QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Thursday, November 14th, 2019

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City of Galesburg announces next fire chief

City officials announced that Fire Marshal Randy Hovind was chosen to serve as the next fire chief for the city of Galesburg.

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Michigan retailers urge people not to panic during statewide liquor shortage

State officials said the shortage is due to software issues.

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Teen with Down syndrome bags first buck

Pierce Pennaz, a 19-year-old with Down syndrome, killed his first buck on the opening weekend of deer hunting season in Minnesota.

Quad-City Times Q-C authors to sign book on bridges Saturday Quad-City Times

Q-C authors to sign book on bridges Saturday

MOLINE -- Local authors of a new book on historic Q-C bridges will sign copies on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon at Dead Poets Espresso, 1525 3rd Ave. A.

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The Market in Moline transforms for holidays, seeks donations

The 40 vendors at The Market: A Journey to Joy (inside Moline's Spotlight Theatre) are sprucing up for the holidays. There's a special benefit happening this Saturday for Spring Forward and all this month for Family Resources.

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Man claims he was unaware of rights when he allegedly confessed to Mollie Tibbetts’ murder

MONTEZUMA, Iowa (AP) — A judge won’t consider written testimony from a man who claims he was unaware of his legal rights when he allegedly confessed to killing University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts. Judge Joel Yates ruled Thursday, November 14 that he will not allow lawyers for Cristhian Bahena Rivera to submit a written affidavit from their client unless he agrees to submit to cross-examination by prosecutors. Lawyers for Rivera, who is charged with murder, say they won’t allow him to testify. Yates rejected the affidavit. Yates is considering a defense motion to suppress statements Rivera made during an interrogation in August 2018 in which he implicated himself in Tibbetts’ death. She disappeared a month earlier while running. Rivera says in the affidavit that he was unaware of certain rights and scared to invoke others.

WQAD.com ‘I ran to the school’: Parents make emotional reunion with students after school shooting WQAD.com

‘I ran to the school’: Parents make emotional reunion with students after school shooting

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. -- After learning about the deadly shooting at Saugus High School on Thursday morning, parents rushed to the Santa Clarita campus as fast as they could. Students said they started hearing shots just as classes were about to start at 7:50 a.m. One mother said she got a text from her daughter while getting ready to go to work. "My daughter Sara told me, 'Mom, I’m so scared. I love you guys so much. Please come, please come,'" she told KTLA. "And that just killed me." She said that's when she got in her car, then drove and parked near the campus. "I ran to the school, and I waited and waited," the mother said." "She was the first one to get out." Another mother held her daughter Riley as she spoke about the other students still in classrooms nearly two hours after news of the shooting surfaced. "They’re texting us that they’re hiding in closets, they’re scared to die," she said. Adam, a junior at Saugus High School, was also with his mom after the incident. "I heard a bunch of sirens, he called me, I said come right home," his mother said. "It’s nerve wracking. It’s horrible. I feel so bad for all the parents who haven’t heard from their kids. I was lucky. And there’s a lot of parents who haven’t heard from their kids at all." She said that she also has a 13-year-old daughter at Arroyo Seco Junior High. Her daughter called her to say that her school also went on lockdown. “She’s scared. She’s 13. She doesn’t know what’s going on," the mother said. She said she's glad that her kids learned what they needed to do from lockdown drills. "It’s really sad that they have to do that, but it does prepare them," she said.

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Donations needed ahead of Mr. Thanksgiving's annual Thanksgiving meal

For more than 40 years, Mr. Thanksgiving has organized a Thanksgiving day meal held at SouthPark Mall in Moline and thousands have turned out to participate.

Quad-City Times Noon update: Falling temps this afternoon Quad-City Times

Noon update: Falling temps this afternoon

Here's the afternoon forecast from the National Weather Service.

WVIK Mr. Thanksgiving Gets Ready for His 49th Dinner WVIK

Mr. Thanksgiving Gets Ready for His 49th Dinner

Mr. Thanksgiving has returned for the 49th year. Bob Vogelbaugh will host his annual community Thanksgiving dinner once again at SouthPark Mall, inviting anyone who wants to come.

WQAD.com Moline PD wins viral ‘Git Up Challenge’ benefiting Rock Island’s YWCA WQAD.com

Moline PD wins viral ‘Git Up Challenge’ benefiting Rock Island’s YWCA

MOLINE, Illinois — The City of Moline’s police department won a viral dance competition that was making the rounds in the Quad Cities. The Moline, East Moline and Rock Island Police Departments took part in the “The Git Up Challenge,” which is a dancing competition based around Blanco Brown’s line-dancing hip hop song. Each department made their own video for the challenge, which was done to benefit the Rock Island YWCA.  Community members were asked to give $1 to vote for their favorite department.  After adding up all the votes, the Moline Police Department prevailed. “The real winner of the Git Up Challenge is our community!!” said a post on the Moline Police Department’s Facebook page. “We all benefit every day from the services provided by our police departments! Thank you to our amazing community for sharing the challenge and supporting the YWCA!!” For 2020, the Moline Police Department is challenging Davenport and Bettendorf to go head-to-head against them in the challenge.

