QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Tuesday, January 25th, 2022

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Illinois DMV’s are back open, here are some online options to avoid the line

Officials of the Illinois Secretary of State want to remind motorists of online services to avoid braving the cold temperatures this week.

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Police release names of suspect, victims in Galesburg shooting

The shooting happened Saturday.

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Births for Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY MOLINE

Monday, January 24th, 2022

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$1.3 million in rental assistance available in Rock Island County

Born out of a partnership with the 14th Judicial Circuit Court, the Rock Island County Bar Association, Project NOW, Prairie State Legal Services and The Salvation Army, the program has helped tenants behind on rent with $1.2 million since February 2021.

WQAD.com BNSF workers awaiting strike approval from federal judge WQAD.com

BNSF workers awaiting strike approval from federal judge

17,000 BNSF union workers are preparing to strike over new attendance policies. One employee says workers will need to be available 90 percent of the time.

WQAD.com Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling-Rock Falls bridge WQAD.com

Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling-Rock Falls bridge

Around midnight on Sunday, a driver hit and killed a pedestrian and injured an officer on the 1st Avenue Bridge in Sterling.

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Rock Island native Madison Keys advances to Semifinals at Australian Open

Rock Island native Madison Keys advanced to the semifinals at the Australian Open defeating 4th ranked Barbora Krejcikova in straight sets 6-3 and 6-2.

OurQuadCities.com ‘Hamilton’ taking another shot at a tour, when and how to get your tickets OurQuadCities.com

‘Hamilton’ taking another shot at a tour, when and how to get your tickets

DES MOINES, Iowa- World-renowned musical Hamilton will soon tour the U.S., and ticket sales are underway. The closest showing to the Quad Cities? Des Moines, Iowa. Hamilton debuted on Broadway in 2015 and went on to win 11 Tony awards, including Best Musical. The tour of the production will be the second Broadway show of 2022 held at the Civic Center in Des Moines and tickets have already gone on sale online and in-person at the Civic Center ticket office. Hamilton runs from May 17 until June 5. Jeff Chelesvig, president and CEO of Des Moines Performing Arts DMPA staff warns of an increase of second-party vendors selling tickets and recommends only purchasing through them as the safest way.  Tickets for the tour of the Broadway smash-hit will range from $59 to $159, and there will be a select number of premium seats available for $249 for each of the performances. DMPA will continue to update guests on the COVID policies as the show gets closer. The link to all that ticket information can be found here.

OurQuadCities.com More than 70 QC business get COVID-19 relief grants OurQuadCities.com

More than 70 QC business get COVID-19 relief grants

More help is on the way for small businesses in the Quad Cities area that suffered during the pandemic. According to a news release, 71 businesses across 10 Illinois counties near the Quad Cities will get a share of new COVID-19 relief money from the state of Illinois. JB Pritzker, governor of Illinois, announced on Jan. 20 that more than $111 million will go to small businesses across the state. A grand total of $3,365,000 will be divided among the 71 businesses in the Quad Cities area, with each business getting at least $5,000. Here's a breakdown: The 10 Illinois counties in which those 71 businesses are located include Rock Island, Knox, Henry, Warren, Jo Daviess, Whiteside, Bureau, Lee, Mercer and Henderson Counties. Of those 71 businesses, 21 are in Knox County, 20 in Rock Island County, nine in Henry County, five in both Warren and Jo Daviess Counties, four in Whiteside County, three in Bureau County, two in Lee County, and one in both Mercer and Henderson Counties. The towns included are Galesburg, 21 businessesRock Island, 12Kewanee, sixMoline, fourMonmouth, fourGalena, four Rock Falls, fourSilvis, threeGeneseo, twoSpring Valley, twoDixon, two East Moline, oneAnnawan, oneRoseville, oneEast Dubuque, onePrinceton, oneNew Boston, oneOquawka, one. With a different number of businesses receiving grant money in each town and county, some counties got around a million dollars collectively, while others got $30,000 or less. The county with the most money going to businesses was Rock Island County, with $1,250,000 being split between 20 businesses$905,000 went to the 21 businesses in Knox County, all of which are in Galesburg$390,000 will be split among five businesses in Jo Daviess County, four of which are in Galena$330,000 will be split among nine businesses in Henry County$260,000 will be divided among four businesses in Whiteside County, all of which are in Rock Falls$100,000 will be going to the two businesses in Lee County, both of which are in Dixon$75,000 will be split between the five businesses in Warren County, four of which are in Monmouth$30,000 will be split among three businesses in Bureau County$20,000 will go to the one business in Mercer County, which is Rocky's Sturgeon Bay Inn in New BostonLastly, $5,000 will go to the one business in Henderson County, Southeastern Strength & Fitness in OquawkaOf the 71 businesses, the ones that received the most grant money were the Holiday Inn hotels in Rock Island and Moline, each getting $250,000. Many other hotels got big paydays too: $175,000 went to the DeSoto House Hotel in Galena$165,000 went to Best Western Prairie Inn in Galesburg$130,000 went to Country Inn & Suites in Rock Falls, each of which were the businesses receiving the biggest grants in their counties. Other big winners included Breedloves Sporting Goods in Kewanee, receiving $150,000, the most out of all Henry County businesses. A few restaurants got large grants as well, including Palmyra Pub & Eatery in Dixon, receiving $85,000, and Maple City Restaurant in Monmouth, receiving $35,000, the most out of any business in their counties. Another business in Rock Island that received grant money was Quad City Arts in the downtown district, getting $80,000. Kevin Maynard, executive director of Quad City Arts, says the money goes a long way, because they had to completely shut down from March until June of 2020, and had to cancel their biggest fundraiser that year. "It helps to offset the cost that we incurred, or the revenue we didn't bring in during the time that we were shut down and we canceled numerous events, including our Festival of Trees event in 2020," Maynard said. Maynard plans on using a lot of the money this year, and wants to use plenty of it to give back to the community. "Really what people are going to see is more programming in our community that is either sponsored in part by, or in whole, by Quad City Arts," Maynard said. To see the full list of businesses and how much money they received, click here.

OurQuadCities.com Songs that made it from "Books to Broadway" to be featured in QC cabaret on Friday OurQuadCities.com

Songs that made it from "Books to Broadway" to be featured in QC cabaret on Friday

From the Bible to Charles Dickens, to the acclaimed 2004 Ron Chernow biography of a certain Founding Father, books have been a bountiful, seemingly endless source of inspiration for Broadway composers for decades. Brent Tubbs, co-owner of The Spotlight Theatre, 1800 7th Ave., Moline, thought that would be a natural theme for a musical cabaret, so he chose Katie Griswold (a 2020 Augustana alum and local music teacher) to create and oversee "Books to Broadway." The hour-long concert -- on the Spotlight stage, accompanied by Mason Moss -- will be one night only, Friday, Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. "I had been talking to (owners) Brent and Sara about putting together a cabaret show outside of their regular shows," Griswold said Monday. An elementary music teacher at Washington and Jane Addams schools in Moline, she was music director for Spotlight's "Little Shop of Horrors" last fall and assistant music director (as well as a nun) for "Sound of Music" in December. Katie Griswold is a 2020 Augustana College graduate and elementary music teacher in Moline. Griswold quickly assembled a list of about 80 Broadway shows that have been based on books. For this first cabaret, there are 17 songs to be presented from 16 musicals ("Tuck Everlasting" is represented twice). Griswold herself will sing the duet "State Road 21" (with Jacob Johnson) from "The Bridges of Madison County," and "Samson" (with Madeline Rodriguez) from the biblical-themed song cycle, "Her Sound." Some of the better known songs in the cabaret will be "A Cockeyed Optimist" from "South Pacific"; "Turn Back O Man" from "Godspell"; "A Whole New World" from "Aladdin"; "The Wizard and I" from "Wicked"; and "Burn" from "Hamilton." The 17 songs in the show are from these musicals: "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying""Tuck Everlasting""Miss Saigon""Be More Chill""Finding Neverland""Her Sound""Hamilton""South Pacific""Godspell""Wicked""Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812""Aladdin""The Bridges of Madison County""Little Women""Big Fish""The Lightning Thief" Part of the show impetus is to preview Spotlight's next major production, "The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical," which premiered off-Broadway in 2014 and on Broadway in 2019. That has music and lyrics by Rob Rokicki and a book by Joe Tracz, based on the 2005 novel of the same name by Rick Riordan. The musical follows Percy Jackson, a teenager who newly discovers that he is a demigod and goes on an epic quest to find Zeus' missing lightning bolt and prevent a war between the Greek gods. The Percy Jackson musical will play at the Spotlight for two weekends in February. At least half of Friday's cast is from the Spotlight's upcoming production, which is to run Feb. 18 to 27. "I read that book when I was in 5th grade," Griswold said. "It's definitely up there with 'Harry Potter' and 'The Hunger Games'." The singers who are in "The Lightning Thief" cast are Bella Kuta, Isaiah Jensen, Ryan J. Hurdle, Tim Dominicus, Brycen Witt, Bailey Hacker, Katie Griswold, Madeleine Rodriguez, Audrey Seneli, Rebecca Casad, Kirsten Sindelar,  and Joseph Lasher. The staff members singing in the cabaret are Violeta Jensen (assistant stage manager), Noah Hill, (director), and Synth Gonzalez (stage manager). Griswold hopes the "Books to Broadway" cabarets will be an ongoing series through 2022. "There are so many songs we could do," she said. "That's a really cool thing." Spotlight will hold auditions for "Tuck Everlasting" (the June show) on Feb. 11 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Feb. 12 from noon to 2 p.m., and callbacks (if needed) will be Sunday, Feb. 13th at noon. Tickets for the "Books to Broadway" show will be $15 in advance and $17 at the door. For tickets and more information, call 309-912-7647 or visit the Spotlight website.

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Bettendorf woman with Cerebral Palsy standing freely for first time with help from ‘Bungee QC’

She stood freely for the first time in her life Sunday.

WQAD.com Police ID final suspect in armed vape shop robbery WQAD.com

Police ID final suspect in armed vape shop robbery

The armed robbery occurred at about 11 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 18 at Blackhawk Tobacco & Vape in Rock Island.

OurQuadCities.com QC hardware store steps up to support children's hospital OurQuadCities.com

QC hardware store steps up to support children's hospital

A hardware store in Clinton continues to step up to support the University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital. O'Donnell Ace Hardware has been raising money for the past three years. The money goes to the Children's Miracle Network Hospitals and in turn to the University's Children Hospital, said Assistant Manager Shane Pinder. "This is our biggest year yet. We did $16,000, just a little over, which is our Clinton store here. On average we did $26,000-$27,000 out of seven stores," said Pinder. "Every 10 cents of every single key we do in this store gets donated. As well, we'll do simple food events kind of things for snacks, any type of donations." Pinder knows how meaningful these donations are since his daughter was once a patient at the children's hospital. "My daughter needed it right away, quickly, and we didn't see a bill for it. It was just overwhelming at that point," said Pinder. The store started fundraising three years ago and has received great support since day one. "Our first year we barely hit our goal. We've always had a goal of $5,000 to $10,000 when we first started. Now every year is $10,000. Now we need to make a goal so we can strive ourselves at a store level to get going even more," said Pinder.

