QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Sunday, March 24th, 2019

WQAD.com A few more showers to dodge tonight…  More active weather later next week WQAD.com

A few more showers to dodge tonight… More active weather later next week

Flood warnings continue along several area rivers including the Mississippi and Rock. Crests are occurring now and will continue this week. Be prepared for road closures and detours in these areas.  Second crest still on track for parts of the Mississippi River by the Sunday-Monday time period. For more information on river levels go to https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=DVN Not quite done with the raindrops yet!  Expect a few more scattered showers this evening hours before the passage of a cold front drys out the rest of the night.  We’ll keep it cloudy for the rest of the night with lows dipping around 30 degrees. The passage of this front will lead to a brighter but chiller day with highs not getting out of the 40s.  Have that light jacket as a northeast breeze will put a bit of a chill from time to time. This cool down will be short lived though as high temperatures will bounce back into the lower 50s under more sun on Tuesday. Warmer winds will then blow in for the rest of the work week sending temperatures around 60 degrees during this periods for daytime highs. However, this will also lead to our next round of showers along with a few thunderstorms.   The better coverage appears to take place Thursday night into Friday before chilly 40s return the following weekend. Chief meteorologist James Zahara Download the News 8 Weather App — for iOS, click here and for Android, click here Download the free News 8 App — for iOS, click here and for Android, click here

WVIK New Americans Welcomed WVIK

New Americans Welcomed

Waving small flags, and with their proud families looking on, 44 people have become US citizens.

WQAD.com New bill will create hotline for Illinois students to report bullying WQAD.com

New bill will create hotline for Illinois students to report bullying

SPRINGFIELD- A new bill will help Illinois students anonymously report bullying. State Rep. John Cabello, R-Manchester Park, is the driving force behind a bill that will allow students under 18 to use a toll-free hotline to report harassment, according to IL News. A hotline already exists. The Department of Children and Family Services operates a hotline for reporting child abuse or neglect. “There should be no cost involved, at least to the state,” Cabello said. “Everything is already there. It’s just another way of trying to make sure we get these kids the help they need.” When called, the operator will give the caller information on how to handle their situation. The next step is to notify school officials about the details of the call. In severe cases where the bullying involves criminal action the police will become involved. Locally, a recent Facebook post by a Moline High School student created buzz about students’ ability to report bullying. According to the post, students have been subjected to racial slurs and other forms of bullying. The post says no action was taken by the school after reports were made, but when the bullied student retaliated they were sent to the office. Moline High School could not be reached for comments. Cabello says his idea was inspired by similar accounts from across his region. “What we’re trying to do is give the kids going through this another avenue of trying to make sure it stops.”

OurQuadCities.com Sports gambling proposals emerge in statehouse OurQuadCities.com

Sports gambling proposals emerge in statehouse

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WCIA) -- State Representative Michael Zalewski (D-Riverside) joined Capitol Connection to explain his plan to legalize sports gambling in Illinois. 

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Cash Course: Exploring the early retirement movement

A new movement has grown more popular across the country, and it's not hard to see why. More people are seeking early retirement to obtain financial independence.

OurQuadCities.com Democrats divided over legal marijuana effort OurQuadCities.com

Democrats divided over legal marijuana effort

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WCIA) -- State Representatives Marty Moylan (D-Des Plaines) and Bob Morgan (D-Deerfield) join Capitol Connection moderator Mark Maxwell to debate the pros and cons of legalizing recreational marijuana for adult use in Illinois. 

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Area farmers worried about plant season after wet weather

Area farmers are hoping the wet weather goes away soon, for the sake of their crops.

Quad-City Times Maquoketa addresses housing shortage, infrastructure needs Quad-City Times

Maquoketa addresses housing shortage, infrastructure needs

Thanks to grants and private investment, Maquoketa has made progress on tackling deteriorating streets and buildings, plus a housing and workforce shortage.

Quad-City Times Biz Bytes: Minority-owned small businesses can win grant for equipment Quad-City Times

Biz Bytes: Minority-owned small businesses can win grant for equipment

Minority-owned small businesses in the Quad-Cities can now apply for a grant to purchase or repair equipment.

Quad-City Times Historic courthouse demolished, and the public cheered: the story of the second Scott County courthouse Quad-City Times

Historic courthouse demolished, and the public cheered: the story of the second Scott County courthouse

The courthouse was extravagant: limestone imported from Indiana, floors tiled by English craftsmen, a grand dome over a central rotunda, an elaborate facade in the Beaux Arts style.

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Someone shot in Gulfport, Illinois

The Henderson County Sheriff's office has confirmed a shooting in Gulfport, Illinois.

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Woman shot in Gulfport, Illinois

The Henderson County Sheriff's office has confirmed a shooting in Gulfport, Illinois.

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Mueller report: Congress, public await key findings in 2-year Russia probe

Mueller will be issuing no more indictments, meaning questions will swirl about the many elements of the investigation that did not result in criminal charges.

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Deputy Iowa labor commissioner leaving amid changes, turmoil

Iowa's deputy labor commissioner says she is retiring, the latest shakeup after months of turmoil at the state agency that protects workers.