Quad-City Times Zac Brown Band to play TaxSlayer Center in Moline Feb. 28 Quad-City Times

Zac Brown Band to play TaxSlayer Center in Moline Feb. 28

MOLINE — The new spring 2020 tour of the Grammy-winning Zac Brown Band will start in Moline on Feb. 28, at the TaxSlayer Center, as an extension of their successful summer 2019 "The Owl Tour."

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Teacher accused of threatening to shoot students in Wash.

Pierce County, Wash. deputies said Hillend-Jones made threats about shooting students while off campus during a conversation with adults.

Quad-City Times Writer of environmental classic will speak at Nahant Marsh fundraiser Quad-City Times

Writer of environmental classic will speak at Nahant Marsh fundraiser

Environmental writer Doug Peacock will speak Feb. 29 at the 2nd annual Oberholtzer Awards at The Bend Event Center, East Moline. The event is a fundraiser for Nahant Marsh Education Center, Davenport, and recognizes people who have made significant contributions…

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At least 6 hurt in Southern California high school shooting

The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department has reported a shooting at Saugus High School Thursday morning.

Quad-City Times No. 49 a go for Thanksgiving dinner Quad-City Times

No. 49 a go for Thanksgiving dinner

MOLINE — Bob Vogelbaugh is playing hurt, but pending surgery will not keep Mr. Thanksgiving and his 49th holiday gathering from its appointed rounds.

Quad-City Times Feds: Truck drivers can stay on the road longer to supply propane Quad-City Times

Feds: Truck drivers can stay on the road longer to supply propane

Federal action has been taken to allow commercial truck drivers to drive longer periods of time to address propane needs for area users and farmers seeking to dry their crop.

Quad-City Times Propane shortage prompts regional emergency declaration Quad-City Times

Propane shortage prompts regional emergency declaration

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has granted a Regional Emergency Declaration to help keep homes warm, and dry wet grain.

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Couple demands answers after warranty company leaves them without heat

DAVENPORT, Iowa – Anna and Henry Holmes say they’re freezing as they go into their seventh day without a furnace at their home. When the couple bought the house earlier this year, they said they wanted to make sure they would be covered if a major appliance were to break. So, they bought a one-year warranty from American Home Shield. Now, they say that company has no sense of urgency in getting their heat turned back on. “I’m just getting so frustrated because every time we talk to them on the phone we get a run-around,” Anna Holmes, one of the homeowners said. Anna says she and her husband, Henry, reported their broken furnace last Friday, Nov. 8. American Home Shield sent a contractor to check out the furnace, but the Holmes’ say that meeting didn’t end well. “We probably wouldn’t be able to get it fixed because the parts wouldn’t be available because its such an old heating system,” Anna said the contractor told her. A second contractor visited the house on Monday Nov., 11, as snow and record-cold temperatures set into the Davenport area. “Since then I’ve had no way of plugging in more than two space heaters and I am running my oven for heat,” Anna said. With no easy fix in sight, they’re getting worried about their health. American Home Shield, a company that has been around for 48 years and has a “B” rating from the Better Business Bureau (BBB), did not return our request for comment on Nov. 13. The Holmes’ say representatives told them that a next step cannot be made in the repair process until a “diagnosis” was given by a contractor. “Evidently the guy who came out on Monday is not getting his paperwork done and we’re sitting here in the cold,” Anna said. Now, the couple has spent around $500 on a warranty to fix their broken furnace but have not seen any repairs. “I just wonder how long its going to be before we get a furnace or some type of heat in this house,” said Anna. A couple stuck waiting for answers and for heat.