OurQuadCities.com Monday marks two-year anniversary of first COVID case in Illinois OurQuadCities.com

Monday marks two-year anniversary of first COVID case in Illinois

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) continues to urge people to get vaccinated and boosted as it marks the two-year anniversary of the first COVID-19 case reported in Illinois. Two years later, IDPH is reporting more than 30,000 COVID-19 deaths in Illinois, the agency said Monday. “On January 24, 2020, when we announced the first case of COVID-19 in Illinois, we were not imagining that two years later we would still be battling the virus with this ferocity,” IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said in a Monday release.  “While we have seen the highest number of cases and hospitalizations throughout the entire pandemic this January, we are cautiously optimistic that those numbers will continue to decrease as quickly as they rose due to the Omicron variant.” “We have learned a great deal in the two years since the first case was reported in Illinois and we continue to learn as this virus and its variants are constantly changing," Ezike said. "We now have safe and effective vaccines; we have oral antiviral and monoclonal antibody treatments; and we know that proper masking, testing, and isolation and quarantine can help slow the spread of the virus. “As COVID-19 evolves, so too will our recommendations and guidance. Our goal remains the same – to protect the health and safety of all Illinois residents as we explore how we will coexist with COVID-19.” Illinois milestones: Jan. 24, 2020 – First confirmed Illinois case of COVID-19 reported in a Chicago resident, a woman in her 60s who returned from Wuhan, China on Jan. 13, 2020. Jan. 30, 2020 – second confirmed case of COVID-19 in Illinois reported in a man in his 60s and the spouse of the first confirmed case in Illinois. This was the first person-to-person spread of the virus in the United States.Feb. 11, 2020 – IDPH announces it is able to conduct testing for SARS-CoV-2, making Illinois the first state to be able to perform in-state testing. March 17, 2020 – IDPH announces the first COVID-19 death in Illinois.Dec. 15, 2020 – First COVID-19 vaccines administered in Illinois. Vaccination is the key to ending this pandemic. To find a COVID-19 vaccination location near you, go to www.vaccines.gov.

OurQuadCities.com QC community colleges receive grant for college and career transition OurQuadCities.com

QC community colleges receive grant for college and career transition

The Iowa Department of Education awarded seven $50,000 competitive grants Monday to help establish new college and career transition counselor positions. In the QCA, Eastern Iowa Community Colleges were awarded one start-up grant. Des Moines Area Community College and Indian Hills Community College were also each awarded a start-up grant, and Iowa Central Community College and North Iowa Area Community College were awarded two start-up grants to support new college and career transition counselors who will work with career exploration and the transition to college and career training. These programs align with the state’s Future Ready Iowa goal, which calls for 70% of Iowa’s workforce to have education or training beyond high school by 2025. The grants will support seven new college and career transition counselors who will work with students in 14 school districts across the state: North Scott, Ballard, Belmond-Klemme, Clear Lake, Colo-NESCO, Davis County, Fort Dodge, Lake Mills, Moulton-Udell, Newell-Fonda, Osage, Wayne, West Fork and West Hancock. “Growing the number of college and career transition counselors across the state will help more students explore career opportunities and ensure they have the support they need for continued success beyond high school,” Iowa Department of Education Director Ann Lebo said. “I commend our community colleges and school district partners for their commitment to supporting high school students in their career exploration and ensuring a successful transition to college, postsecondary training and the workforce.” The three-year grants will help establish college and career transition counselors for academic years 2022-23 through 2024-25. To make these shared positions sustainable, ongoing funding will be provided by the colleges and districts. For more information, click here.

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Passenger describes cruise ship reroute after US judge orders seizure

One passenger, who grew up in Bettendorf, and her husband were on board the Crystal Symphony cruise ship celebrating their 36th wedding anniversary.

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Boil order issued for 1st Avenue in Hampton, IL

A boil order is now in effect for an area of Hampton after a water main break on Monday.

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Is there hope in the aftermath of a receding omicron wave? Plus more COVID news

World health officials are offering hope that the ebbing of the omicron wave could give way to a new, more manageable phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.

WQAD.com THIS WEEK: The difficult job to create jobs in Iowa WQAD.com

THIS WEEK: The difficult job to create jobs in Iowa

Gov. Kim Reynolds says er tax cuts and other incentives are designed to spur job growth in the state

WQAD.com '99 US Women's World Cup champs to host soccer camp in Quad Cities WQAD.com

'99 US Women's World Cup champs to host soccer camp in Quad Cities

U.S. National Team legends Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilly and Tisha Venturini are bringing TeamFirst Soccer Academy to the Quad Cities this March.

OurQuadCities.com Vanished QC: A Bettendorf man leaves home one morning ... and disappears OurQuadCities.com

Vanished QC: A Bettendorf man leaves home one morning ... and disappears

There is a hole in their hearts that only their son’s return will repair. David McAllister of Bettendorf is now 27. He went missing in May of 2017, and each year that passes continues to bring anguish to his family. He last was seen at his Bettendorf home. He left in the early hours of May 11, 2017,  and said he would return that evening. He his cell phone, a Bible and a backpack, according to The Charley Project, which profiles cold-case missing-persons cases. His mother remembers going to work early that day, and she noticed David wasn’t home. She texted him, and asked whether he was doing OK. He said he was doing some walking and thinking and spreading the Word.,” Marilyn remembers. She texted him a prayer, and said something she never had said before: “I love you to the moon and back. And I’ll never say it again.” Faith played a major role in David’s life. He and his mother were baptized on the same day when David was younger. They remained close as David grew older, and even when he hitchhiked from Colorado to California, rode trains and lived on the road. “Every day, I’d get a text. Every day I’d hear from him … every day,’ Marilyn says. At first, the parents wondered whether David had taken off again when he disappeared. But as days and weeks went by, his parents grew more worried – it wasn’t like David not to keep in touch. Months later,  officials traced the last ping of David’s phone off the St. Ambrose tower. That indicated he somewhere near Vander Veer or Garfield Park. “My gut tells me somebody killed him, and here in the Quad Cities. I believe it was somebody he trusted,’ his mother said. “I don’t think he saw it coming,” she says. “That’s my gut. I can’t prove it.” “If you know anything, tell,” she asks the public. “I don’t care how small it seems. Somebody knows something. Nobody just walks off the face of the earth. He was 22 years old. He didn’t just disappear.” “There is a hole in our family that you just can’t fix,” said Marilyn, who only wants to know the whereabouts of her middle son.“We need to find him, regardless of what that means,” she said. “I would rather find him deceased, and know that he’s in the arms of Jesus, than to wonder every day where he’s at. Is he cold? Is he hungry? Is he lonely?” His family has said he was dealing with some personal problems when he disappeared, but until then he always kept in touch with them. He did not have a car. “People always use the word ‘closure.’ But it’s really not closure. It’s a different kind of grieving. Right now we’re just grieving that we can’t find him,” she said. David’s dad, Jeff McAllister, remembers he talked with David briefly that morning. He asked David if he was going to be coming home that night. “That’s the plan,” David replied. But sometime in the afternoon David stopped responding to texts and phone calls. “We kept trying,” Jeff said. “We weren’t exactly sure. David had gone traveling on his own. Generally, he told us when he was leaving.” Now he counts the days since he has seen his son. “As of today, it’s been 1,715 days,” he told Local 4 News. “The easiest thing I can relate it to is when a loved one passes,” he said. There’s nothing you can. They’ve done everything possible to find him, he said. “The difference between having a loved one pass and this is when a loved one passes, you know where they’re at.” “You never forget,” Jeff said. “You never stop thinking about it. You have good days and bad days.”Jeff has two other sons to worry and care about. “I love all three of them. You just take it one day at a time. You always hope that you’re going to hear something.” “I want him home,” he said. “I want to hear him laugh … hug him again. Even argue with him.” Jeff begs people to look at pictures of all Quad-Citians who are missing. “There are people out there that do watch, and are looking. You appreciate that greatly. You never know if he is out there somewhere. You could be the one who sees, if not David, maybe one of the others that are missing.” Before David went missing, it was one o those things you think it’s never going to happen to you. But it does. “Every time we hear about remains being found, we start to wonder is this the time that I’m going to get the call, and they’re going to say it’s David?” “You hope it is him, as well as hope it’s not him,” Jeff said. David loved his roofing job. He loved being outdoors, and being busy. “He was an extremely hard worker,” his dad said. Jeff remembers when someone hired David to mow his lawn, and how David went above and beyond what was expected. “When he did something he did it to the best of his ability,” Jeff said. “He was very conscientious about what he was doing.” Meanwhile, David’s family waits. And wonders. “I think there is somebody out there that knows something – somebody that has an idea of what happened to him,” Jeff said. “We’re not looking to punish anybody,” he said, adding that people have many options to remain anonymous.   “There is a piece of me that’s missing,” said Jeff, who says he will never be whole again until his son is back. “There isn’t a day that goes by without thinking about him, wondering if he’s OK, wondering if he needs anything.” David has several tattoos, including “Stay” inside his right elbow, “true” inside his left elbow, and a peace sign on his back/right shoulder blade. David, who has pierced ears, walks with a limp. He also has several scars from BMX riding. Visit the Facebook page, Bring David McAllister Home, here. David's case is featured on The Charley Project site here. David's case also is featured on the Quad Cities Missing Persons Network. If you have information that could lead to David’s whereabouts, please contact Bettendorf Police, 563-344-4015; or Crime Stoppers, 309-792-9500. Anonymous tips can be sent to P. O. Box 1474, Bettendorf, IA 52722.

OurQuadCities.com UnityPoint Health -- Trinity chaplain honored for determination, perseverance in stroke recovery OurQuadCities.com

UnityPoint Health -- Trinity chaplain honored for determination, perseverance in stroke recovery

First came the life-changing stroke, then the equally life-altering stroke of luck -- and persistent, hard work. UnityPoint Health – Trinity Rehabilitation Services is celebrating its latest Rehabilitant of the Year -- Deacon Russ Swim. The award honors patients who have shown incredible progress and recovery after a life-changing medical event. Deacon Swim, a 71-year-old chaplain with UnityPoint Health – Trinity for the past four years, suffered a stroke in August 2021 while providing faith services to patients at Trinity's Rock Island hospital. Nurses and medical teams near him at the time jumped into action and provided immediate life-saving care, according to a Monday release from Trinity. The stroke left Deacon Swim with mobility issues and difficulty with speech. After spending nearly a month in the hospital in Iowa City, Swim began his inpatient rehabilitation with the team at Trinity and has made significant strides on his road to recovery. He also left a lasting impression on his care team and others who witnessed his efforts, Trinity said in the release. UnityPoint Health – Trinity is proud to award Deacon Swim with the 2021 Rehabilitant of the Year to recognize his hard work, determination and perseverance, the organization said Monday. Russ Swim, left, is given the Rehabilitant of the Year award by Ryan Heuer, UnityPoint Health -- Trinity's manager of inpatient rehabilitation therapy. “Deacon Russ Swim is an inspiration to others who may be struggling through their own recovery. Deacon Swim used his positive attitude to make his way through the toughest portions of his recovery plan," said Ryan Heuer, manager of Trinity’s inpatient rehabilitation therapy program. "We are proud to recognize him as this year’s award recipient." “I learned a lot from Deacon Swim as we worked through his care plan after his stroke,” said Anthony H. Kwan, MD, Deacon Swim’s physiatrist. “He approached each day with determination and optimism, even when he was struggling. He’s an inspiration and I’m proud of him and all my patients who trust Trinity with their rehabilitation care.” If you’d like to learn more about UnityPoint Health – Trinity Rehabilitation Services, visit unitypoint.org, or call 309-779-3176 for inpatient services – or 309-581-7640 for questions about outpatient therapy services.