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Iowa man accused of fatally shooting adult son

59-year-old Daniel Niebuhr of Fairbank was charged Friday in the death of 36-year-old Brock Niebuhr of Dike.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Nahant Marsh hosts eco-egg hunt

A spring celebration and eco-egg hunt aimed at children 3-12 years old will be Saturday, April 13, at Nahant Marsh Education Center, 4220 Wapello Ave., Davenport. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Speakers discuss ethanol's role in climate crisis

A discussion titled "Corn, Climate and Conservation: Iowa's Clean Energy Forum" will begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, at the Davenport Public Library-Main Branch, 321 Main St.

Quad-City Times Coin show is April 7 Quad-City Times

Coin show is April 7

The Quad-City Coin Club's annual spring show will be Sunday, April 7, at the Camden Center, 2701 1st St. E., Milan, with 80 tables offering U.S. coins, foreign coins, paper money, gold, silver and coin supplies.

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019

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Davenport Police holds workshop to recruit new officers

The nationwide police shortage is being felt in Davenport.

OurQuadCities.com Armed robbery at Bettendorf credit union, suspect on the run OurQuadCities.com

Armed robbery at Bettendorf credit union, suspect on the run

Police are looking for a man suspected in an armed robbery at a Bettendorf credit union.It happened just before 1 p.m. Saturday at the IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union on AAA Court.Police say the man showed a handgun and then ran out with an undisclosed amount of money.Bettendorf police gave Local 4 News two photos of the suspect from the lobby.He's between 5-foot-9 and 6-feet tall.He was wearing a partial face mask, sunglasses, dark hoodie, and gloves.Five employees and a customer were there at the time. No one was hurt.The FBI was called to the scene.If anyone has information concerning the armed robbery at IHMV Credit Union, they are asked to call Detective Buckles at (563) 344-4039.

OurQuadCities.com Iowa previews NCAA Tournament game against Tennessee. OurQuadCities.com

Iowa previews NCAA Tournament game against Tennessee.

The 23-11 Iowa Hawkeyes will take on 30-5 Tennessee on March 24, the winner will advance to the South Region Semifinals, the game will be played in Columbus, Ohio.Hawkeye HeadquartersFor more Hawkeyes coverage, follow @AdamJRossow and @HawkeyeHQ on Twitter and Facebook.

OurQuadCities.com Signs of Spring at Flower and Garden Show OurQuadCities.com

Signs of Spring at Flower and Garden Show

Spring has sprung this weekend at the Flower and Garden Show.Organizers say there are more flowers than ever before at the QCCA Expo Center in Rock Island.There's more than 20-thousand square-feet of flowers, ponds, sunrooms, and garden-related displays with over 100 vendors.Experts are also on-hand to talk design and techniques for your lawn and garden.One first-time visitor told Local 4 News, she's loving this show."I came out today because I'm ready for spring and to put pretty things in my yard," says Pam Brandon of Alexis, IL. "I bought a hummingbird feeder, and I'm excited about that."The Flower and Garden Show continues Sunday.For times, tickets, and the schedule of speakers, click here.  

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Burlington remembers Eddie Breuer, a community character

Burlington's community character, Eddie Breuer, was killed last week.

OurQuadCities.com Higher crest forecast for Mississippi River closes River Drive OurQuadCities.com

Higher crest forecast for Mississippi River closes River Drive

A new prediction on when the Mississippi River will crest means more road closures in Davenport.Due to the change in river level, River Drive is now closed between Division Street and Bridge Avenue. Westbound River Drive is being detoured north on Bridge Avenue. Eastbound 3rd Street is being detoured north on Iowa Street. The National Weather Service expects the river to crest at 18.2 feet on Monday, and then hover around 18 feet.River levels are expected to stay high through April.Crews continue to monitor river levels and are prepared to respond, as needed, to changing river levels. The City will not issue another flood update until Monday - unless significant changes in river level or other travel issues require an additional update.​

OurQuadCities.com Iowa Basketball: Luka Garza getting it done in March. OurQuadCities.com

Iowa Basketball: Luka Garza getting it done in March.

Luka Garza had a huge game for the Hawkeyes in their win over Cincinnati, Garza scored 20 points and had 7 rebounds, but what a season it has been for the Iowa Hawkeye.Hawkeye HeadquartersFor more Hawkeyes coverage, follow @AdamJRossow and @HawkeyeHQ on Twitter and Facebook.

Quad-City Times Mississippi River exceeding major flood stage, but bigger flood could be on the way Quad-City Times

Mississippi River exceeding major flood stage, but bigger flood could be on the way

The Mississippi River at Lock and Dam 15, Rock Island, moved over 18 feet Saturday on its way to a new forecasted crest of 18.2 feet some time during the day Monday.

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Military IDs 2 US service members killed in Afghanistan

The men were identified Saturday as Spc. Joseph P. Collette, 29, of Lancaster, Ohio, and Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay, 33, of Cortez, Colorado.

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Iowa State, Iowa DOT looking at heated pavement

Roadways can turn hazardous and deadly during winter’s wrath, and a project under way in Iowa is looking at one possible solution: Heating the pavement.

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Trump approves disaster declarations for flooded Iowa counties

President Donald Trump has approved major disaster declarations for 56 of Iowa's 99 counties, White House officials said in a Saturday news release.