WQAD.com QC Veterans Outreach Center opens new weekly grocery store for vets WQAD.com

QC Veterans Outreach Center opens new weekly grocery store for vets

DAVENPORT, Iowa -- Veterans will now have a weekly resource for food, toiletries and more at the Quad City Veterans Outreach Center. It's called the Veteran's Marketplace, which will open every Wednesday from 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. in Davenport. The program is replacing the center's previous monthly food basket. The center's founder, Lola VanDeWalle says the marketplace will be able to give veterans up to 15 times more food than before. "It's a great need," VanDeWalle says. "It's very exciting to reach more and more veterans, and say 'Thank you' to them." The marketplace looks like a small grocery, and will allow the center to have veterans line up inside, instead of outside in years past. That means more people, who couldn't stand in line because of the weather or health issues before, will now be able to access the grocery store. The marketplace isn't just about the free groceries -- it's also about the camaraderie. "It's really fun to be around fellow veterans," army veteran Dennis Hackbarth says. "I may not have been in (the war) they were, but like I said, we all have stories, and we can collide and come together with those stories." Both Hackbarth and VanDeWalle say many veterans need this assistance to take care of themselves and their families. "When you're on a fixed income, it's very hard to get by on what we get," Hackbarth says. "It makes it hard to get through the whole month, so this helps out a lot." VanDeWalle says that it could be anyone that needs help from a center like this, and she calls it a "hand up," not a "hand out." "A lot of people ask me if we just take care of the homeless veterans," she says. "No, (it could be) your next door neighbor, maybe grandparents raising their grandkids when they didn't know they would have to before. It may be loss of a job, or health." The marketplace is open to all veterans who are members of the outreach center. The center does run on donations, and is always open to donations from the public.

WQAD.com 38-year-old man awarded $2 million after botched circumcision at Iowa Clinic WQAD.com

38-year-old man awarded $2 million after botched circumcision at Iowa Clinic

DES MOINES, Iowa - In the last several months, two lawsuits against Iowa Clinic doctors have resulted in nearly $15 million payouts, with the latest coming after a man’s unwanted vasectomy. In December of 2015 Zaw Zaw, a 38 year old Burmese man, was sent to the Iowa clinic with a referral letter for circumcision.  The letter was also faxed. "In four places on the referral form it said circumcision, circumcision, circumcision, circumcision," said Zaw Zaw's attorney Marc Harding. The letter, Harding says, was to help with Zaw Zaw`s trouble speaking English but he signed more forms at the clinic. "The interpreter filled out intake forms and said 'We filled out that it was to cut the skin.  That particular document ended up being shredded," Harding told WHO. In January of 2016 instead of circumcision, Dr. Kevin Birusingh performed a vasectomy on Zaw Zaw. Harding said, "Zaw Zaw never understood what they were trying to get across and that was their duty and their job to get that across." Harding says they tried to come to an agreement with the Iowa Clinic before trial.  "Yeah they blamed him.  They said he should`ve known we were wrong in the way we were doing it and pointing the finger at him the whole way through," said Harding. Wednesday a jury made a $2 million dollar verdict saying Dr. Birusingh shouldered 70% of the blame and Zaw Zaw 30% blame.  "Dr. Bireusingh, he was the professional, he was the one that should have made sure because he was the one cutting on the body," Harding said. The Iowa Clinic responded to Wednesday`s verdict saying "We are grateful for the jury`s hard work and are pleased that no fault in this matter was assigned to the Iowa Clinic. It is important to note, the physician involved in this case has not been on staff with the clinic for more than a year." Last April, a jury awarded over $12 million  to a Panora man who was wrongly diagnosed with prostate cancer by the Iowa Clinic.  The intense surgery left him with nerve damage that negatively impacted his marriage. Harding sees a clear pattern.  "Paperwork was not handled properly, I think there`s a lot of similarities." Zaw Zaw has chosen to go to another clinic for his circumcision and to reverse the vasectomy. Dr. Birusingh is now employed as a urologist at Broadlawns.

WVIK Good Morning from WVIK News for Thursday, November 14, 2019 WVIK

Good Morning from WVIK News for Thursday, November 14, 2019

Quad-City Times Rick's Six: 5 teens escape detention center, riverfront trail closes for bridge work, and a warming trend Quad-City Times

Rick's Six: 5 teens escape detention center, riverfront trail closes for bridge work, and a warming trend

A good Thursday to all. Temperatures are inching upward. After record low temperatures earlier this week, the warming trend is welcome news for many of us. Here are the weather details from the National Weather Service.

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November Off To Second Coldest Start

As you probably could have guessed November 2019 is cold and snowy thus far.

Wednesday, November 13th, 2019

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TV6 INVESTIGATES: Bettendorf family escapes fire, Fire Marshals offers safety tips

TV6 Investigates gives you tips for fire prevention and safety during the colder months.

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QC Veteran Outreach Center opens new marketplace for veterans

Veterans can fill up a grocery basket full of food and toiletries once a month on Wednesdays.