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Muscatine Fire responds to second kitchen fire in a week

There's about $45,000 of damage to a Muscatine house after a fire early Monday morning. Muscatine Fire said they received the call around 5:48 a.m., and upon arrival found smoke and flames coming from windows in the first floor kitchen area. Once inside, they found the fire was contained mostly to the kitchen. The fire was under control in around 10 minutes. The occupants were out of the house before the fire department arrived. There were no injuries. A cause has not yet been determined. The occupants were referred to the Salvation Army and were offered assistance from 1-800-BoardUp. 11 firefighters responded in total, with some assistance from the Muscatine Police Department.

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Hampton announced boil alert

The Village of Hampton announced a boil order in effect until further notice. A water main break on 1st Avenue caused the need for the order. Areas affected are in the 800 block from the railroad tracks to 1st Avenue to the 700 block to 1st Avenue. 

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Village of Hampton under a boil order

Village officials are asking all residents to boil their water until further notice.

OurQuadCities.com Much more than 55-year age difference separates Iowa's Grassley and Finkenauer in Senate race OurQuadCities.com

Much more than 55-year age difference separates Iowa's Grassley and Finkenauer in Senate race

When Abby Finkenauer was born, Iowa’s Chuck Grassley had already been in the U.S. Senate for nearly eight years. The feisty, 33-year-old Dubuque native is hoping to send the 88-year-old Washington insider retiring for good this November, seeking the Democratic nomination for Senate. “It’s not so much the fact that he’s 88 as the fact that he’s been there for 47 years,” a frustrated Finkenauer said Sunday on Local 4’s “4 The Record,” noting the time Grassley has been in Congress. He was first elected to the U.S. House in 1974 and the Senate in 1980. “What has he done lately?” “I don’t even think they know why they’re there anymore,” she said of longtime members of Congress. “It’s really disappointing to see how the special interests have taken hold of these folks and it’s why I think term limits are so important and it’s time we replace Chuck Grassley.” In her 2022 campaign announcement, Finkenauer said politicians like Grassley “who’ve been there for decades, don’t really want us there. They think they own democracy, and they were silent when it was attacked,” she said of the violent insurrection at the Capitol Jan. 6, 2021. “It’s politicians like Senator Grassley and Mitch McConnell who should know better – but are so obsessed with power that they oppose anything that moves us forward. “Since the Capitol was attacked, they’ve turned their backs on democracy and on us,” Finkenauer said. She is calling for 12-year term limits for Congress – two terms in the Senate and six in the House. There are self-imposed term limits this year for many. As of this month, 47 members of Congress—six members of the U.S. Senate and 41 members of the U.S. House—have announced they will not seek re-election. Thirty-two members—six senators and 26 representatives—have announced their retirement. Five retiring Senate members are Republicans and one a Democrat, and of the retiring House members, 20 are Democrats and six are Republicans. According to a September 2021 Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll, Grassley led Finkenauer by 18 points among likely voters, 55% to 37%. Another 7% were not sure who they would vote for in a head-to-head matchup, and 1% said they would not vote. window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7335546","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p1","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","script":"//w3.mp.lura.live/player/prod/v3/plugins/comscore/comscoreplugin.min.js","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"video":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""},"ad":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7335546%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3Dna003%26pagetype%3Dsubindex"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3MzM1NTQ2IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NDMwNjUyMTJ9.r2ZVRwMC_AfgbIg1xPU6Y7JGdap4xwl4SbK1iYxhN8Q","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7335546?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6Su6dJYDa0S5MidXYV%2BqVLloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60}); Democracy is in trouble now because of the corporate special interests that have this grip on politicians, Finkenauer said on Local 4. “It’s gross and it’s what is wrong with politics today,” she said. “The more I’ve gone out and talked to Iowans across the state, the more they feel it as well.” It’s not just Grassley, though, Finkenauer said. “This seat belongs to Iowans, not the Grassley name. It’s about time we give it back to Iowans – which is why I would not serve more than two terms in the U.S. Senate.” Among three Democrats seeking the chance to unseat Grassley, she said she’s the best choice since she loves Iowa; is the daughter of a union pipefitter/welder and public school secretary, and veteran of two years in the U.S. House. “I saw folks like my dad getting screwed,” Finkenauer said, “when it comes to workers’ rights. We saw that play out in Davenport, when it came to John Deere and the UAW strike. They had such a loud message – hey, we’re here, we deserve dignity, we deserve respect. And that’s why I got into this in the first place, because I saw that slipping away from our politics.” Touting strong grass roots Finkenauer channeled her family’s tradition of public service by running for the Iowa House of Representatives when she was just 24 years old – and winning. She opposed massive corporate giveaways to out-of-state companies, fought to make high-quality health care available to all Iowans and supported high-quality education for all students. Finkenauer is a 33-year-old Dubuque native, who lives in Cedar Rapids, and served one term in Congress, from 2019-2021. Four years later, Finkenauer ran for Congress, becoming the youngest woman to flip a Congressional seat from red to blue and became one of the first women to represent Iowa in the House of Representatives. She was the youngest woman ever to pass a bill in the House – a bipartisan bill focused on supporting small businesses. In Congress, she built a reputation as someone who would work with anyone in either party to get things done, including funding the Children’s Health Insurance Program, strengthening Iowa’s flood prevention infrastructure and securing needed resources for our rural communities. A lifelong Iowan who chose to stay even while watching so many of the friends she grew up with move out of state, Finkenauer and her husband Daniel were married in August 2020 in their backyard in Cedar Rapids, where they continue to reside. Finkenauer represented Iowa's 1st Congressional District, from January 2019 to January 2021. She lost the 2020 election to Republican Ashley Hinson, 51.2%-48.6%, or less than 11,000 votes. “I just tried to keep my head down and do my job, and that’s what I think Iowans deserve,” Finkenauer said recently. Finkenauer lost a close re-election bid in 2020 for Iowa's 1st Congressional District, to Republican Ashley Hinson. She was one of the first two women to win election to the U.S. House from Iowa in history. The other, Cindy Axne (D), also won election in 2018. At the time of her election, Finkenauer was also the second-youngest woman (at age 29) to be elected to the U.S. Congress. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D) in New York, who also won election in 2018, was also 29 but born later than Finkenauer. Prior to serving in Congress, Finkenauer worked for a Dubuque-area nonprofit and served as a member of the Iowa House of Representatives from 2015 to 2019. 2022 will be one of the biggest mistakes Republicans ever made, having Grassley run for re-election, she said. “I have seen what he has done and what he hasn’t done over 47 years,” Finkenauer said. “Stuff I did in the last two, I would put up against what he’s done in the last 10 to 20 years any day of the week. The work we have left to do for Iowans – people are tired of the bickering, tired of sitting in these seats forever.” Running against Grassley will be a stark contrast, she said. “I am really worried about the state of affairs, whether it’s in Iowa or it’s in Washington, D.C. We deserve better.” “I’ve served in Washington, and I’ve seen firsthand how decades in D.C. can change people. I’ve watched Washington politicians who don’t even know why they’re running for office anymore, politicians who just want to keep a seat for the perks of the job or to create some sort of dynasty. We need fresh perspectives and people who are serving to do the work, not sitting there as barriers just to keep Washington broken. Finkenauer is the daughter of a union pipefittter/welder and a public school secretary. “That’s why I’ve come to support term limits that ban members of Congress from serving more than 12 years in office.  “Iowa’s Senate seat belongs to Iowans, not the Grassley family name. And if Iowans trust me with the honor of serving them in the Senate, I’ll return this seat to them and step down after two terms so that our future leaders, rooted in Iowa, can step up and fight for us all. “Even Chuck Grassley once agreed. Sen. Grassley has been voting for 12-year term limits for at least 30 years. However, as the decades roll by, Sen. Grassley seems to only truly support them for everyone else but himself. It’s clear that over the decades, D.C. has changed Chuck Grassley, and he does what he’s told by lobbyists and corporate industry donors rather than the Iowans he represents. “Senator, enough is enough. 63 years in public office and 47 years in Washington D.C. is too damn long," Finkenauer said. Showing up for her state When she was in D.C., she didn’t join a specific caucus of Congressional reps. “I didn’t fit in any of them, and I had no interest in joining something that just told me how to vote – versus going and showing up for my state every single day,” Finkenauer said. window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7335952","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p2","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","script":"//w3.mp.lura.live/player/prod/v3/plugins/comscore/comscoreplugin.min.js","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"video":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""},"ad":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7335952%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3Dna003%26pagetype%3Dsubindex"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3MzM1OTUyIiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NDMwNjUyMTJ9.xQIgoYvXvgij4fiYnknHsPjP-EcQ0hLaWKbJOqJYj34","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://m104216-gcdn.mp.lura.live/1/938841/1221/22/01/21/7335952/7335952_620C687B03EBD5D8893DE4C83458D102_220121_7335952_4TR_Finkenauer_ok_with_some__not_all_of_Build_Ba_1200.mp4","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60}); “It’s why I’ve been the only federal Democrat to win Dubuque County since 2014, because those are the folks I show up for,” she said. “This is not about just some title. It’s about public service and it’s something that I take very seriously and it’s something we need more of in the United States Senate.” In Grassley’s last campaign, in 2016, he beat Democrat Patty Judge 60.1 percent to 35.6 percent (there were also three independent candidates). “He’s actually the least popular he’s ever been, because he’s been in D.C. too dang long,” Finkenauer said. “I don’t care who you are; 47 years in Washington is too dang long for anybody and you don’t need another six. I truly believe that Iowans see that as well.” She said Grassley hasn’t been held accountable for his positions on many issues, including the Republicans’ persistent attempts to overthrow the Affordable Care Act. Finkenauer supports eliminating the filibuster, since some Senators hide behind it. “It’s this archaic rule that was made up decades ago, where you just bring it up so you don’t have to be on record on the specific vote,” she said. “Getting rid of the filibuster would bring more transparency, because you would bring more people together, have to work with each other. “When it comes to voting rights in particular, we’ve gotta get that done,” she said. Abby Finkenauer appearing on WHBF's "4 The Record" on Sunday, Jan. 23, 2022. What has ruined bipartisanship is gerrymandering, where districts are redrawn to be so far left or right, Finkenauer said. “They won’t even talk to each other because they’re afraid they’re gonna get primaried. That’s what is hurting our country right now and that’s why we need real reform.” She also supports paid family leave and to allow Medicare to negotiate with drug companies, to bring down the cost of prescriptions. “This is the type of stuff we need to be doing to move things forward,” she said. “Put those savings into hearing and vision coverage. That is huge – how can we afford not to do that?” For his part, Grassley has said people are “are fed up with the one-size-fits-all, Washington-knows-best approach,” he said in a recent email. “On top of that, the Biden administration’s agenda to push transformational change on the economy, our elections and our way of life would create unprecedented dependency on government with suffocating taxes that restrict economic freedom and deficit spending for generations to come. Republican Chuck Grassley, 88, was first elected to the U.S. House in 1974 and the U.S;. Senate in 1980. “That’s not what Iowans want. In my county meetings and conversations around the state, I’m hearing directly from farmers who are worried about the rising costs of fertilizer and delays in the supply chain as they prepare for spring planting,” Grassley said. “Cattle feeders and consumers are getting squeezed by the Big Four meatpackers and that’s why I’m pushing for price discovery and transparency in livestock marketing to ensure farmers get fair prices for their beef. “Businesses, hospitals and nursing homes are struggling to hire enough workers to serve their communities,” he said. “The Biden administration’s open borders policy is giving free rein to dangerous drug cartels to funnel fentanyl and methamphetamine into our communities. It’s no coincidence there is an alarming rise in overdose deaths in the United States with lawlessness at our southern border. This year I’ll continue pressing for passage and grow support for my bipartisan bill to reduce prescription drug costs, an issue that comes up at nearly all of my county meetings.” The Democratic primary will be held June 7, and the general election will be Nov. 8, 2022.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Police: Third suspect identified in Rock Island armed robbery

Police said he remains in custody at the Scott County Jail pending extradition.