Quad-City Times Old West gets new life at Q-C convention Quad-City Times

Old West gets new life at Q-C convention

WQAD.com Man shot while trying to kill a cockroach WQAD.com

Man shot while trying to kill a cockroach

DETROIT- A man trying to kill a pest ended up shooting his foot instead. The wheelchair-bound 50-year-old man threw his shoe at a cockroach inside his home, according to WDIV. However, he kept his revolver inside the shoe. When he threw his shoe the gun discharged and shot him in the foot. There is currently no word on the man’s condition.

WQAD.com Listen up for the Iowa siren tests WQAD.com

Listen up for the Iowa siren tests

MUSCATINE- Don’t be alarmed when sirens start going off. On March 27 Iowa has its annual state-wide tornado drill. A test tornado watch alarm will start at about 10 a.m. A test warning will begin at 10:15 a.m. Additionally, the National Weather Service will turn on the all-hazards weather radio system and the Emergency Alert system on local radio and TV stations. The outdoor warning sirens in Atalissa, Conesville, Fruitland, Muscatine, Nichols, West Liberty and Wilton will be turned on to see if they’re working. If there is actual severe weather anywhere in Iowa on March 27 the drill will be postponed until the 28th or 29th. A press release from Muscatine  encouraged citizens to review their home protection plan.

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Davenport salon gives free haircuts to Kings Harvest Homeless Shelter guest

A Davenport salon gave free haircuts to anyone staying at Kings Harvest Homeless Shelter.

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Annual caregiver conference held at St. Ambrose

Over 100 people gathered at St. Ambrose University this morning for the annual Family Caregiver Conference.

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Davenport residents clean up major corridors

All across the City of Davenport today from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. community members gathered to pick up litter along major corridors.

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Bettendorf police search for suspect after armed bank robbery

Bettendorf Police say one person is at large after an attempted armed robbery at a Bettendorf bank Saturday

WQAD.com Where are the local Easter Egg hunts? WQAD.com

Where are the local Easter Egg hunts?

Before you find any eggs, you need to know where the Easter Egg Hunts are happening. Check this list for upcoming Easter activities in your area. April 7 Rock Island’s 2nd Annual Underwater Egg Hunt: It turns out the Easter Bunny is an excellent swimmer. From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. thousands of colorful eggs will be ready to grab at the Rock Island Fitness & Activity Center. Bring a swimsuit and a bag for the eggs. Participants will receive a goody bag and a chance to meet the Easter Bunny. The hunt is $5 and pre-registration is required. Register online or call RIFAC at (309) 732-7275 April 13 Nahant Marsh’s Spring Celebration and Eco-Egg Hunt: From 9 a.m. to noon, kids can tromp around a nature preserve while they search for eggs. The Nahant Marsh Education Center in Davenport will hold a Spring Celebration for kids 3-12. In addition to the egg hunt there will be nature themed activities for families to learn about local wildlife. It is $7 per child or $5 for members. Children two and under can get in for free. Money raised will support environmental education and natural resource projects. Pre-registration is recommended. Register online or call 563.336.3370. Muscatine Third Annual Parks & Recreation Easter Egg Hunt: From 10 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. the Muscatine Parks & Rec Depaertment will hold a family friendly event in Weed Park. The hunt begins at the Rose Garden playground at 10 a.m. The event is free. For more information call the Parks & Rec department at (563) 263-0241 April 14 Downtown Davenport Egg Hunt: Eggs with candy, live music, face painting, food trucks, and bouncy houses- the CITY Church will hold an Easter extravaganza in downtown Davenport. The celebration will take place after the Sunday service from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Click here for more information. If you have an event you’d like to be added to this list, send us an email at ‘news@wqad.com’

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Attempted robbery at Bettendorf credit union

Bettendorf, Iowa- An attempted robbery took place March 23 at the IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union. At approximately 1 p.m. two men attempted to rob the credit union north of the Palmer Hills Golf Course. The current situation at the credit union is unknown. Police have responded. This is a breaking story. Stay tuned for updates.

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Scribble: Emma Lincoln

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Mississippi River Trails

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Births for Saturday, March 23, 2019

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY BETTENDORF

Friday, March 22nd, 2019

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Mixed martial artists across the country are facing off in Davenport at the River Center.

Mixed martial artists across the country are facing off in Davenport at the river center. It's the seventh annual caged aggression - a two-day MMA competition.KWQC's Sarah Jones met with one of Davenport's own who will be competing. And with the owner of caged aggression mixed martial arts.

OurQuadCities.com Iowa beats Cincinnati 79-72 in NCAA Tournament. OurQuadCities.com

Iowa beats Cincinnati 79-72 in NCAA Tournament.

The Iowa Hawkeyes defeated Cincinnati 79-72 in a first round NCAA Tournament game.Luka Garza led the way with 20 points, the Hawkeyes are now 23-11 with the win.Hawkeye HeadquartersFor more Hawkeyes coverage, follow @AdamJRossow and @HawkeyeHQ on Twitter and Facebook.