WQAD.com News 8 Exclusive: Davenport West assault victim speaks out after alleged attacker is expelled WQAD.com

News 8 Exclusive: Davenport West assault victim speaks out after alleged attacker is expelled

DAVENPORT, IOWA  --  A Davenport West High School student charged with assaulting another student in the cafeteria is now expelled. The student is expelled until at least the fall of 2022 following the Nov. 4 attack on a fellow Davenport West High School student later identified as Charlie Macaluso. Charlie spoke with News 8's Lauren Jackson in an exclusive interview and says he doesn't think the other student should have been expelled. "I don't know what to think of the fact that he got expelled," Charlie said. "In my mind, it is a bit far. I would have been fine." Charli's mother, Theresa Wallenhorst, said they were not notified by the school or the board of the student's expulsion. Charlie had to have brain surgery after the attack. He now has 46 staples in his head, but they will be removed before he returns to school on Monday. "I'm not so nervous to go back," Charlie said. Charlie says the the attack was the result of a picture that Charlie took of the other student for a school project. He says they were friends. "We were cool enough for him to let me take a photo," Charlie said. "We were some what close before this. All I really care that people know is that I had no intent to hurt him. I want people to know that I wasn't trying to harm him." "It was posted for 10 to 15 minuets and he told me to take it down and I did and I apologize," Charlie said. But, the photo circulated the school, and the expelled student's parents say he was being bullied for the photo. "Yeah, I took the photo and yeah it was out of range on my part, but I didn't throw any context on it," Charlie said. "I didn't bully him with the photo myself." Charlie says he didn't know the cafeteria attack was going to happen and that no one warned him. "I didn't know he was stressed," Charlie said. "No one had told me. I was blindsided. I thought they were my friends and they smiled while they filmed it." Charlie says he has not spoken to any of the students who recorded the attack. But, says he would like to talk to the expelled student. "If it would help," Charlie said. "If it would clear things up on both of our parts and it would be positive for both of us. I would love to sit down and try to talk to him. I do feel kind of bad for him." Charlie and his family are meeting with the school on Friday, November 15th, 2019 to discuss a plan for his return to school. The expelled student is facing charges of aggravated assault and willful injury.

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DEVELOPING: Five juveniles escape from Galesburg facility

Five juveniles escaped from the Knox County Mary Davis Home in Galesburg, Ill. facility Wednesday evening.

WQAD.com Investigation reported at Mary Davis Home in Galesburg WQAD.com

Investigation reported at Mary Davis Home in Galesburg

GALESBURG, Illinois — A police presence was on scene at the Mary Davis Home. Multiple police squad cars were spotted in the parking lot of the Juvenile Detention Center on Wednesday evening, November 13.  The Mary Davis Home is located at the corner of East 5th Street and Locust Street. A spokesperson with Knox County Public Safety confirmed there was an ongoing investigation. No other information was immediately available.

Quad-City Times Iowa leaders: Tell the EPA to protect ethanol standards and Iowa jobs Quad-City Times

Iowa leaders: Tell the EPA to protect ethanol standards and Iowa jobs

Everyday citizens can voice their concerns to the EPA about the contested Renewable Fuel Standard by November 29.

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Davenport students learn about having purpose and setting goals

There’s an effort to help local students stay on the path of graduating high school.

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Local business reacts to bill making Daylight Saving Time permanent

Soon when you cross the Mississippi River, you may be in a different time zone when you get to the other side. It could happen under a bill overwhelmingly passed by the Illinois Senate which would have Illinois staying on daylight saving time year-round.

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Illinois housing authority residents unable to light up in 2020 once pot’s legal

  MOLINE, Illinois – The legalization of marijuana in Illinois in 2020 is putting federally funded public housing authorities in a bind.  Currently, it’s against federal and state law to smoke cannabis. But even though marijuana will be legal in the state Jan. 1, people living in local public housing may not be able to light up. Right now, at Spring Valley public housing complex, a place for low income residents, people can’t smoke cigarettes inside a unit and must smoke outside 25 feet away.  But come Jan. 1, even though marijuana will be legal in Illinois, anyone who lives in public housing won’t be able to smoke the drug inside or out. “It could be a mess, could be a real mess,” says John Afound, Moline Public Housing Authority President. Afoun says when marijuana becomes legal in Illinois next year it won’t be allowed in resident homes since public housing is federally funded and they must follow federal rules. “The conflict between federal and state law is at play here,” Afoun says. “Federal government doesn’t have it legal so we’re in a Catch 22 because there are some of us who need the medical, “says Spring Valley resident, Debra Crocker. “I have epilepsy, so it would help me quite a bit if I could use it and I just got over breast cancer so that would help,” says Gloria Anderson, another Spring Valley resident. Now, the new state law is forcing housing authorities to decide a new rule. “The federal government says that we can adopt a policy that either evicts them or control the use of it,” Afoun explains. That’s the choice the local housing board has to make for current residents who face eviction now if they’re caught with cannabis, but future residents have to follow a different rule. “Anyone coming in new – who if there’s an indication that they smoke or have possession – then they would not be allowed,” Afoun says. But Afoun says with state marijuana records being expunged starting Jan. 1, those who possessed 30 grams or less in the past may be able to get by. “If there’s no evidence there’s obviously nothing we can do about that,” comments Afoun. “What we don’t want to do is violate anyone’s right … but our obligation is to comply with the rules.” If the housing board does decide to evict residents they won’t be evicted right away, Afoun says there will be some warnings put in place first. The Moline Housing Board will discuss what they will put in place at their meeting Monday.  They have until the end of the year to make the decision.