WQAD.com '99 US Women's World Cup champs to host soccer camp in QC WQAD.com

'99 US Women's World Cup champs to host soccer camp in QC

U.S. National Team legends Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilly and Tisha Venturini are bringing TeamFirst Soccer Academy to the Quad Cities this March.

OurQuadCities.com RIPD identified 3rd suspect in armed robbery OurQuadCities.com

RIPD identified 3rd suspect in armed robbery

Detectives with the Rock Island Police Department identified the third suspect in the armed robbery January 18. Members of the Davenport Police Department took Shauntez D. Thomas, 22, of Rock Island into custody Sunday, January 23 for a parole violation warrant. On Monday, January 24, the Rock Island Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division obtained an arrest warrant for Thomas for the charge of armed robbery, a class X felony, with a bond set at $500,000.00. Thomas remains in custody at the Scott County Jail pending extradition.

OurQuadCities.com Sheriff's office: 28 dogs, 1 cat rescued from neglect OurQuadCities.com

Sheriff's office: 28 dogs, 1 cat rescued from neglect

Dozens of dogs and one cat have been rescued from what the Muscatine County Sheriff's Office calls a neglect situation. On Tuesday, Jan. 18, the Muscatine County Sheriff’s Office began to investigate allegations of animal neglect. The complaint, brought forward by and with information obtained by It Takes A Village Animal Rescue and Resources out of Muscatine, alleged a woman was living in a camper on a property with dozens of dogs and one cat, and that the camper was uninhabitable due its condition, a news release says.   Based on the information, a State of Iowa search warrant was obtained. On Wednesday, Jan. 19, the Muscatine County Sheriff’s Office, with the assistance of Muscatine County Zoning Office and It Takes A Village Rescue and Resources, executed the search warrant at the property and on the camper.   Upon arrival, a single drop cord was found running from the residence on the property to the camper. The windows on the camper were iced over. Officers found 28 dogs and one cat throughout the camper. The camper was confirmed to be uninhabitable because of feces and odor from the feces, the release says. The property owners were provided notice by Muscatine County Zoning officials that the trailer on the property was deemed a dangerous building and was unsafe for human occupancy, the release says. The woman living in the camper with the animals is not a property owner, the release says.  The Muscatine County Sheriff’s Office contracted with It Takes A Village Animal Rescue and Resources for the maintenance of the rescued animals. The animals will be cared for and remain with them until dispositional proceedings can be held in Muscatine County Court, the release says.   The investigation continues.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Illinois offering paid COVID leave for vaccinated teachers

We want people to stay home when they’re sick, to be able to care for their children when their children need them the most, and to be paid when the circumstances

OurQuadCities.com Illinois to allow COVID sick leave for school staff OurQuadCities.com

Illinois to allow COVID sick leave for school staff

Governor JB Pritzker, the Illinois Education Association, the Illinois Federation of Teachers and other stakeholders announced an initiative that will keep students and teachers safely in the classroom without penalizing vaccinated employees for taking COVID-required sick time. According to a release, this initiative provides the following protections for educators, school employees and their families: Paid administrative leave for every employee of a public school district established under Article 10 or Article 34 of the School Code, public university, and public community college who isfully vaccinated or has received the required doses to become fully vaccinated within five weeks of the effective date of the Act and whois required, or whose child is required, to be excluded from school because of a positive COVID-19 test result or close contact with a person who had a confirmed case of COVID-19.has been required by the school or school district policy to be excluded from school district property due to COVID-19 symptoms. Restoration of sick leave for every employee of a public school district, public university, and public community college who is fully vaccinated or has received the required doses to become fully vaccinated within five weeks of the effective date of the Act, andwho has previously used their sick time because they or their child were required to be excluded from school because of a positive COVID-19 test result or close contact with a person who had a confirmed case of COVID-19has been required by the school or school district policy to be excluded from school district property due to COVID-19 symptoms. Maintains wage protections in HB 2778 for all hourly school employees, including but not limited to, custodial, transportation, food service providers, classroom assistants, or administrative staff. This protection applies for the entire 2021-22 school year, including any days that a school has already closed or switched to e-learning which caused the paraprofessional to go without pay or take their own earned paid time off. “Vaccines are a vital tool in preventing the deadly effects of COVID-19, and those who take the steps to be fully vaccinated against this virus are doing their part to keep everyone safe,” Governor JB Pritzker said. “They deserve to be able to take the time they need to respond to the ongoing devastating impacts the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have on them and their families.”  “Keeping schools open and those inside them – and their families – safe has been our number one priority from the start of the pandemic,” Kathi Griffin, President of the Illinois Education Association, said. “We want people to stay home when they’re sick, to be able to care for their children when their children need them the most, and to be paid when the circumstances that close their buildings are completely beyond their control.” “The pandemic has been physically, emotionally, and economically challenging for us all, and certainly no less so for educators, school staff, and their families,” Illinois Federation of Teachers President Dan Montgomery said. “This legislation provides important relief and ensures that education personnel can afford to take time off if they or they families become ill with COVID." As a result of this collaboration, Governor Pritzker is vetoing House Bill 2778.

WQAD.com Cedar Rapids nurse gets probation for stealing opioids from work WQAD.com

Cedar Rapids nurse gets probation for stealing opioids from work

Sabrina Thalblum, 52, diverted fentanyl for her own use at a local surgery center from 2018-2019.

OurQuadCities.com First-degree murder arrest warrant issued regarding Saturday shooting in Galesburg OurQuadCities.com

First-degree murder arrest warrant issued regarding Saturday shooting in Galesburg

Galesburg Police on Monday issued an arrest warrant for a 29-year-old man involved in a Saturday shooting. The incident currently under investigation occurred at 1517 McKnight Street in Galesburg on Jan. 22, 2022 at 4:20 a.m. Three subjects were shot during this incident: Mercedes B. Jones, age 29, was shot in the chest, and was transported by ambulance to St. Mary’s ER and then to St. Francis Hospital in Peoria. He is currently in being treated at St. Francis for his injuries.Jasmine L. Casey, age 26, was shot in the hand. She was transported to St. Mary’s ER and then transferred to St. Francis in Peoria. She is expected to be released from the hospital shortly.Demetruis D. Gibbs, age 31, was shot in the chest and found deceased at the scene. His family has been notified. An arrest warrant for first-degree murder has been issued for Jones, who will be taken into custody upon being released from the hospital, police said Monday.

OurQuadCities.com Rock Island County housing group wins $7 million in new funding, eyes new Silvis development OurQuadCities.com

Rock Island County housing group wins $7 million in new funding, eyes new Silvis development

A new 24-unit affordable housing development in Silvis will be built, thanks to new grants for the Rock Island Housing Finance Corporation (RICHFC), a nonprofit affiliate of the Greater Metropolitan Area Housing Authority of Rock Island County (GMAHA). RICHFC received $5,137,992 in a National Housing Trust Fund grant and a $859,485 State Housing Fund Loan (approved recently by the Illinois Housing Development Authority board), to be used for a new housing development, Apoyo Village. This is a 24-unit multifamily project, to offer supportive services and located in Silvis. "The development will help fill a tremendous gap in affordable rental housing options within the community by creating new units and including supportive services utilizing local human service agencies," according to a Monday press release. IHDA’s Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) Development Program's latest round received 17 applications, and Apoyo Village was one of only 10 to be chosen for funding, demonstrating the competitive nature of these resources, the agency announced. Greater Metropolitan Housing Authority of Rock Island County offers income-eligible households affordable, safe and friendly apartment living at several housing developments, currently in Moline, East Moline, Silvis and Milan. “We are thankful for the funding awarded to us by the Illinois Housing Development Authority, to further our mission to create and finance housing opportunities for the residents of Rock Island County," CEO Amy Clark said in the release, "whether those housing needs are affordable rental tied to supportive services or affordable homeownership. We now have the ability, through a multifaceted approach, to provide more targeted housing options to adequately fit each family’s individual dynamic." The PSH program is designed to finance developments that focus on residents who need supportive services in order to access and maintain affordable housing. As a nonprofit affiliate of the Greater Metropolitan Area Housing Authority of Rock Island County, the RICHFC is serving as the project’s sponsor, co-developer, and property manager. The Greater Metropolitan Housing Authority of Rock Island County aims to fill the gaps in affordable rental housing in the area. GMAHA has partnered with Domera Development, LLC, serving as the project’s developer. Domera is an experienced developer of affordable housing and permanent supportive housing, according to the release. The project’s architect is #9 Design, LLC d/b/a North Arrow Architecture, and La Mancha Construction d/b/a North Arrow Construction is serving as its general contractor. In addition to Apoyo Village, RICHFC was awarded $1,009,162 in State Donation Tax Credits to pilot its homebuyer program I-HOPE (Independence through Home Ownership Program Equity). I-HOPE is a new homeownership initiative developed by RICHFC to assist low to moderate income families in Rock Island County with down-payment and closing cost assistance, as well as mortgage principal reduction assistance. The goal of this program to move individuals and/or families along the housing continuum to self-sufficiency through pre-purchase education and financial literacy services, as well as post-purchase case management services. This program will offer up to $35,000 to each participating household through a forgivable grant. For more information about GMAHA and RICHFC, visit www.gmaharic.org.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Jo Daviess County Courthouse offices closed Monday

The closure is due to a water main break, county officials said.

OurQuadCities.com Jo Daviess County Courthouse closed due to water main break OurQuadCities.com

Jo Daviess County Courthouse closed due to water main break

According to a release, the Jo Daviess County Courthouse offices, located at 330 North Bench Street, Galena, will be closed the remainder of Monday, January 24 due to a water main break.  (Google Maps)

OurQuadCities.com Cars, trucks and bikes put on a show at the QCCA Expo Center OurQuadCities.com

Cars, trucks and bikes put on a show at the QCCA Expo Center

Car lovers were able to enjoy the annual QCCA Expo Winterfest Car, Truck and Bike Show on Sunday. This year, there were about 65 cars on display at the exhibition center in Rock Island. People were able to see all sorts of vintage cars and, after taking it all in, they could vote on their favorites. "It's really fun to be here and look at the cars and see the people and have the people enjoy the cars," said Bruce Cheek, Veterans Car Club of the Quad Cities president. Show director Robert Junker was pleased by this year's turnout. "Had a very good attendance on Friday and Saturday," said Junker. "So far, Sunday is looking really strong as well." If you missed this year's Winterfest Car, Truck and Bike Show, it will be held again in January 2023. Learn more about upcoming events by visiting the QCCA Expo Center website or Facebook page.