WQAD.com Wilton Police getting calls about ‘rough-looking’ foxes WQAD.com

Wilton Police getting calls about ‘rough-looking’ foxes

WILTON, Iowa-- Sergeant David Clark with the Wilton Police Department says people are used to seeing a few foxes here and there around town. But over the past week, the police station has been getting a lot of calls from people seeing them everywhere. "It's just not normal," Sgt. Clark says. "This year we seem to have an influx. On average, we get at least a few calls, but sometimes it's upwards of six or ten calls a day, reference just people seeing foxes in the area." The canines have been spotted near the elementary school playground and by the cemetery across town. People commenting on Facebook have seen them near a trailer park and in their own neighborhoods. Sgt. Clark says people have been calling in about the foxes because of their somewhat frazzled appearance. "They're looking a little rough," he says. Several photos on Facebook show foxes that are thin, losing their fur and missing their trademark fluffy tails. "They're having that winter coat start to come off so they might be shedding some of that fur," says Derrick Slutts, a conservation officer with the Iowa DNR. "I know it's hard to talk about mange but that could be a possibility though." Slutts says mange is a skin disease caused by mites. It can be fatal for foxes and can transfer to coyotes and dogs. He says that's rare and people don't have much reason to be concerned. "It seems like we get an uptick in animals getting out and about," Slutts says. "It's their mating season, coming up here, especially with fox." Slutts reminds people not to leave food out for the foxes. He says if they start damaging property, you can pay to have them trapped and relocated. Otherwise, they typically avoid people, pets and children. "They're solitary animals," he says. "They don't want to be around people or pets. And they're gonna be more scared of you than you are of them."

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Iowa/Iowa State fans enjoying NCAA tournament games

The month of March means the college basketball tournament, and with the men's and women's teams from Iowa and Iowa State in the tourneys, fans are out in full force.

WQAD.com YOUR HEALTH: A better way to take chemo?  Perhaps cows have the answer WQAD.com

YOUR HEALTH: A better way to take chemo? Perhaps cows have the answer

DENVER, Colorado – We all know someone who's had chemotherapy. Many people who have gone through it can tell you getting those IV drips in the hospital is one of the worst parts. But what if you could take those powerful chemotherapy drugs right in your own home? That's just one of the benefits of an innovative therapy coming from an unlikely source. It's helped Ana Garcia Gustafson who is fighting pancreatic cancer. "I'm giving it all I can give!   Kickin' it in the derriere." To keep hope alive, she takes a mix of potent chemo drugs.  Treatment days are six-hour infusions. "That's pretty tough for an old lady." Some chemo drugs can be given orally, but many must be given by IV. "Some drugs just cannot survive the condition in the stomach," explained Tom Anchordoquy, a pharmaceutical scientist at the University of Colorado's Skaggs School of Pharmacy. "It'd make things a lot easier and cheaper." He's putting powerful drugs into raw milk. Milk particles can survive harsh stomach conditions and make it to the bloodstream, right where cancer drugs need to be. "This particle goes in and it protects it," he explained.   "It's like you'd be surrounded by a shield." That means patients could take powerful drugs that normally have to be given by IV orally at home.  And potent drugs too dangerous for humans could now work when attached to milk particles. "By putting them in these particles, we can hopefully minimize their toxicity a little bit and make them a little more amenable to human use, said Anchordoquy. NEW RESEARCH: Extensive research is now being conducted using particles from raw milk, attempting to encapsulate chemotherapy drugs in them.  This creates a barrier or shield that could protect the drug from the acidic enzymes in the stomach, allowing the drug to move from the digestive tract into the blood.  If successful, the drug would then circulate in the bloodstream and treat the cancer patient in this way.  Right now researchers are focused on one particular drug, Irinotecan. His biggest supporter is Ana. "What a great mind to think outside the box!" With hope intact, Ana's learning to live a new normal. "We'll take it one day at a time.  I want to live." Scientists say getting treated at home is a big plus for patients undergoing chemotherapy.   But researchers are even more excited about what this technique could mean for future treatments. Very powerful drugs that cannot be used in humans right now could soon be a real option just by attaching them to milk particles. If this story has impacted your life or prompted you or someone you know to seek or change treatments, please let us know by contacting Jim Mertens at jim.mertens@wqad.com or Marjorie Bekaert Thomas at mthomas@ivanhoe.com.

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Woman spots rare "one-in-a-million" yellow cardinal

Sighting made in Alabama

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Look up: Northern lights to dip into the Midwest

The aurora borealis should be visible across the northern tier of states, dipping as far as south as Iowa in the middle of the country and Washington and Maine on the coasts.

WQAD.com Rock Island to introduce new regulations for Airbnb users WQAD.com

Rock Island to introduce new regulations for Airbnb users

ROCK ISLAND, Illinois -- With some local homeowners using Airbnb to earn extra money, disagreements over how the popular online booking service should be regulated has put some neighbors at odds. The city of Rock Island in considering new rules for home sharing platforms like Airbnb. City Manager Randy Tweet said city staff would present a proposal to city council sometime next month. Airbnb host Debbie Freiburg said she loved having guests in the lower unit of her home. "It's been the most exciting thing I've ever done in my life," she said. "I love it. Love the people. And I hope to continue someday." She advertised it as a "Private Hideaway in the Woods" on the platform until recently -- she's been barred from using it since Rock Island city council voted 4-3 in January to deny her a special use permit. "My view is that it's just a bad idea," said Rock Island 4th Ward Alderman Stephen Tollenaer. "I'm here to protect the neighborhoods. That's what the special permit does, it's the perfect system the way it is," he said. One of Debbie's neighbor's started a petition, signed by seven people, complaining about the traffic coming down their dead-end street and the strangers coming to stay on their block. The neighbor declined to be interviewed by News Eight, but said that most people wouldn't want such a business on their block. Debbie says her guests are wonderful people. "They want to stay with a family. They want to stay in a home," she said. She's hopeful that the city will rethink how it handles the gig economy and services like Airbnb. But until then, her private hideaway is an empty nest.    