WQAD.com Bettendorf couple visits Nashville during CMA Award time WQAD.com

Bettendorf couple visits Nashville during CMA Award time

NASHVILLE, Tennessee -- The Country Music Association Awards bring spectators and fans from all over the world - even people from the Quad Cities. Loyd and Sara Ihrig came all the way to Nashville from Bettendorf, Iowa for the big show. "We toured the Grand Old Opry and the area we were at, there was three or four bars who had live music all night long," remembers Loyd. "So we were hanging out listening to music." Sara echoed their love for music, saying "it's a fun place to be." Related: What 'making it' really means to musicians You can catch the CMA Awards on WQAD News 8 starting at 7 p.m., Wednesday, November 13.

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Chicago records second cold-related death of season

Officials say the death of an 80-year-old Chicago man whose body was found on the floor of the garage is the second cold-related death of the season.

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Officer says Miranda failure during Rivera interrogation was honest mistake

Rivera’s lawyers have asked a judge to suppress Rivera’s alleged confession, in part due to the incomplete Miranda warning.

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Iowa man pleads guilty to making bomb threats against President Trump

An Iowa man has pleaded guilty to threatening to kill President Donald Trump with homemade bombs.

WQAD.com An economic boon for Rock Island business owners with ideas WQAD.com

An economic boon for Rock Island business owners with ideas

ROCK ISLAND- Quad City business owners had the chance to meet with potential investors today. People developing a business or project had 15-minutes to pitch their ideas during an event at the Holiday Inn in Rock Island. They say the goal was to secure funding to help finish their projects. The businesses that were pitched came from a variety of industries, including healthcare and manufacturing.

WQAD.com Hamilton Elementary students awarded for kindness WQAD.com

Hamilton Elementary students awarded for kindness

MOLINE, Illinois- Third graders at Hamilton Elementary were awarded for completing this year's 30-day kindness challenge. Our chief meteorologist James Zahara presented the 500-dollar cheque to the class awarded by the IRA Credit Union. Students had some requirements like not saying anything negative about someone else or praising other students for a job well done. Mrs. Moore says kindness is more important now than ever. The class plans on spending the money on new chairs and rugs for storytime.

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Agent: Mollie Tibbetts would have been found without confession

Police believe the body of University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts would have eventually been discovered, even if the suspect in her killing hadn’t led police there.

Quad-City Times New youth songwriters roundtable launches at RME Quad-City Times

New youth songwriters roundtable launches at RME

A new free program at River Music Experience, Davenport, starts Saturday with a monthly roundtable for songwriters younger than 18.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Orion man sues Cambridge for $50K over fall on ice

CAMBRIDGE – An Orion man has filed suit against the village of Cambridge seeking $50,000 or more in compensation for a fall he suffered in November of 2018 on village property.

Quad-City Times Davenport's Cru gets Harry Potter-style makeover Nov. 23 Quad-City Times

Davenport's Cru gets Harry Potter-style makeover Nov. 23

DAVENPORT — Grab your broom (or vehicle of choice) and transport yourself into the magical world of Harry Potter next Saturday as Cru morphs into the “Leaky Cauldron,” a prominent wizarding pub and inn featured in the books and films.

WQAD.com Moline high kicking off annual Share Joys Fundraiser with donut eating contest WQAD.com

Moline high kicking off annual Share Joys Fundraiser with donut eating contest

MOLINE, Illinois- This year the Moline High School Share Joys campaign will take place December 9 through 13. The school says this year’s events will start with a donut eating contest, sponsored by Donut Delight, on Wednesday, December 4, at 7:00 a.m. in the East Gym at Moline High School. Last year, Moline High School students and staff, together with the community, raised almost $47,000 to clothe 314 children who needed assistance. Contributions of any amount are currently being accepted for the 2019 Share Joys campaign. Every dollar that is contributed will go directly toward helping make this holiday season happier for Moline School District children. Checks can be made payable to Moline High School Share Joys, and can be sent to Moline High School, 3600 Avenue of the Cities, Moline, IL 61265 or dropped off in person at the high school bookstore. For further information, contact Lisa Welvaert at 309-743-8766 or David Lindstrom at 309-743-8930.