OurQuadCities.com Two Ambrose students win slots at national Kennedy Center theater fest, bittersweet for their veteran prof OurQuadCities.com

Two Ambrose students win slots at national Kennedy Center theater fest, bittersweet for their veteran prof

In the 30-plus years that Cory Johnson has taught theater at St. Ambrose University, this is the first time the private Davenport school is sending two students to the national Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF) in Washington, D.C., at the same time. Junior education major Peyton Reese and 2021 theater graduate Luke Peterson won this month’s musical theater and directing categories (respectively) in their region, and will be among about 125 outstanding theater students at the KCACTF National Festival in April. Student awardees in design, performance, directing, playwriting, stage management, dramaturgy, arts leadership, and theatre criticism, are invited from all eight regions. SAU (which has had many theater students go on to nationals) competes in Region V – encompassing Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. “It’s hard to get kids motivated to do things when it's not in person, you know, and so I was really, really happy with as many students who were willing to really do a lot of work,” Johnson said Monday of the virtual competition format, for the second straight year. “We were here filming and coaching all through the holiday break. And one of the students drove 2 hours to do an hour and half of coaching with me. I'm thinking, man, these kids are the best.”  KCACTF is a regional theater festival that provides students opportunities to learn about many aspects of theatre, as well as experiences to help them in the professional scene after graduation. The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. Typically, the festival takes place in person, but because of COVID, the festival was virtual for the second year in a row. While this wasn't as exciting or hands-on as an in-person festival would be, the online format made it more accessible to all students in terms of cost and schedule. “The virtual format is less stressful for me because I don't have to miss any classes for the festival, and I can record my audition videos as many times as I want,” junior Quinnie Rodman (Reese’s scene partner from “Brighton Beach Memoirs”) said before this month’s event. “While I am disappointed that the festival is being held virtually for the second year in a row, I am still excited to participate.” At KCACTF, the Musical Theatre Intensive, Professional Auditions, and the Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship auditions have all proven to be popular events for Ambrose students. This year's Irene Ryan nominees included senior Kyle DeFauw and junior Amber Cook from the SAU production of Two Rooms; senior Joseph Lasher and junior Peyton Reese from Admissions; senior Nikki DeWitt, senior Rebecca Meissen, and junior David Weaver from Romeo and Juliet; and seniors K. Hampton and Nyssa Wagner from She Kills Monsters. Reese, a Davenport Central alum, is a SAU junior education major. Reese has made the regional Musical Theatre Intensive finals twice and Irene Ryan finals once before. “I am so incredibly excited to participate in my third KCACTF Festival,” she said before competing. “While it is a lot of work to pick acting pieces, memorize everything, and record your auditions, the payoff is definitely worth it.” Reese sang “Don’t Rain On My Parade” (from “Funny Girl”) and “How Did We Come to This?” (from “The Wild Party”) to advance. Johnson thanked Duke Schneider from Ambrose’s communications department for doing the excellent video work for students. “He spent an inordinate amount of time with us,” she said. “And while the video does not win anything, the sound quality and the pictures were so great.”  Reese (a Davenport Central alum) posted on Facebook of winning the region, among more than 100 students in the Musical Theatre Intensive: “It was such an honor to receive feedback from so many wonderful professionals in both the MTI and Irene Ryan categories,” she said. “A huge congratulationsto my friends at SAU who made the semifinals and finals in either category (Kyle DeFauw, Quinnie Rodman, Joseph Lasher, Katie Link, K Leigh Allison), as well as my good friend Luke Peterson, who took first place in the SDCs and will be going to Nationals alongside me! “Thank you to all of those who made this possible, especially Cory Johnson, Don Schneider, and Ron May. You are all incredible and I could not have sent in the work I did without your help,” Reese wrote. “Thank you all for your guidance, your skills, and of course, your endless support and encouragement. It’s been a wonderful festival and I am so lucky to have such a great support system at home and at SAU.” Reese singing in her 2022 regional Kennedy Center festival video. In June 2019, Reese won top honors at the Iowa High School Musical Theater Awards with the "Triple Threat Award,” along with Cole Strelecki of West Des Moines Valley. The awards annually recognize a top male and female student. Reese went to New York City to represent Iowa at the National High School Musical Theatre Awards, known as the Jimmys, for a week of private coaching, master classes and rehearsals with Broadway professionals. Their experience culminated with a final performance June 24, 2019 at the Minskoff Theatre, home to Disney’s “The Lion King” on Broadway. Peterson – now a full-time actor/educator at Climb Theatre in Minneapolis -- was equally effusive about winning this year’s KCACTF directing intensive.  “Ever since my freshman year, after seeing a friend qualify for the National Festival in the Stage Management event, I set a goal of qualifying for Nationals myself,” he posted on Facebook. “While I could have never pictured the circumstances surrounding my Regional win, this year’s Festival has reaffirmed to me that if you work hard and ALWAYS try your best, things will work out for you eventually, because people want to work with people who always try their best. “Going into this Festival, I made it known to all my friends that I wanted at least one of us to advance to the National Festival, since it is our wonderful mentor, Cory’s last KCACTF as an SAU professor,” Peterson wrote, noting Katie Link (a junior communications major) earned Honorable Mention in musical theater for the region. Junior Katie Link singing in her 2022 KCACTF video. “To Cory, and everyone else who has ever supported me, the sincerest of thank yous!! I try my best to make you proud each and every day!!” he posted. “And to Peyton, we did it, friend!! From Irene partners your freshman year to National KCACTF qualifiers your junior year, I love you so SO much, and I am so proud of you!! What an exciting way to end my KCACTF Region 5 journey!!” Peterson, a theater major, served as Business Manager for the KCACTF Region V Student Advisory Board. For his directing category, he didn’t get to work with students in person, like the festival usually does, but students still did a script analysis and had to put together a prompt book with their concept presentation, Johnson said Bittersweet end to theater major Johnson, 63, has been a theater professor at SAU since 1989 and is leaving after this school year, since the school decided to eliminate the theater major in October 2020. Cory Johnson will end an impressive 33-year career as St. Ambrose theater professor after this school year. “I thought they were keeping the faculty. Well, they did for a year and now all of our majors are gone,” she said Monday. “There's just nothing for us to do…I love working with these kids and they gave me a really great sendoff for my last year.” Theater department chair Dan Rairdin-Hale is staying on faculty, but Johnson and theater professor Kris Eitrheim (who’s taught stagecraft, scene design, stage lighting, American film, advanced stage technologies and computer-aided design for the theater) are leaving after the spring semester. “Cory Johnson and Kris Eitrheim are retiring this spring after a combined 64 years of valued and dedicated service to St. Ambrose University and its students,” SAU spokesman Craig DeVrieze said Monday. “Their positions were not eliminated. The university continues to offer theatre as a minor and theatre programming.”  Staffing and budgeting decisions for the fall 2022 semester have not yet been made, he noted. In October 2020, Paul Koch, the SAU Provost and Vice President for Academics and Student Affairs, said that following a review process and recommendation, the university decided to close the theater major, and no incoming students starting fall 2021 could declare that as a major. Over 2,800 people signed a petition in 2020 opposing elimination of the theater major, which has produced many students who have won KCACTF regional honors. The national Irene Ryan scholarships are made possible by the generosity of the late actress (1902-1973) best remembered for her portrayal of Granny Clampett in “The Beverly Hillbillies.” Irene Ryan (right) is most famous for playing Granny on "The Beverly Hillbillies." St. Ambrose has had three students win first place in acting at regionals: Rairdin-Hale in 2003, Daniel Sheridan in 2005 and Anthony Stratton in 2013. SAU had two students in stage management advance to nationals – in 2016, Shannon Rourke, who went on to work for the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, and Hannah Donovan in 2018. Those evaluations at the theater festival included a stage-manager prompt book, two rigorous interviews and letters of recommendation. A prompt book is a script with all the blocking, movement and cues for lines, light, sound and props notated. In 2020, Ambrose student Jaren Schoustra won the theatre criticism regional award, but that year’s national festival was canceled due to COVID. Ambrose has produced many successful theater alumni – including actress, producer and casting director Kim Kurtenbach; Daniel Sheridan, who’s former artistic director of Davenport Junior Theatre and is performing arts supervisor for the city of Davenport; River Music Experience executive director Tyson Danner, and Emmy-award winning Brian Hemesath, who has designed costumes for shows on and off-Broadway, as well as TV’s “Saturday Night Live” and “Sesame Street.” Brian Hemesath shows off one of his Emmys at SAU with Cory Johnson, left, and Dianne Dye. In July 2020, Hemesath (a ’94 SAU theater alum) won his third Daytime Emmy Award for his work on “Sesame Street,” after a total of eight Emmy nominations. He also was an assistant costume designer on the critically acclaimed “West Side Story” film, directed by Steven Spielberg and released last month. “Without the theatre major, Brian would not have attended St. Ambrose,” the online petition said. “Even if he had attended as a theatre minor, based off the current requirements, he would not have been required to take Introduction to Design. It may not have even been offered.” Though Ambrose no longer offers the major, its department website says: “No matter if your dream lies behind the scenes or at center stage, our theatre program is vibrant, active, and will help you prepare for the career of your dreams. “Our graduates work on Broadway, in L.A. and Chicago as actors, teachers, stage managers, and costume designers; for Davenport Junior Theatre, Goodman Theatre, and St. Croix Festival Theatre,” the site says. Unknown if Kennedy Center will be in-person While this month’s festival was online, like last year, it’s undecided whether the nationals will be in person, Johnson said. “That is the million-dollar question. Nobody knows. I was just one of the coordinators for this and we just had a two-hour-long meeting yesterday,” she said Monday. “I think it's going to come down to the 11th hour. I know because from week-to-week, they just don't know what is going to be able to be done. And that also scares me that, that they won’t have the big heavy-hitter names that they would typically have there, to carve out this time and make sure that it's going to happen.” The weeklong program at the Kennedy Center is invaluable for students, Johnson said. “They have workshops all day long, with big names that we would all know, in the field. And then they perform ultimately, in evenings on the last few nights. It’s just a mountain-top experience.” The festival typically involves 18,000 students annually from colleges and universities across the country. KCACTF aims to: Encourage, recognize, and celebrate the finest and most diverse work produced in university and college theater programs;Provide opportunities for participants to develop their theater skills and insight, and achieve professionalism;Improve the quality of college and university theater in the United States; andEncourage colleges and universities to give distinguished productions of new plays, especially those written by students; the classics, revitalized or newly conceived; and experimental works. Since its inception, KCACTF has given more than 400,000 college theater students the opportunity to have their work critiqued, improve their dramatic skills, and receive national recognition for excellence. More than 16 million theatergoers have attended 10,000 festival productions nationwide, according to the event website. “There are a plethora of opportunities that are intended to enhance these wonderful people's futures," Johnson said of nationals. "I won't say that there's no competition involved, but there is much more of a focus on opportunity building and fitting the right student with what their aspirations are and the wonderful internships and fellowships. That's kind of the focus, much more educational than competitive at that point.” In spring 2018, Johnson directed the musical "Cabaret" at Galvin Fine Arts Center, which featured Luke Peterson (kneeling, center). In January 2017, Johnson herself earned The Kennedy Center Medallion from the KCACTF. Each year, the eight regions honor individuals or organizations that have made extraordinary contributions to teaching and producing theater, and who have "significantly dedicated their time, artistry and enthusiasm to the development" of the festival, according to the prize summary. "Most importantly, recipients have demonstrated a strong commitment to the values and goals of KCACTF and to excellence in educational theater," it says, noting the gold medallion is the most prestigious regional award given by KCACTF and is considered one of the great honors in theater education. “I just loved my job here but it's kind of a tough way to end it, I must admit,” Johnson said Monday. To see a video of Peyton Reese singing, click HERE. To see Katie Link singing, click HERE.