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#NebraskaStrong: Nebraska Gray Television stations to raise money for historic flood relief efforts

Several Gray Television stations in Nebraska are joining efforts to help those in the state affected by the recent flooding.

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Giuliani: Trump lawyers want early look at Mueller's findings before they are made public

Giuliani: Trump lawyers want early look at Mueller's findings before they are made public

WQAD.com Local veteran gets free car WQAD.com

Local veteran gets free car

  MOLINE- A local car salesman gave a two-time Purple Heart recipient the gift of mobility. Local army veteran Leo Kaalberg is the proud new owner of a Honda Accord. Kaallberg served 4 combat tours in Iraq and has since come upon hard times, he says he couldn't transport his family around town. But now automotive Central in East Moline gifted him a car. The first thing Kaalberg says he will do with his new car is to pick up his kids from school.  

OurQuadCities.com Power struggle: fossil fuels poised to reap reward of Trump administration rules change OurQuadCities.com

Power struggle: fossil fuels poised to reap reward of Trump administration rules change

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WCIA) -- A power struggle over which companies can set the price of energy is brewing at a little-known federal agency, and clean energy advocates warn it could mean millions of Illinois residents might have to pay more for their electric bill."If we do nothing, rates are going to go up this year," said Jen Walling, the Executive Director of the Illinois Environmental Council.A statement from the Citizens Utility Board added, "If the General Assembly doesn’t act this spring, Illinois consumers would be forced to pay more for dirty energy we don't need."A recent order from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) threatens to block clean energy developers from bidding on energy capacity at a massive auction in May. If wind, solar, and nuclear developers are prevented from bidding at the capacity auction, they warn natural gas and coal developers would have more latitude and leverage to set their own rates. The rules would, however, allow the Illinois Power Agency to expand its own authority to step in and bid on behalf of nuclear or renewable energy developers, essentially acting as their agent in the capacity auction."What they said to states is that your programs can continue, but you need to develop your own sort of reliability and capacity programs," said David Fein, Exelon's Vice President of State Governmental Affairs."We believe that if designed correctly, you could do it in a manner to reduce costs compared to what customers are paying now," Fein said.Walling and a number of other clean energy advocates suspect the fossil fuel industries are using their clout and leverage in the Trump administration to punish states like Illinois for setting up incentives for nuclear and renewable power developers. Coal and natural gas developers have sometimes struggled to compete with renewable energy prices, which they argue are artificially deflated by state incentives and subsidies.The new FERC rules would effectively prevent nuclear plants, like the ones Exelon operates in Clinton and in the Quad Cities, from getting paid for running around the clock."The technology runs 24/7, 365 days a year," Fein said. "Because of the large amounts of carbon-free power it produces, it is a great agent for addressing climate [change] and making sure that the air emissions stay in check."A 2016 plan enacted under the Rauner administration called the Future Energy Jobs Act (FEJA) provided rewards for Exelon in the form of zero carbon credits. Critics decried the $235 million in annual subsidies to Exelon as a bailout. Supporters hailed it as a long-term economic and environmental victory that kept their Clinton and Quad Cities nuclear plants up and running, and kept their carbon-free, pollution-free plants contributing to the state's electric grid.A study published this week highlighted how much FEJA and another program cost customers in Illinois. The white paper, put out by the Building Owners and Managers Association of Chicago and the Chemical Industry Council of Illinois, claimed the true cost of FEJA and the Energy Infrastructure Modernization Act (EIMA), which was passed under the Quinn administration, was back loaded and wouldn't impact most ratepayers until after 2020."The utility bills that have been introduced have been very impactful to the utility bills that are coming into consumers not only in homes, but in industrial and commercial businesses across the state," said Julie Vahling with AARP Illinois. The senior advocacy group also participated in publishing the study. "It has been very detrimental to people across the board," Vahling said. "The numbers are very impactful, and we want to make sure that the General Assembly, the House and the Senate, before they agree to putting legislation through, that they think about the implications for consumers across the state."The industry report projected Ameren Illinois and ComEd customers will pay a combined $19.4 billion in higher electric bills between 2013 and 2027 as a result of FEJA and EIMA. The study estimates EIMA could cost customers an extra $14.8 billion in higher electric bills between 2013 and 2027, and suggests FEJA could cost ratepayers an extra $4.6 billion over the same span. Walling cast doubt on the study, arguing, "70 percent of the program dollars of the [FEJA] bill went to energy efficiency or renewable energy. For every dollar that we spend on energy efficiency, we save three dollars."While individual rates have crept up in recent years, Illinois consumers are using less energy on average, so the total cost of the electric bill has remained low. The cost of the average electric bill in Illinois is the sixth lowest average of any state in the nation."So I would really question the validity of a study that would say things like clean energy have cost consumers money, because these have been structured in a way to be a real cost savings to keep energy low for average people and to help protect the environment," Walling said. One main reason for low electric bills is due to the raw amount of energy the state produces. "Illinois has the largest amount of nuclear power anywhere in the country," Fein said. "We lead the country in the most clean energy, so nuclear, wind, solar. Illinois is really a leader on clean energy in the country."Propping up nuclear plants with subsidies is also a key component of the long term strategic plan for renewable energy developers to eventually take over the entire industry."If nuclear power plants in Illinois go offline, they will be replaced by coal and natural gas, which are carbon producing fuels," Walling explained. Her group, along with Democratic Governor J.B. Pritzker, has vowed to convert the state to 100 percent reliance on renewable energy by the year 2050."Our Clean Energy Jobs Act does phase out nuclear power over time," Walling said. "It has a set goal for decarbonization in terms of coal and natural gas coming offline, but it has a little longer of a phase out for nuclear power."

