the victim in his fireworks tent “attempting to steal fireworks and told the victim to leave,” the affidavit says. “The victim was frozen in place due to being caught in the act in which the defendant charged the victim and produced a box cutter,” the affidavit says. The victim then began to move toward the exit of the tent and was cut by Moseley, the affidavit says. “The victim did not verbally or physically threaten (Moseley) and (Moseley) was not in fear for his life,” the affidavit says. As the victim attempted to retreat to his vehicle, the defendant chased him to his vehicle and slashed the front driver's side tire and rear driver's side tire, deflating the tires. The approximate value of the tires was $300, the affidavit says. Moseley, who has been released on bond, is set for a preliminary hearing at 10 a.m. July 15 in Scott County Court. In Iowa, aggravated misdemeanors are punishable by up to two years in jail and a fine of $625 to $6,250.

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Mother of Rock Island hit-and-run victim seeks community’s help

The child is temporarily wheelchair bound with a fractured leg. Police confirmed the car kept going after crashing into him.

WQAD.com Sorensen to face King in 17th dist. U.S. House race WQAD.com

Sorensen to face King in 17th dist. U.S. House race

Esther Joy King is a lawyer and in the military. Eric Sorensen is a former meteorologist.

WQAD.com River Bend Food Bank adds distribution center in Galesburg WQAD.com

River Bend Food Bank adds distribution center in Galesburg

The non-profit paired with Galesburg Community Foundation and Fish Food Bank on the project.

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Bettendorf’s Newest Tavern Has a Super Fun Cocktail Menu

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WQAD.com Rock Island police looking for suspect in hit-and-run that injured juvenile WQAD.com

Rock Island police looking for suspect in hit-and-run that injured juvenile

A juvenile's leg was broken after reportedly being struck by a car that fled the scene Sunday afternoon.

OurQuadCities.com Project NOW rehabbing affordable homes for veterans OurQuadCities.com

Project NOW rehabbing affordable homes for veterans

Project NOW is rehabilitating single-family homes and duplexes for local veterans to rent at an affordable rate. Affordable housing means not paying more than 30% of your income for housing. A recent housing study, Silos to Solutions, indicates the gap of 6,645 affordable units in the Quad Cities, according to a Wednesday release from Project NOW. Dwight Ford, executive director of the community action agency based in Rock Island, said that housing is the anchor of all opportunities and he's excited to announce this new program. Local dignitaries cut the ribbon on the first home today (June 29) at 620 14th Street in Rock Island. Major Gen. Jeffrey Jurasek, First Army Deputy Commanding General for Support, spoke at Wednesday's ribbon-cutting held by Project NOW in Rock Island. Ford said that veterans who have supported and provided service to others, should also receive service and support when needed. “Our veterans often do not ask for much and choose to live a life of service giving to others," he said. "We are fortunate, as those which live in the Illinois Quad Cities have an opportunity to witness the support and service they give, as we are the home to an Army installation (Rock Island Arsenal). "We are also close enough to witness those who continue to face financial challenges due to high unemployment rates, after their transition from active duty and the economic challenges their families face due to the persistence of the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic impact," Ford said. "This endeavor honors the commitment of veterans while strengthening our community service to one another. "It’s about honor. It’s about a place to call home," he said. Project NOW executive director Dwight Ford (right) with Major Gen. Jeffrey Jurasek, First Army Deputy Commanding General for Support (based at the Arsenal) on June 29, 2022. The first two-bedroom home -- to rent for $490 a month -- is sponsored by donations from Estes Construction, Sisters of St. Benedict, United Way, Modern Woodmen of America and First Baptist Church in Moline. Humble Dwellings is providing all the home’s furnishings. The other homes that will become Honor Homes are: 505 13th Avenue, Rock Island103 N. Elm Street, Kewanee402 7th Street, Moline929 12th Ave., Rock Island518 6th St., Rock Island The next to be completed, by December, will be the Moline home. To apply to rent an Honor Home, visit Project NOW's website.

OurQuadCities.com Tips help first-time pet owners for Fourth of July celebrations OurQuadCities.com

Tips help first-time pet owners for Fourth of July celebrations

We're getting closer to the holiday weekend and people are starting to set off more fireworks. The loud noises from those fireworks can cause some pets to get scared. Dr. Stacia Belda, veterinarian for the Quad City Animal Welfare Center, recommends owners have their pets micro-chipped in their name in case the animals become startled and run off. Another recommendation is for owners to visit their veterinarian now in case their dog needs anxiety medications. She also has tips for first-time pet owners. "You don't know how your animal is going to react," she said. "So I guess I would prepare for the worst just in case. "I wouldn't be taking my dog or cat to a fireworks show if you don't know how they're going to respond, because that may set you up for failure," Belda said. "So make sure they're in a secure room or kennel and then you can watch how they're going to react to the firework show. That may help prepare for future years."

OurQuadCities.com Late-night pizza run results in a stolen and totaled car OurQuadCities.com

Late-night pizza run results in a stolen and totaled car

A 2011 Kia Optima was stolen from the Pizza Hut parking lot on Locust Street in Davenport around 9 p.m. Monday night.   Car owner Whitley Hubanks says she bought it for her daughter for when she was old enough to drive. In the meantime, Hubanks’ family would drive the car. "My child’s father used my daughter’s car to get a pizza, because Pizza Hut is right around the corner from where I live," she recalled. "The car has a keyless start, so he took the keys into Pizza Hut with him, but he left the car running. Within five minutes, some kids were in the car, and they drove off." Hubanks says her daughter posted on social media that her car had been stolen, and shortly after a friend sent over Ring Camera footage of three people in the stolen car, attempting to break into more cars. “They were in my daughter’s car in the video,” said Hubanks Days later, the car was found in somebody's backyard in Rock Island, destroyed. The Davenport Police Department confirmed this was an ongoing investigation. Hubanks has put in a request to have the vehicle processed for evidence and fingerprints.