QCOnline.com Hope seen once the omicron wave increases global immunity QCOnline.com

Hope seen once the omicron wave increases global immunity

World health officials are offering hope that the ebbing of the omicron wave could give way to a new, more manageable phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, even as they warn of difficult weeks ahead and the possibility of another, more…

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Neighbors react to house fire that left woman, infant dead

Residents from a Macomb neighborhood said they are shaken up after a fire killed a woman and an infant yesterday.

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New bill could allow more health care workers to administer vaccines in Iowa

An Iowa House subcommittee is expected to discuss a new bill that would expand the number of health care workers allowed to administer vaccines at facilities in the state.

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First Alert Day from 12 AM Tuesday until 3 PM Wednesday for dangerous wind chills

Wind chills will be below zero Tuesday and through the early afternoon Wednesday.

OurQuadCities.com Lovefest unites community through cultural differences OurQuadCities.com

Lovefest unites community through cultural differences

A Multicultural Lovefest took place over the weekend in Davenport. The event gave a chance for people of different backgrounds to come together and talk to one another in an effort to learn more. Students from Pakistan, Turkey, Switzerland, Israel and Nigeria shared their stories. This event was put together by Kinna's House of Love. Luekinna Hodges, founder of the nonprofit, spoke with Local 4 News at the event on Sunday and says she feels that it's important for people to learn about other people's culture and beliefs. "They explain their beliefs and traditions, and they're different from ours," said Hodges. "And I made that clear before we started … no matter what they believe in, that's their world, and we need to respect that." Hy-Vee also provided free pizza for anyone who decided to come by.

WQAD.com Family sues Iowa school district over sexual assault WQAD.com

Family sues Iowa school district over sexual assault

The lawsuit alleges the way the Dubuque school district responded to bullying contributed to a girl being sexually assaulted at school in 2019.

OurQuadCities.com Hancock, Henderson Counties to implement 911 testing OurQuadCities.com

Hancock, Henderson Counties to implement 911 testing

Hancock/Henderson Counties 911 dispatch will begin testing for the new 911 system. According to a release, 911 dispatchers will be calling citizens and businesses in Henderson County who have landline telephones to complete address confirmations. They will give you a 10 digit telephone number to call them back on. The call back number will begin with 309-944-****. This will ring into the emergency dispatch center, where they will check to see if the caller’s information will populate correctly in the software. This will allow them to confirm the information is correct. Please do not dismiss the call as being a telemarketer or spam. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated and our new 911 system will be fully operational soon after testing is completed. Chief Deputy Matthew Link, Henderson County Sheriff's Office

QCOnline.com US pharmacies are rolling out free N95 masks as free Covid-19 tests begin to arrive in the mail QCOnline.com

US pharmacies are rolling out free N95 masks as free Covid-19 tests begin to arrive in the mail

Just as free Covid-19 tests are landing in the mailboxes of people who ordered them, the first free N95 masks for the public have started to arrive at US pharmacies, with more on the way in the coming days.

OurQuadCities.com 'Divine Nine' black sororities and fraternities in Quad Cities cultivate legacy of support and service OurQuadCities.com

'Divine Nine' black sororities and fraternities in Quad Cities cultivate legacy of support and service

Joining a fraternity or sorority can be a big part of the college years. However, there are nine historically black sororities and fraternities that go beyond the typical undergrad experience. These organizations are referred to as the "Divine Nine;” they provide service, scholarship, community development and a sense of belonging for a lifetime.   “A lifelong dream of mine," Quad Cities Alpha Kappa Alpha chapter president Ashley Allen said. The "Divine Nine" dates to 1906. It is comprised of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity (1906), Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority(1908), Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity (1911), Omega Psi Phi fraternity (1911), Delta Sigma Theta sorority (1913), Phi Beta Sigma fraternity (1914) , Zeta Phi Beta sorority (1930),  Sigma Gamma Rho sorority (1937) and Iota Phi Theta fraternity (1996).   "A great honor to be able to wear these letters," Allen said. For decades the "Divine Nine" has been a pillar in the black community providing service, scholarship and most importantly, a sense of belonging. "Sisterhood is just like a second family. They’re with you forever," Quad Cities Delta Sigma Theta rep Benita Moore said. Some notable members of the "Divine Nine" are vice president Kamala Harris, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr, comedian Steve Harvey and civil rights leader Shirley Chisolm. However, their presence goes beyond notoriety. Over of the past year, the divine nine has given out millions in scholarships, even right here in the Quad Cities “Not only do I represent this organization I represent this community" Quad Cities Omega Psi Phi member Justin Johnson said. Park cleanups, voter registration, food drives and college prep are just a few of the many ways divine nine impacts the community.

OurQuadCities.com St. Ambrose to start Civil Rights Week with Silent March to Remember OurQuadCities.com

St. Ambrose to start Civil Rights Week with Silent March to Remember

St. Ambrose University invites you to kick off Civil Rights Week with the annual Silent March to Remember. Beginning with a reflection from President Amy Novak in the lower entrance to Cosgrove Hall, located next to Ambrose Hall off of West Locust Street. Participants will march along Harrison Street to the Northeast corner of 12th Street, where a Davenport Civil Rights marker celebrates the 1945 landmark discrimination case that upheld Charles Toney’s complaint that he and his future wife, Ann, were denied the right to buy ice cream based on the color of their skin. Toney was the first black student to enroll at St. Ambrose and a leader in the Civil Rights movement in Davenport. Marchers will return to the BeeHive on the lower level of Ambrose Hall for hot chocolate and conversation. The St. Ambrose Silent March to Remember is Monday, January 24, 3:00-4:00 p.m. For more information about Civil Rights Week at St. Ambrose, click here.

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Davenport Police investigating robbery at Family Credit Union

Police say a suspect entered the business and demanded money from a teller.

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11 Years Ago, Flav’s Fried Chicken Opened Its Doors In Clinton, Iowa [PHOTOS]

Continue reading…

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Attacking Trafficking holds annual prayer service to end human trafficking

The National Human Trafficking Hotline reported 285 calls about human trafficking cases and issues related to human trafficking in Iowa in 2020.

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Man facing DUI charge in connection with crash that killed man, injured Sterling police officer

The crash happened at 12:48 a.m. Sunday.

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One person arrested after fatal crash early Sunday

One person was killed and another injured in an early-morning crash Sunday in Sterling, Ill. At the request of Sterling Police, Whiteside County Deputies responded to the area of 1st Avenue at Wallace Street in Sterling for a two vehicle crash shortly after 12:45 a.m. Sunday, a news release says. A Chevrolet Colorado driven by Wayne A. Witt, 46, of Sterling, was traveling north on the 1st Avenue Bridge. A Sterling Police squad car was sitting with its emergency lights activated in the southbound lane of travel. Sterling Police Officer Travis Nease was standing to the rear of his squad car talking to pedestrian Drew W. Barger, 35, of Sterling. While Nease was trying to speak to Barger, Witt crossed the center line and struck the squad car, Nease and Barger, who remained trapped under Witt’s vehicle, the release says. Next, Witt’s vehicle continued north before it crashed into the viaduct center support and came to rest. Responding agencies rendered aid to Nease and Barger, who died from his injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene by Whiteside County Coroner Joe McDonald, the release says. Nease was treated and released at CGH Medical Center. After Whiteside County Deputies conducted a DUI investigation, Witt was arrested and charged with aggravated DUI. The investigation continues and more charges are pending, the release says. Assisting agencies included the Illinois State Police, Sterling Fire Department, Rock Falls Police Department, CGH EMS, and the Whiteside County Corner.

Sunday, January 23rd, 2022

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QC Red Cross shares winter fire safety tips

The American Red Cross provides many services to families who become victims of a house fire.

WQAD.com Attacking Trafficking holds annual prayer service to end human trafficking WQAD.com

Attacking Trafficking holds annual prayer service to end human trafficking

The National Human Trafficking Hotline reported 285 calls about human trafficking cases and issues related to human trafficking in Iowa in 2020.

OurQuadCities.com Prom dress giveaway ensures it will be a 'Night to Shine' for those with special needs OurQuadCities.com

Prom dress giveaway ensures it will be a 'Night to Shine' for those with special needs

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed just about everything for everything, but for one local organization, the prom must go on. A prom dress giveaway was held Saturday by the Quad Cities chapter of the Tim Tebow Foundation so anyone in the Quad Cities can dress up for "Night to Shine" — a special night celebrating those ages 14 and older with special needs. Representatives from the Quad Cities chapter want to make sure all in attendance have a new prom dress to wear to the event — even though it won't be in person. "We've gotten a bunch of donations of dresses to give to our guests, and since it's not a live event, we haven't had a lot of people come out because, obviously, there's not a dance to go to, so we have a bunch of dresses. We're trying to give them away to guests for 'Night to Shine.'" Registration for the event is open here until Friday, Jan. 28, or sooner if capacity is reached. Volunteers are needed 4 to 7 p.m. for the Night to Shine Through Parade 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11, at the Iowa National Guard Armory, 5300 Kimberly Road, Davenport. Register to volunteer here.

Quad-City Times Another week of up and down temperatures, including single digit highs for Tuesday Quad-City Times

Another week of up and down temperatures, including single digit highs for Tuesday

An expected high temperature Monday of 32 degrees will be followed Tuesday by a high of 8, setting off another week of up-and-down temperatures, Meteorologist Brian Pierce of the National Weather Service said Saturday night.

WQAD.com Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling - Rock Falls bridge WQAD.com

Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling - Rock Falls bridge

Around midnight on Sunday, a driver hit and killed a pedestrian and injured an officer on the First Avenue Bridge in Sterling.

WQAD.com Driver dead after crashing into tree near Harrison Street in Davenport WQAD.com

Driver dead after crashing into tree near Harrison Street in Davenport

A man was killed in a car accident after leaving the road and striking a tree in Davenport early Sunday morning.

WQAD.com Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling - Rock Falls bridge WQAD.com

Pedestrian killed, officer injured in crash on Sterling - Rock Falls bridge

Around midnight on Sunday, an driver struck a pedestrian and and officer on the First Avenue Bridge, killing the former and injuring the latter.

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Man charged with felony, speeding during traffic stop in Stockton

Deputies say they found approximately 947 grams of suspected cannabis contained in various bags during the traffic stop.

OurQuadCities.com Access to government buildings limited beginning Jan. 24 due to increase in COVID-19 cases OurQuadCities.com

Access to government buildings limited beginning Jan. 24 due to increase in COVID-19 cases

The City of West Burlington announced Sunday that it's limiting access to its government buildings until further notice. Beginning 7 a.m. Monday, Jan. 24, the lobbies of West Burlington City Hall and West Burlington Police Department will be closed to the public. According to a news release, this closure is "due to an increase in cases of COVID-19 and possible exposures to city staff." The City says they remain committed to serving citizens and will remain available at this time by appointment only. Citizens who need to contact either building are strongly encouraged to do so via phone or email. To reach City Hall, dial 319-752-5451 or email city@westburlington.org. To reach the police department for non-emergency and general inquiries, dial 319-754-8555 or email Chief of Police Jesse Logan, loganj@westburlington.org. The City also recommends visiting its website, which can provide answers to routine questions and be used as a resource for many application forms. Need to pay a bill? The City provides several options for citizens to pay monthly utility bills and urges people to utilize these services to limit in-person contact: Make online payments here.Drop payments off at the green payment dropbox located under the tree in the parking lot behind City Hall. The secure payment box is monitored by a surveillance camera and checked daily.Mail payments to 122 Broadway Street, West Burlington, IA 52665. The City thanks residents for their cooperation as they work to stop the spread of the virus.