WQAD.com Rep. Bustos addresses Rock River flooding WQAD.com

Rep. Bustos addresses Rock River flooding

  MOLINE- The Rock River in Moline is expected to be back under flood stage by March 29. The Rock River hit its crest over the March 16 weekend. Floodwater still surrounds homes and covers streets. March 22, Illinois Congresswoman Cheri Bustos toured the QC area to get a better idea of the impact from the rising waters. Bustos says it's important to see and hear the needs of communities on both the Rock and Mississippi Rivers. The Quad City National Weather Service is predicting a higher risk of flooding this spring, as well as wetter conditions at the end of March. Floods are expected to last until the first half of April.

Quad-City Times Donovan to lead two Scott County emergency agencies Quad-City Times

Donovan to lead two Scott County emergency agencies

Dave Donovan will become the first director to oversee both Scott County's emergency management and the county-wide consolidated 911 system.

OurQuadCities.com Mistrial declared in hammer-wielding case OurQuadCities.com

Mistrial declared in hammer-wielding case

The trial of Latrice Lacey is declared a mistrial by the judge on Mar. 22.Lacey, the director of the Davenport Civil Rights Commision, is accused of hitting her ex-boyfriend with a sledgehammer last April.She testified the man damaged her boyfriend's car, and she was on her way to report the crime to police.Instead, she and a friend confronted him at work and got into a fight.Lacey's attorney argues she acted in self-defense, and that the man assaulted and harassed Lacey in the past.Prosecutors say lacey started the fight and should be held responsible.

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Police: Man douses Cong. Steve King with glass of water

CO suspect charged after Friday incident

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Wisconsin mother receives message from daughter days after girl's tragic death

Written on the door was a quote: "Someday you will look back and know exactly why this had to happen to you."

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Jimmy Carter's new milestone: longest-lived US president

Nearly four decades after voters unceremoniously rejected then-President Jimmy Carter's bid for a second term, the 39th president has reached a milestone that electoral math cannot dispute: He is now the longest-living chief executive in American history.

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1-year-old boy fatally mauled by 2 dogs in Fresno

A 1-year-old boy who wandered out of his grandparents' house in Fresno was fatally mauled by two dogs that entered their front yard

OurQuadCities.com Local girl scouts earn cybersecurity badges OurQuadCities.com

Local girl scouts earn cybersecurity badges

The Girl Scouts USA has a new patch that's a sign of the times - for cybersecurity.Young girls will be able to play a custom-made game to learn about privacy, online identities, security, and cyberbullying.It's part of thirty STEM-related badges rolled out last year.Local 4's James Sears caught up with a local troop where several girls have earned the new patch - all without touching a computer.Troop 1673 leader Maria Hamann uses games to teach her 7-year-old girls the age-appropriate lessons of cybersecurity."It really broke it down in simple terms what identity means, and how somebody can change their identity on the computer," says Hamann. "So that was good to learn even at this young age."There are now three cybersecurity badges - basics, safeguard, and investigator - and three activities to earn them.The girls learn about the parts of the computer by making faces and motions.Who they can trust in their neighborhood by running to different colored mats on the floor.And to show how identity can change online, they play dress-up."It's fun for them to come in and see a box of clothes and pretend to be somebody else," says Hamann. "But then when they sit down, and we talk about serious side of it. Okay, you changed yourself into somebody else, anybody can do that on the screen."Serious lessons, for when the girls are ready to get on the computer."Never go by somebody you don't know and don't trust," says Makayla MIller of Troop 1673."They could do something bad like get into your game," says Myra Hamann."And they can send bad messages to you," says Sloan Varner.Teaching lessons from the past, while incorporating the present."Back in 1912, it's get outdoors, be risk takers, try new things, I think that still holds true today," says Hamann. "I think the more we add stem badges and stem requirements, the girls thrive in that, and they can learn to be leaders in those fields."Hamann sees more stem and coding in the girl scouts' future, as they work to fill-in the gender gap roles.To learn more about the girl scouts, click here.  

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Florida Man Googles self to find out which Florida Man he is

A new social media challenge is allowing people to look up what version of "Florida Man" they are based on their birthdays.

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Illinois State Police remind people to slow down

Illinois State Police remind people to slow down

WQAD.com Woman claims mother is being mistreated at Rosewood Care Center WQAD.com

Woman claims mother is being mistreated at Rosewood Care Center

MOLINE, Illinois -- A woman staying at Rosewood Care Center in Moline says she has been mistreated by staff. Rosewood Care Center is a place where people can go through rehab with the goal of going back home. So Angie Huff thought her mother, Glenda, would be home by now. "In an ideal world we were hoping she would be there maybe 4 to 6 weeks," Huff said. Instead, Angie says her mother is missing scheduled appointments, not getting her proper medicine, and staff is being too rough getting her in and out of bed. "When she told me that they had mistreated her with the hoyer, and dropped her in her chair too hard and she lost her breath," Huff said. "I just, I felt frantic because I don't know how to stop this stuff." Since 2016, Rosewood Care Center has been fined more than $54,000 after several patients reported verbal abuse and neglect. "I don't understand how a facility that helps people can do things like that and get by with it," Huff said. "I want to go stay there all day and watch to make sure they don't do anything like that... but I can't." News 8 reached out to Rosewood Care Center for comment. Administrator, Janet Holmberg, said our inquiries would need to go through corporate. News 8 has not yet heard back.