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Texas lawmakers push to regulate the vaping industry

Pediatricians say there is a vaping crisis nationwide. Texas lawmakers in Washington, D.C. are doing something about it.

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Volunteers needed for live nativity during Fulton Christmas Walk

The town will provide costumes and props for 30 minute shifts during its Christmas Walk on Saturday, Dec. 7th.

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State auditor looking into the sale of the former Lincoln School in Davenport

The school, located on Pershing and 7th in the central city has been closed for several years.

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Bus driver helps young kids wandering in 18-degree weather without coats

A bus driver came to the rescue of two children found wandering in the snow and frigid cold.

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Clinton man sentenced to 10+ years for child pornography

The investigation revealed to officials that Budde had chat sessions with young boys where officials say he pretended to be a 15-year-old virgin.

WVIK UnityPoint and Sanford Call Off Merger WVIK

UnityPoint and Sanford Call Off Merger

UnityPoint Health and South Dakota-based Sanford Health have called off plans to merge. In June, the two regional health care systems announced plans to combine, and create one of the largest non-profit health care systems in the country.

WQAD.com Iowa man pleads guilty to making bomb threats against Trump WQAD.com

Iowa man pleads guilty to making bomb threats against Trump

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (AP) — An Iowa man has pleaded guilty to threatening to kill President Donald Trump with homemade bombs. The Gazette reports that 25-year-old Christian Delatorre, of Dubuque, entered the plea Tuesday, November 12 in U.S. District Court in Cedar Rapids. The charge: willfully threatening to take the life of and inflict serious harm upon the president. His sentencing date hasn’t been set yet. A proposed plea agreement says a Secret Service agent interviewed Delatorre on April 29 at a Dubuque hospital where he was being treated for psychiatric problems. A psychiatric nurse practitioner at Mercy Hospital reported that Delatorre had been making threats about assassinating Trump. The agent reports in the document that Delatorre said he was angered when Trump mocked people and talked about sending immigrants back to their home countries. The document says Delatorre’s plans included attaching bombs to drones he’d fly over and detonate at the White House. The document also says Delatorre intended to undertake a suicide mission if his other plans didn’t work.

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Police ask for help finding missing woman out of Fort Madison, Iowa

If you have any information about her you're asked to call 319-372-2525 option 1 to speak to the dispatcher.

WVIK QC Vaping Resource Guide WVIK

QC Vaping Resource Guide

Health authorities in the Quad Cities are trying to spread the word about the dangers of vaping. The Tobacco Free QC coalition has published a resource guide that's available to schools, parents, or anyone might consider vaping.

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Bike Trail to be closed partially in Bettendorf; expected to last one month

The portion that will be closed will be between 12th Street and George Thuenen Drive, by Isle Casino & Hotel.

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First-ever James W. Victor scholarship to be awarded in 2020

Officials with the Quad Cities Community Foundation have announced 75 scholarships that total more than $550,000.

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Illinois Senate passes bill to make daylight saving time permanent