OurQuadCities.com Rock Island temporarily bans new vape shops OurQuadCities.com

Rock Island temporarily bans new vape shops

No new vape shops in Rock Island for six months - that was the collective agreement from the city council following a slue of new vape businesses opening primarily along 18th Avenue. The temporary ban is to allow the city council time to review and revise tobacco policies to include vape products and areas of commerce. City ordinances regarding tobacco have not been updated since 1996, and new ordinances will properly define what a vape shop is so Rock Island can expand with new businesses.

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Bustos secures multiple priorities in new energy and water package

This would bring significant federal investments to communities in Northwest and Central Illinois

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Inmate charged in fellow inmate’s death at Thomson prison

Arraignment has not yet been scheduled.

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Prison union to host job fair in Bettendorf to fill USP Thomson positions

The direct-hire career fair is expediting the hiring process and offering a 25% recruitment bonus to fill numerous positions at the federal prison in Thomson.

OurQuadCities.com No final results in Democratic 72nd district race expected for two weeks OurQuadCities.com

No final results in Democratic 72nd district race expected for two weeks

A local race for state representative is still undecided in Rock Island County and the final results won’t be in for two weeks. Right now in the Democratic race for state representative for the 72nd district, Gregg Johnson leads Thurgood Brooks by just 28 votes. Jeffrey Deppe is about 500 votes behind both. However, mail-in ballots have not been counted yet and won't be until July 13th. Mail in ballots had to be postmarked by June 28 in order to be counted. In this race, those ballots may make a major difference in the outcome. If the difference in the top two candidates is less than five percent, an automatic recount will be triggered.

Quad-City Times 3,500 petunias and counting: Flora adds flair to John Deere Classic Quad-City Times

3,500 petunias and counting: Flora adds flair to John Deere Classic

Landscaping provides the finishing touch at the John Deere Classic.

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Police investigate after hit-and-run crash injures child in Rock Island Sunday

Rock Island police ask anyone that can identify the vehicle or its drivers to contact them or Quad Cities Crime Stoppers.

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Rock Island police looking for hit-and-run driver

On Sunday, June 26, 2022 at approximately 5:32 p.m., the Rock Island Police Department responded to a hit and run in the 2300 block of 20th Avenue, involving a juvenile who was struck while riding a bicycle. The juvenile was transported by ambulance to the UnityPoint-Trinity Hospital and later transferred to Peoria for treatment of a broken leg, police said in a Wednesday release. The juvenile is in stable condition. Police did not specify the age of the juvenile who was hurt. Residential security cameras in the vicinity recorded a suspect vehicle traveling west on 20th Avenue. The vehicle is a dark in color sedan, possibly a late-model Chevy Malibu, the release said. Pictures and video of this vehicle are available to view on the Rock Island Police Department’s Facebook page HERE. Anyone that can identify this vehicle or its driver is asked to contact the Rock Island Police Department at 309-732-2677 or Crime Stoppers at 309-762-9500 or using the P3 Tips app.

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Deputies: Dubuque man arrested on drug charges following traffic stop in Jo Daviess Co.

According to deputies, the investigation is ongoing.

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Admission to Figge Art Museum is free this July. Here's what's on display

The museum is beginning an art lending partnership with an Omaha museum to bring art about the American West and Indigenous communities for the month of July.

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Whitside Co. will pause COVID-19 testing after June 30th

It will close early at 1:00 p.m. on June 30th and remain paused while Health officials work with the Illinois Department of Public Health.

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Bettendorf fire chief shares firework safety tips ahead of the 4th of July

The Bettendorf fire department wants to remind everyone how dangerous fireworks can be when not used properly.

OurQuadCities.com In Rock Island, 'We Rise Up for Parks and Recreation' OurQuadCities.com

In Rock Island, 'We Rise Up for Parks and Recreation'

The City of Rock Island has proclaimed July as Parks and Recreation Month. A variety of activities are planned for all ages and abilities throughout the month of July to show how the city is stronger, more vibrant and more resilient because of parks and recreation. This year’s theme is “We Rise Up for Parks and Recreation.” Park and Recreation Month is an initiative of the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), and Rock Island invites the community to share their stories about what parks and recreation mean to them. With everything from Red, White and Boom!, Park Party, Yoga in the Park, Concerts in the Park and much more, there are plenty of ways to celebrate Parks and Recreation Month. For a list of all the events happening this month, click here. “This July, we are bringing attention to how important it is to rise up and support our field, because every day, park and recreation professionals rise up for their communities in service of equity, climate-readiness, and overall health and well-being.” - NRPA Since 1985, America has celebrated July as Park and Recreation Month. A program of the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), the goal is to raise awareness of the fundamental impact parks and recreation has on communities nationwide. They encourage everyone to share how parks and recreation have improved their quality of life, as well as why their local park and recreation professionals are important to them, on social media with the hashtag #RiseUpJuly and #riparksandrec or tag them on Facebook @rockislandparksandrec, Instagram @ri_parksandrec or Twitter @RIparksandrec.