QCOnline.com QCOnline.com

A stowaway was found alive in a plane wheel in Amsterdam after flying more than 11 hours

The man had been hiding for more than 11 hours since the plan departed from Johannesburg, South Africa, according to a spokesperson at Schiphol airport and police.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Driver dead after crashing into tree near Harrison Street in Davenport

A man was killed in a car accident after leaving the road and striking a tree in Davenport early Sunday morning.

OurQuadCities.com Help animals find their forever homes by becoming a 'virtual pet foster parent' OurQuadCities.com

Help animals find their forever homes by becoming a 'virtual pet foster parent'

Do you aspire to adopt or foster animals in need of homes, but life is holding you back? Maybe you have a no-pet policy, a full house, you work long hours, are allergic to pet dander or are simply afraid of bringing all of the animals home with you. Whatever the reason is, Quad City Animal Welfare Center invites you to become a "virtual pet foster parent." All you have to do is follow the animal shelter on Facebook and like, comment and share its posts. "The power of social media and your shares will help homeless animals find their forever homes, promote Quad City Animal Welfare Center fundraising efforts and bring awareness of needed services to our community," a news release says. Learn more about the animal shelter here.

WQAD.com 'Not your body. Not your choice' : Local leaders, activists gather to celebrate 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade WQAD.com

'Not your body. Not your choice' : Local leaders, activists gather to celebrate 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade

In December 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban. The decision, expected in June, could weaken or overturn Roe v. Wade.

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A woman and baby were killed in a Macomb house fire

As firefighters made their way inside the home, they found a woman and infant unresponsive.

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One man killed in Davenport car accident Sunday morning

A Jeep Liberty was reportedly traveling south on Harrison Street when it lost control, leaving the road and hitting a tree.

QCOnline.com With no end in sight to pandemic life, parents find disruption is the new normal QCOnline.com

With no end in sight to pandemic life, parents find disruption is the new normal

Parenting in the days of omicron is an awkward soup of fear, determination and gratitude for those doing the hard work of keeping schools working.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Fatal crash in Davenport claims the life of one man

Davenport Police said a fatal one-car accident Sunday morning in the 3200 block of Harrison Street claimed the life of a man

OurQuadCities.com Vehicle strikes tree in Davenport, killing driver OurQuadCities.com

Vehicle strikes tree in Davenport, killing driver

An adult male was killed in a single-vehicle accident early Sunday morning in Davenport. Crews from Davenport Police, Fire and Medic EMS responded to the 3200 block of Harrison Street at approximately 4:59 p.m. after a vehicle reportedly went off the roadway and struck a tree. A preliminary investigation indicated a Jeep Liberty was traveling southbound on Harrison Street and appeared to lose control. Police say the vehicle drove off the roadway to the west, where it struck a tree. The driver and sole occupant of the vehicle sustained fatal injuries, a news release says. It is believed that a combination of adverse roadway conditions and speed contributed to the crash. An investigation is underway by the Davenport Police Department, and no further information is available at this time.

OurQuadCities.com Madison Keys beats another top-ranked player, on to Australian Open quarterfinals OurQuadCities.com

Madison Keys beats another top-ranked player, on to Australian Open quarterfinals

Madison Keys continued her dominance at the 2022 Australian Open, beating No. 8 Paula Badosa on Saturday, to move on to the quarterfinals. It's her first appearance in a Grand Slam quarterfinals since 2019 Wimbledon. The Rock Island native beat the Spaniard in straight sets, 6-3, 6-1. It's her third straight sets win of the tournament. The only set she's dropped thus far was the first set against Wang Qiang in the third round. She needed a third set tie-breaker in that match to complete the come-from-behind victory. Unstoppable 💯@Madison_Keys is into the #AusOpen quarterfinals for the first time since 2018, taking down Paula Badosa 6-3 6-1. #AO2022 pic.twitter.com/dIGsi7zf5q— #AusOpen (@AustralianOpen) January 23, 2022 Next up, she gets another one of the world's top players in the Czech Republic's No. 4 Barbora Krejčíková. That match is for Monday. The time is TBD.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Iowa man faces felony drug charge following traffic stop in Illinois

An Iowa man is facing a felony drug charge after police located marijuana in his vehicle early Sunday morning following a traffic stop in Jo Daviess County. The traffic stop was performed around 1:04 a.m., when deputies spotted a vehicle speeding on U.S. Route 20, near Pearl Street, rural Stockton. When they approached the vehicle, deputies immediately recognized the strong odor of burnt cannabis emitting from it. After a search, deputies located approximately 947 grams of suspected cannabis in multiple bags. The man was identified as 37-year-old Jamal L. Curtis, of Dubuque. Curtis was charged with unlawful possession of cannabis, a Class 3 felony, and speeding. Other occupants of the vehicle included 29-year-old Richard M. Wilson, of Sauk Village, Ill., and 38-year-old Michael D. Harris, of Dubuque. Neither of these individuals were charged.

OurQuadCities.com WEB EXTRA Jan 6 Committee: 'Sham' investigation or enforcing 'rule of law' OurQuadCities.com

WEB EXTRA Jan 6 Committee: 'Sham' investigation or enforcing 'rule of law'

Thanks for checking out this web extra. We didn't have time to bring you all of your panel discussion on this week's 4 the Record. The one issue left to address: developments in the investigation into the attack on the Capitol a year ago. More subpoenas were issued this week from the House Select Committee investigating last year's invasion of the U. S. Capitol calling for them to testify in front of the committee. Rudy Giuliani is the biggest name in this group, along with two other lawyers who promoted conspiracy theories of election fraud for the former president. The committee got a win from the Supreme Court that will send hundreds of President Trump's records that could determine the extent of his knowledge or involvement in the attack. Iowa Republican Party Chair Jeff Kaufmann and Scott County Democratic Party Chair Matt Trimble share their thoughts. "This committee is a sham," said Kaufmann. "Nancy Pelosi removed Republicans from the committee .... It's a political sideshow." 'No one's above the law," Trimble said. "Especially in America .... It's about the rule of law." Hear what else these party leaders say in the video. Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home.

OurQuadCities.com WEB EXTRA: Finkenauer won't shy away from Grassley if Democratic nominee OurQuadCities.com

WEB EXTRA: Finkenauer won't shy away from Grassley if Democratic nominee

Thanks for clicking on this web extra from Jim Niedelman's conversation with U. S. Senator candidate Abby Finkenauer. One part of our conversation we didn't have time to bring you on 4 the Record was how she would take on Chuck Grassley. "He's actually the least popular he's ever been," Finkenauer said. "He's been in DC too dang long." Hear what else Finkenauer says in our video. Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home.

OurQuadCities.com Irvin entry into Illinois governor's race could change dynamic in GOP Primary OurQuadCities.com

Irvin entry into Illinois governor's race could change dynamic in GOP Primary

That quest for answers about last year's attack on the u-s capitol brings more subpoenas ... so far, subpoenas that are being defied. There are no changes in operations at the Iowa Capitol as more state lawmakers test positive for COVID-19. And .a new Republican in the race for Illinois governor might be the party's chosen one. Republican Richard Irvin made quite a splash this week when he joined the party's primary race for governor. We'll get to that this morning with Iowa Republican Party Chair Jeff Kaufmann and Scott County Democratic Party Chair Matt Trimble. "I'm excited about Mr. Irvin. Even if it's across the river, we're looking at who can carry the banner of Republicanism," Kaufmann said. "I'm focused on the 2022 midterm. All I can say is they're doing things right," Trimble said. Hear what else our panelists say when you listen to the video. And we'd like to hear from you with our question of the week: What do you think about the role big money plays in political campaigns? Let us know at 4therecord@whbf.com. Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home

OurQuadCities.com Finkenauer OK with some, not all, of Build Back Better plan OurQuadCities.com

Finkenauer OK with some, not all, of Build Back Better plan

We're back with former Iowa Congresswoman Abby Finkenauer, candidate for U. S. Senate. Gridlock in the Senate keeps a lot of legislation from being adopted. Democrats eager to pass voting rights legislation are unable to do it unless the filibuster is eliminated or at least suspended. We know two Democrats won't agree to the rule change. They are Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema. "I would reform it, I would eliminate it, whatever we've got to do to keep moving things forward," she said. "The reality is you've got these senators that just hide behind it." Hear what else Finkenauer has to say about filibusters, and more, in the video. Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home.

OurQuadCities.com Finkenauer undeterred by DC dysfunction in Senate bid OurQuadCities.com

Finkenauer undeterred by DC dysfunction in Senate bid

This year of midterm elections will have several highly contested races in our area of Iowa and Illinois - races for governor in both states, both state legislatures, in Congress, House and Senate seats. Chuck Grassley's decision to run for an eighth term in the U. S. Senate at 88 years old has four Democrats itching to take his job. They are Abby Finkenauer, Michael Franken, Glenn Hurst and Bob Krause. Let's follow the money in this senate primary with a look at the cash on hand in campaign accounts at the end of the third quarter. Fourth quarter reports aren't in yet. Krause and Franken joined the race in the fourth quarter so there's nothing to show for them. Finkenauer has close to $600,000 and Hurst is behind at $32,000. Even Finkenauer's money pales in comparison to the more than $3 million Chuck Grassley has in his coffers. We will get to know Abby Finkenauer a little bit this morning. She clearly was drawn to politics at an early age. As a teenager, she was a page for Iowa Congressman Jim Nussle. In college she was the Iowa volunteer coordinator for Joe Biden's presidential campaign in 2007. Finkenauer was elected to two terms in Iowa House of Representatives, serving Dubuque, then made the jump to Congress where she served one term, but lost her re-election bid to current Congresswoman Ashley Hinson. Abby Finkenauer, 33, brings the most prominent legislative experience of the three Democrats running for the nomination. "I saw these folks be there for decades who don't even know why they're running any more," she said. "Folks who are getting committee assignments because they've been there the longest, not because they actually know the most about that particular subject. That's why our democracy is in trouble right now." Hear what else Finkenauer has to say in the video. Local 4 News, your local election headquarters, is proud to present 4 The Record, a weekly news and public affairs program focused on the issues important to you.  It’s a program unlike any other here in the Quad Cities. Tune in each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. as Jim Niedelman brings you up to speed on what’s happening in the political arena, from Springfield, Des Moines, Washington, D.C. and right here at home.

OurQuadCities.com OurQuadCities.com

Frozen Fat Fondo Festival will return to Credit Island

Friends of Off-Road Cycling will bring back the Frozen Fat Fondo Festival at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 29, at Credit Island, Davenport. Riders will test their mettle on a circuit featuring many technical challenges, through thick lowland forest and chunky river shoreline on this three-hour endurance ride, a news release says. Riders will participate as three-person relay teams or solo on mountain bikes called fat bikes, which have 3.5" wide or greater tires. The FFFFestival is held rain or shine, snow or slime, on the shores of the Mississippi River at the newly rebuilt Credit Island Lodge. All proceeds from this event benefit FORC and will be used to purchase materials and tools to maintain and improve all nine local off-road bike trails in the Quad Cities. Fondo is short for "Gran Fondo," which is usually a challenging long-distance race-like event where participants are timed. Numerous cross-country skiing, running, and road biking Gran Fondo events are held throughout the United States annually.