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – The Illinois Senate has approved legislation to make daylight saving time permanent in Illinois. When daylight saving time is in effect, the sun rises and sets one hour later than it normally would. According to Fox2now, Seniors in a civics class came up with the idea and presented their research before a Senate committee in Springfield. Time is regulated by federal law under the Uniform Time Act of 1966. One of two scenarios must take place in order for daylight saving time to become the permanent standard if SB 533 is passed into law: Federal legislation must be passed to exempt Illinois from the Uniform Time Act of 1966 in a way similar to Arizona and Hawaii. Federal legislation must be passed to repeal or amend the Uniform Time Act of 1966 to make daylight saving time the year-round standard nationwide. More than 35 states introduced legislation in 2019 to do away with seasonal time changes by eliminating or standardizing daylight saving time. However making the change isn’t so simple, for example, people living in other states still on standard time will experience difficulty when traveling to states on different times. Can you imagine the confusion just the Quad Cities would experience with half in Iowa and Half in Illinois? According to AP news, here’s what science has to say about a twice-yearly ritual affecting nearly 2 billion people worldwide. SLEEP EFFECTS Time changes mess with sleep schedules, a potential problem when so many people are already sleep-deprived, says Dr. Phyllis Zee, a sleep researcher at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. About 1 in 3 U.S. adults sleep less than the recommended seven-plus hours nightly, and more than half of U.S. teens don’t get the recommended eight-plus hours on weeknights. One U.S. study found that in the week following the spring switch to daylight saving time, teens slept about 2½ hours less than the previous week. Many people never catch up during the subsequent six months. Research suggests that chronic sleep deprivation can increase levels of stress hormones that boost heart rate and blood pressure, and of chemicals that trigger inflammation. HEART PROBLEMS It has also been shown that blood tends to clot more quickly in the morning. These changes underlie evidence that heart attacks are more common in general in the morning, and may explain studies showing that rates increase slightly on Mondays after clocks are moved forward in the spring, when people typically rise an hour earlier than normal. That increased risk associated with the time change is mainly in people already vulnerable because of existing heart disease, said Barry Franklin, director of preventive cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation at Beaumont Health hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan. Studies suggest that these people return to their baseline risk after the autumn time change. CAR CRASHES Numerous studies have linked the start of daylight saving time in the spring with a brief spike in car accidents, and with poor performance on tests of alertness, both likely due to sleep loss. The research includes a German study published this year that found an increase in traffic fatalities in the week after the start of daylight saving time, but no such increase in the fall. Other studies on how returning to standard time in the fall might impact car crashes have had conflicting results. OUR INTERNAL CLOCKS Circadian biologists believe ill health effects from daylight saving time result from a mismatch among the sun “clock,” our social clockwork and school schedules — and the body’s internal 24-hour body clock. Ticking away at the molecular level, the biological clock is entrained — or set — by exposure to sunlight and darkness. It regulates bodily functions such as metabolism, blood pressure and hormones that promote sleep and alertness. Disruptions to the body clock have been linked with obesity, depression, diabetes, heart problems, and other conditions. Circadian biologists say these disruptions include tinkering with standard time by moving the clock ahead one hour in the spring. A mismatch of one hour daily is enough for ill effects, especially if it lasts for several months, according to Till Roenneberg, a circadian rhythm specialist at Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, Germany. PRESSURE TO CHANGE In the U.S., daylight saving time runs from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November. It was first established 100 years ago to save energy. Modern-day research has found little or no such cost savings. Federal law allows states to remain on standard time year-round but only Hawaii and most of Arizona have chosen to. Proposed legislation in several states would have them join suit — or switch to year-round daylight saving time, which would require congressional approval. Roenneberg and Northwestern’s Zee are co-authors of a recent position statement advocating returning to standard time for good, written for the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms. “If we want to improve human health, we should not fight against our body clock, and therefore we should abandon daylight saving time,” the statement says.

WVIK Davenport Task Force Resumes Meeting WVIK

Davenport Task Force Resumes Meeting

Davenport is working on plans for a "world class playground" on the riverfront. That's how a member of a special task force describes what will happen at Main Street Landing.

WVIK Ia. Auditor Looks at Lincoln School Sale WVIK

Ia. Auditor Looks at Lincoln School Sale

The Iowa State Auditor is going to look into the recent sale of a former school in Davenport. Wednesday, Rob Sand confirmed his office has been contacted about the Lincoln School and the board of education's decision to sell it for $30,000, even though there were several much higher offers.

Quad-City Times First-annual Fall Feast will feed and entertain Quad-Cities' most vulnerable Quad-City Times

First-annual Fall Feast will feed and entertain Quad-Cities' most vulnerable

DAVENPORT — Street Friends of the Quad Cities is hosting its first Fall Dinner Feast Sunday for Quad-Citians enduring poverty and homelessness.

Quad-City Times Passionate video gamer 'The Completionist' comes to Rust Belt Nov. 19 Quad-City Times

Passionate video gamer 'The Completionist' comes to Rust Belt Nov. 19

Jirard Khalil, a 31-year-old Californian known as "The Completionist," gets to play video games for a living. He'll talk at The Rust Belt in East Moline on Nov. 19.

WQAD.com Local inventor’s app takes target practice to the next level WQAD.com

Local inventor’s app takes target practice to the next level

LONG GROVE, Iowa -- A local inventor has created a product that's taking target practice to the next level. Tyler Brockel invented a program called A.I.M.S.S., which stands for Attachable Interactive Modular Shooting System. Brockel went through training for the Army National Guard using high tech interactive targets.  So going back to traditional paper targets was getting stale for this sharp shooter. That's when he decided to develop A.I.M.S.S. The device pops up a small target attachment.  When the target goes up, you shoot.  The movement patterns are controlled by an app that also tracks your accuracy. "It really ups the realism, the intensity and therefore the entertainment," said Brockel. The Army veteran first got a patent for the idea and then went through a program called "Adventure School" at the University of Iowa.  The program is designed for entrepreneurs and that's where he linked up with investors. "We went out (and) hired a professional engineering firm who has cranked out three prototypes for us," he explained. During the trial phase of the product, Brockel is making some last minute adjustments before it's launched to the market.  He said they hope to launch the product by summer of 2020.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Traffic slow-moving after truck's load overturns on I-74 in Moline

This is heading southbound on I-74 right before the John Deere on and off-ramps.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Noon update: A blustery afternoon

Here's the afternoon forecast from the National Weather Service.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Firefighter dies saving baby, fellow firefighters in house fire

The fire department wrote on its Facebook page that "It is an extremely difficult day."