Quad-City Times Terrorist attacks bring end of innocence for houses of worship Quad-City Times

Terrorist attacks bring end of innocence for houses of worship

Terrorist attacks like last week's attack on a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, have led to the end of innocence for houses of worship.

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Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs law providing military family benefits

Gov. Kim Reynolds has signed a bill into law that expands the availability of grant funding for seriously injured veterans to provide money so that family members may be with the veteran during a lengthy recovery.

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Mueller concludes Russia probe, delivers report to AG Barr

Special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump

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Federal government preparing to help Nebraskans impacted by flooding

Both FEMA and the USDA are preparing to help as Nebraskans begin long-term recovery from floods.

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Lawmakers accuse soy, almonds of diluting milk's brand

Senators and representatives from dairy states want a tighter definition of 'milk'

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Appeal halts movement on Rock Island County Courthouse demolition

ROCK ISLAND, Illinois — The pending demolition of the Rock Island County Courthouse remains on hold because of an appeal. In early February, a handful of preservation groups filed a lawsuit against the Rock Island County Public Building Commission and the Rock Island County Board.   Click here to see the lawsuit.  But on Tuesday, March 19 a Peoria County Judge dismissed all counts against the Rock Island County Board and Public Building Commission.  According to County Attorney John McGehee, the lawsuit claimed the county and the building commission violated the Historic Resources Preservation Act, but the judge ruled the county is not subject to that act. In response, Landmarks Illinois, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, filed an appeal; it was filed Thursday, March 21 in Peoria County.   The appellate court has five days to decide how to move forward. According to Rock Island City Manager Randall Tweet, the city has all the paperwork needed to issue a demolition permit to Rock Island County. As the appeal remains in limbo, there is a hold on any activity regarding the courthouse, so no demolition will not be allowed for the time being.

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Mueller finishes Russia investigation, submits report to Justice Department

Robert Mueller has submitted his final report on the Russia investigation to the Justice Department, according to reports.

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Iowa launches flood hotline for 2019 season

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds announced Friday the creation of a flood hotline and website for information on flood recovery.

WQAD.com Robert Mueller ends investigation, delivers report to attorney general WQAD.com

Robert Mueller ends investigation, delivers report to attorney general

WASHINGTON – Special counsel Robert Mueller has finished his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election. Mueller’s confidential report has been delivered to Attorney General William Barr, the Justice Department announced Friday. This story is breaking and will be updated.

OurQuadCities.com Veteran gets a car donated to him OurQuadCities.com

Veteran gets a car donated to him

A man who put is life on the line for our country is being given a car.A 1997 Honda Accord has been donated to 38-year-old Leo Kaalberg of Moline.During one of his tours, his convoy was ambushed and shrapnel tore through his body.Kaalberg's service earned him two purple hearts.The car was donated by Automotive Central in East Moline.

WQAD.com Woman who was smallest baby born in Texas now works at NICU that saved her life WQAD.com

Woman who was smallest baby born in Texas now works at NICU that saved her life

TEMPLE, Texas – When Tammy Lewis was born, she was 3½ months early and weighed in at only 1 pound 4 ounces. Her family faced the harsh reality their newborn’s survival rate was 5-10%. But Lewis beat the odds and now, 34 years later, she works in the same NICU that saved her life. “I was the smallest surviving baby in the state of Texas, at the time,” Lewis said. “I was born at 24 weeks. Normal gestation is 40 weeks.” When Tammy Lewis was born, she was 3 1/2 months early and weighed in at only 1 pound 4 ounces. (Courtesy of Tammy Lewis) Lewis spent the first 3½ months of her life in the NICU at Scott and White Hospital, now named McLane Children’s Medical Center Baylor Scott & White. She was a micro-preemie and had tubes hooked up to her to help her tiny lungs breathe. Years later, she works alongside some of the same doctors and nurses who treated her as an infant. “I wanted to be able to give back to the patients and families in the same situation that I was in,” said Lewis. When deciding what career she wanted to pursue after high school, it was between teaching and the medical field. “Once I started researching the medical field, I talked to a program director and immediately fell in love with it,” said Lewis.”This is where God was leading me to be.” Tammy Lewis (Baylor Scott & White Health) in 2009, Lewis started working as a respiratory therapist at McLane, in Temple, Texas, which serves central Texas. It’s home to a level four NICU, which is the highest level of care. In her daily job, she connects ventilators and breathing tubes, just like the ones that helped her breathe as a baby. “As I work, I get daily remainders of how blessed I am to be here today,” she said. Lewis has two children, 6 and 3, but neither was a micro-preemie. “My oldest threatened to be a preemie at 37 weeks.” As she treats patients, she brings hope to the families as she shares her story of survival and motherhood with them. “You see parents get rough news and need some brightness and hope in the day,” she said. “There are success stories and I am one of them.” The hospital features her on its “Hall of Hope,” where it highlights babies with difficult journeys who have survived. Lewis said workers in the NICU become like a part of the patients’ families, because they work so closely monitoring the infant, all with the goal of getting the babies healthy enough to go home. “There are lots of long hard days that everyone puts in and it’s very rewarding to see them grown up.” A highlight of her work, Lewis said, is seeing those babies come back to visit. She said that process has come full circle for the doctors and nurses who took care of her. “It doesn’t get much better than to take a 1 pound baby and then watch it grow up to a little human being.”