OurQuadCities.com Bridge reopened after early-morning crash OurQuadCities.com

Bridge reopened after early-morning crash

A bridge in Sterling is now open after being closed due to an early-morning traffic crash. Sgt. Ryan Potthoff announced just after 4 a.m. Sunday that the 1st Avenue Bridge was closed from 2nd Street in Sterling to 2nd Street in Rock Falls. Around 6:20 a.m., it was announced the bridge had reopened to normal traffic. No further information about the crash is available at this time. Details will be provided when available. Meanwhile, a snow emergency is still in effect for the City of Sterling. This is a developing story. Stay tuned to Local 4 News, Fox 18 News and OurQuadCities.com for updates. Got a news tip? Forward it to Local 4 on Twitter or Facebook or download our app on your iPhone or Android phone. 

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Real estate transactions for Sunday, Jan. 23, 2022

Following are seller, buyer, property description and price of property. Note: price is an estimate based on revenue stamps that are bought from the county.

Saturday, January 22nd, 2022

OurQuadCities.com Billiards players give it their best shot during weekend tournament OurQuadCities.com

Billiards players give it their best shot during weekend tournament

After a year of being canceled, the American Cue Sports Alliance Midwest 8-Ball Championship is back in the Quad Cities. A total of 80 pool tables were set up in the Davenport River Center earlier this week for over 900 registered players from across the Midwest to compete — trying for their chance to win a share of the $45,000 in prize money. This weekend's tournament marks the sixth year Davenport has hosted it, but it won't be the last time. Visit Quad Cities and the tournament agreed to work together through 2024. Local 4 News stopped by the River Center Thursday, where the competition was in full swing for its second day. Those in attendance say they're just happy to be back with such a large turnout and were disappointed to see the event canceled in the past. window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7358544","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p0","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","script":"//w3.mp.lura.live/player/prod/v3/plugins/comscore/comscoreplugin.min.js","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"video":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""},"ad":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7358544%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3Dna003%26pagetype%3Dsubindex"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3MzU4NTQ0IiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NDI5MTczMDd9.RQwFJJsfmC2Gxa1VjS5j3DSjTm7g6-Qm-b0f_C99eX0","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7358544?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6Su8eZYDaUS5My5SZlinXLloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60}); "People just want to get back out and play, so it's really, really cool to get back out and do this and see all the people," said one player. "I just hope everyone stays safe and healthy. It's a good tournament." window.loadAnvato({"mcp":"LIN","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"7358692","autoplay":false,"expect_preroll":true,"pInstance":"p1","plugins":{"comscore":{"clientId":"6036439","c3":"ourquadcities.com","script":"//w3.mp.lura.live/player/prod/v3/plugins/comscore/comscoreplugin.min.js","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"video":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""},"ad":{"c3":"ourquadcities.com","ns_st_st":"whbf","ns_st_pu":"Nexstar","ns_st_ge":"News,Video","cs_ucfr":""}}},"dfp":{"adTagUrl":"https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=1x1000&iu=/5678/nx.whbf/news/local_news/landing&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vmap&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&description_url=https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/local-news/feed/&cust_params=vid%3D7358692%26pers_cid%3Dunknown%26vidcat%3D/news/local_news%26bob_ck%3D[bob_ck_val]%26d_code%3Dna003%26pagetype%3Dsubindex"},"nielsen":{"apid":"PE960F05F-339A-432F-86B1-464685BDDB37","sfcode":"dcr","type":"dcr","apn":"Anvato","environment":"production","useDerivedMetadata":true,"mapping":{"adloadtype":2,"adModel":2}},"segmentCustom":{"script":"https://segment.psg.nexstardigital.net/anvato.js","writeKey":"pHTh01LNodgBw3bclBmxxhrOBUbDktVw","pluginsLoadingTimeout":12}},"accessKey":"Rawk5AaOEXxaRCRo2zCnBckdB3Ky0dnD","token":"eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJ2aWQiOiI3MzU4NjkyIiwiaXNzIjoiUmF3azVBYU9FWHhhUkNSbzJ6Q25CY2tkQjNLeTBkbkQiLCJleHAiOjE2NDI5MTczMDd9.c_mLwgnMZcjBxm-0J5T_zf_dhbB38T68n0OgdDz_Xn0","expectPrerollTimeout":8,"nxs":{"mp4Url":"https://tkx.mp.lura.live/rest/v2/mcp/video/7358692?anvack=26qYwQV3rJ52OI2WxpUdpTDRpVdAMgG1&token=%7E6Su8eZUOb0S5My5SZViqWLloGseZvo70MQ%3D%3D","enableFloatingPlayer":true},"disableMutedAutoplay":false,"recommendations":false,"expectPreroll":true,"titleVisible":true,"pauseOnClick":true,"trackTimePeriod":60}); Donnie Daily, who was at the event on Saturday, agreed. "I think it's more relief that they actually get to go to a tournament now," said Daily. "I can't believe nobody's wearing masks, but it's kinda nice getting back together because they canceled a lot of them last year, so yeah, this works out. I don't know how long this is going to last. Who knows." The competition is free for the public to attend, and it will resume Sunday with the junior event. Learn more about the schedule here.

WQAD.com How some people in the Quad Cities are marking the 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade WQAD.com

How some people in the Quad Cities are marking the 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade

On Saturday, Jan. 22, local leaders and activists rallied in Rock Island to support a woman's right to choose.

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Man admits to placing homemade bombs in suburban Des Moines

Two detonated as planned. The third was found intact by an 8-year-old girl.

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Girls wrestling approved as sanctioned sport by Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union

The IGHSAU voted unanimously voted to sanction girls wrestling at its 11th supported spot.

OurQuadCities.com MidAmerican Energy's newly-proposed project aims to 'exceed' energy commitment OurQuadCities.com

MidAmerican Energy's newly-proposed project aims to 'exceed' energy commitment

Iowa is poised to take another step to expand clean energy. Earlier this week, MidAmerican Energy announced plans for a major renewable energy project called Wind PRIME. It would invest $3.9 billion in renewable energy projects like wind turbines. Solar farms and emerging energy technology are also part of this. MidAmerican's goal is to deliver 100% renewable energy to its customers. "In Iowa last year, we project that 88% of the energy we delivered to our customers over the year's time was through wind energy," said MidAmerican spokesperson Geoff Greenwood. "There is some solar energy that we started in the mix — but we want to make that a much greater portion of the energy that we supply to our customers — so we're projecting that, in the next few years, we're not only going to meet our 100% renewable energy commitment ... we're going to exceed it." The project still needs regulatory approval, and the company has not picked locations yet for new wind or solar farms.

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ICNA handed out free winter packages

The packets included coats, scarves, gloves, and socks.

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Kinna’s House of Love holding Multi-Cultural Love Fest

The focus of the fest is to learn about the different cultures in the QCA and how to respect them.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

8-Ball tournament brings business to the QC

About 900 competitors came to Davenport for the ACS 2022 Midwest 8-Ball Championships.

OurQuadCities.com Retired Davenport police officer will speak at human trafficking prayer service OurQuadCities.com

Retired Davenport police officer will speak at human trafficking prayer service

January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month, and a local faith-based organization is dedicated to ending the crime through prayer. Attacking Trafficking will hold its 10th annual prayer service 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 23, at St. Alban's Episcopal Church, 3510 W. Central Park Ave., Davenport. Reservations to attend the event are not required. The service will feature remarks from Hank Jacobsen, a retired officer who previously worked for the Davenport Police Department. "Mr. Jacobsen will talk about how trafficking affects our community, what other crimes are associated with it and why it matters to the public," a news release says. "He will be including information from law enforcement." Attack Trafficking will also give a brief overview of its 2022 priorities during the service, providing ways community members can engage to help end trafficking in Iowa. The organization, comprised of local faith-based groups, says it's united in its fight against all forms of human trafficking and offers help and healing for survivors. Learn more about the organization and how to get involved on the Attacking Trafficking website, Facebook page or sending an email.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Iowa Sanctions High School Girls Wrestling

The Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union Board of Directors voted unanimously to sanction girls wrestling as the organization’s 11th sport

OurQuadCities.com Snow emergency declared, parking regulations announced OurQuadCities.com

Snow emergency declared, parking regulations announced

The City of Sterling declared a snow emergency that will take effect 10 p.m. Saturday in anticipation of forecasted weather. After that time, all vehicles must be parked in accordance with the following snow emergency parking regulations: No parking on snow routes until all snow has been removed from the full width of the street.No parking in the Central Business District and in city parking lots from 1:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m.Odd and even parking restrictions will be in effect on all other city streets. People are asked to park on the odd-numbered side of the street on odd days of the month. On even days of the month, people are asked to park on the even-numbered side of the street. Odd and even days will be considered as beginning between 6 and 8 a.m. No one will be ticketed during this timeframe. Odd and even-numbered sides of the street refer to the usual residence and building address numbers. "These parking restrictions will terminate block by block after the snowfall stops and when all accumulated snow has been removed from the full width of the street, or when the snow emergency is canceled by the City," a news release says. "All other parking restrictions remain in effect. No parking will be permitted on streets where parking is restricted or prohibited." The City says cars parked in violation of the snow emergency parking regulations will be ticketed and may be towed at the owner's expense. They remind residents to be mindful once weather conditions have passed. "Please be a good neighbor and shovel your sidewalk after the plows have completed clearing the streets," a news release says. "It helps your neighbors, your postal carrier, the children who walk to school and it shows that you care about your community." For questions regarding the City of Sterling's parking regulations, contact the Sterling Police Department at 815-632-6640 or the Public Works Department at 815-632-6657.

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Logistics center will help abortion seekers get to Illinois

Several states have already imposed new restrictions on abortions that have led women from those states to seek the procedure in states such as Illinois.

WQAD.com One dead, two injured in Galesburg after early morning shooting WQAD.com

One dead, two injured in Galesburg after early morning shooting

A man was found dead and two other people were rushed to the hospital after a shooting early Saturday morning.

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State police to conduct nighttime patrols in Rock Island, Knox counties next month

Illinois State Police will be cracking down on impaired driving and occupant restraint violations in Rock Island and Knox counties next month as part of the "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" campaign. According to District 7 Commander Captain Jason Dickey, a series of Nighttime Enforcement (NITE) patrols will occur between the hours of 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. throughout the month of February in both counties. "The number of unrestrained drivers killed in traffic crashes is significantly higher at nighttime and, combined with impaired driving, means even more traffic deaths during these critical hours," a news release says. During the nighttime patrols, officers will strictly enforce violations, including: Driving under the influence (DUI)Safety belt and child restraint useSpeedingDistracted drivingAll Illinois vehicle code and criminal violations State police say alcohol and drug impairment is a factor in more than 30% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes in Illinois, with over half of all fatal crashes occurring at night. "The NITE program allows officers to work even harder at removing dangerous impaired drivers from the road and making sure everyone is buckled up," a news release says. This project is funded by the Illinois Department of Transportation.

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Woman and child dead after Macomb house fire

An infant, and later, the woman found with it, were pronounced dead after pulling them from a burning house Friday morning.