Quad-City Times REVIEW: Circa 21's 'Elf' a sterling, dazzling, joy-filled production Quad-City Times

REVIEW: Circa 21's 'Elf' a sterling, dazzling, joy-filled production

ROCK ISLAND — The holiday season is bearing down on us with the speed of a Canadian Clipper, and one of the best “sparklyjollytwinkleyjingley” places to get into the spirit of things is at Circa '21's current sterling silver-bell production…

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Vehicle damaged after shots fired incident in Davenport Tuesday evening

Police say on Tuesday, Nov. 12, at approximately 11:15 p.m., they were called to the 1600 West 7th Street.

Quad-City Times UnityPoint Health, Sanford Health merger talks end Quad-City Times

UnityPoint Health, Sanford Health merger talks end

UnityPoint Health and South Dakota-based Sanford Health's merger talks have ended.

WQAD.com Cat put in ‘solitary confinement’ for freeing other cats from a shelter, and the internet loves him WQAD.com

Cat put in ‘solitary confinement’ for freeing other cats from a shelter, and the internet loves him

Quilty the cat, welcome to the resistance. This wily 6-year-old rescue cat has become the newest darling of the internet thanks to his mutinous attempts to free himself and the rest of his cat brethren from the cushy confines of the Friends for Life Animal Shelter in Houston, Texas. A set of very angry photos of Quilty serving time for his crimes have caught fire online, an important reminder that cats are lawless creatures who can and will betray us the moment they feel it necessary. “Quilty can be a little difficult,” said Jennifer Hopkins, the communications lead at Friends for Life. For the last few months, Quilty has been a resident of the shelter’s cat room. Hopkins says that after he arrived, the door to the room kept mysteriously opening. “We would come in in the morning and have to collect all 15 of the cats who had had a blast during the night,” she told CNN. A review of security footage showed the culprit was Quilty, who would jump up and pull the handle down on the door. Three times, he managed to Houdini himself and the dozen or so other senior cats to freedom — or, at least, another room. Eventually, the shelter’s workers had to put him in “solitary confinement” in the building’s lobby while they Quilty-proofed the premises. This was its own mistake. Pictures of the unjust confinement won the little insurgent thousands of fans on Facebook. It may be his resemblance to Smudge, the cat grimacing over a plate of salad that has become a well-worn meme. Feline malcontent, after all, is an eternal spring of humor. Whatever the reason, people are now clamoring to adopt the cat that, may we remind you, can open doors and is absolutely not sorry about it. In fact, according to Hopkins, Quilty’s nickname at the shelter is “spicy a-hole.” You can draw your own conclusions as to why. Despite it all, Quilty holds a special spot at the rescue. He was born in 2012 and, like the rest of his litter, was named after a character from the Vladimir Nobokov novel “Lolita.” And, like his literary source material, the cat would prove to be problematic. Hopkins says he was almost immediately adopted to a loving household, but a few months ago his owner needed to move and couldn’t bring Quilty with her. Instead, he ended up back at Friends for Life. “We have a lifetime commitment for all of our animals to make sure they’re safe. We spend a lot of time and effort on them,” Hopkins said. “After all, we get the weird ones,” she added. The shelter has embraced Quilty’s sudden fame on its Facebook page with hashtags like #FreeQuilty and #QuiltyNotGuilty. Luckily, most people love weird cats, so Quilty has already been matched with a potential adoptive family and is awaiting next steps so he can move in to his new forever home. And, hopefully, not try to break out of it.

Quad-City Times REVIEW: Fans of 'The Shining' will take a shine to its sequel 'Doctor Sleep' Quad-City Times

REVIEW: Fans of 'The Shining' will take a shine to its sequel 'Doctor Sleep'

Redrum.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Crafty shelter cat releases kitty comrades, getting ‘in trouble’ and famous on social media

Move over, Smudge: A rescue cat named Quilty has become the newest darling of the internet, It’s all thanks to some mutinous attempts to free himself and other cats at Friends for life Animal Shelter.