OurQuadCities.com Photos: Hawkeyes 79, Cincinnati 72 OurQuadCities.com

Photos: Hawkeyes 79, Cincinnati 72

The No. 10 seed Hawkeyes hit the road to Columbus and beat 7-seed Cincinnati in Ohio on Friday for a first round win in the NCAA Tournament, rallying from 11 down early.Iowa will play Tennessee or Colgate on Sunday. For more Hawkeyes coverage, follow @AdamJRossow and @HawkeyeHQ on Twitter and Facebook. #Hawkeyes win. #MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/HHKR3SWvmY— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Fantastic 2nd half performance giving Iowa the upset over Cincinnati. Luka Garza and Jordan Bohannon exclaiming "yes, sir! " as they left the floor in Columbus. #MarchMadness #Hawkeyes@HawkeyeHQ— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Final: @IowaHoops 79, Cincinnati 72. #Hawkeyes #MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/RXZIgAYUmr— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 Rebounds are now 31-30 Cincy. It was 21-15 at halftime...major stones by Iowa on the defensive glass this half.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 It's 73-64 #Hawkeyes with 1:07 to play. #MarchMadness— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 BOHANNON.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Wieskamp once again, this time with the biggest bucket of the game. Triple puts Iowa up 70-64 with 1:39 remaining#MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 WIESKAMP.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Buckle up folks! #Hawkeyes pic.twitter.com/4QrzlTInja— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 #Hawkeyes up 64-62 with 3:44 to go. #MarchMadness— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 Wieskamp 3 ties it at 59. 6:30 left in 1st half#MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Defensive pressure really working for Iowa this half. Forcing turnovers and bad shots, Iowa now leads 53-52#MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Iowa takes it's 2nd lead of the game, but Cincy takes it right back. 42-40#MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Halftime: @IowaHoops 36, Cincinnati 31. #Hawkeyes— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 Halftime: Iowa 31, Cincinnati 36. All things considered, that's a great 1st half finish for the #Hawkeyes— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 And they do just that.#Cincinnati 36#Hawkeyes 31 Halftime in Columbus.#MarchMadness https://t.co/PJIFxLRpcX— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 And Wieskamp cuts it to 34-29 Cincinnati. The freshman with 10 pts so far— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Garza and Wieskamp coming to life late in the half. #Hawkeyes deficit is 8 w/ 1:57 to play...getting it to a two-possession game at half would be huge win for Iowa.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 #Hawkeyes got Garza going, but a couple Cincinnati 3's helped propel them to a 32-21 lead with under 4 to go— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Timeout. Bearcats with a 12-0 run to lead 16-5 with 12:47 to go in the half— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Cincy with a dozen straight points after Iowa led 5-4. Danger time for the Hawks.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 2 missed shots and a turnover. Cincy up 12-5#MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Wieskamp guards Cumberland in man-to-man as expected. #Hawkeyes hedging and helping early to force other Bearcats to score. 8-5 Cincy, 4 mins in.— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Isaiah Moss with the first 5 pts for the #Hawkeyes. #MarchMadness— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Here we go! #Hawkeyes#MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/17vZAAwwJ2— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Let’s go. #MarchMadness #Hawkeyes #Cincinnati pic.twitter.com/1OYhVQIyZn— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Here come the #Hawkeyes#MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/Wf6LIklfz6— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 And the Bearcats take the floor#MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/VMJ6V5bQM8— Dan Vasko (@danvasko) March 22, 2019 Here come the #Hawkeyes! #MarchMadness pic.twitter.com/H1OI3ZgzKv— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Judging by the crowd outside on the way to the arena, it’s definitely going to feel like a road game for the Hawks. https://t.co/8WdzGEdIz2— Adam Rossow (@AdamJRossow) March 22, 2019 Buddy Hield. Jimmer Fredette. Tyler Hansbrough. Names these #Hawkeyes remember watching in the #NCAATournament and now get a chance to join in making #MarchMadness memories. https://t.co/8NseBq8LSU— Hawkeye Headquarters (@HawkeyeHQ) March 22, 2019 Cincinnati presents unique challenge for 'overlooked' #Hawkeyes https://t.co/SbamuwqK0o— Hawkeye Headquarters (@HawkeyeHQ) March 22, 2019 It's gameday × 2! #Hawkeyes #MarchMadness #NCAAW pic.twitter.com/u4D7tMggmY— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 Baer! pic.twitter.com/8JxRhNqSxQ— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019 BAER! pic.twitter.com/VyqV9hSuky— HawkeyeHQ.com's Ryan Jaster (@Hawkologist) March 22, 2019

QCOnline.com Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist to offer tips to make a difference QCOnline.com

Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist to offer tips to make a difference

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist and author Nicholas Kristof has spanned the globe to expose stories of suffering, injustice and kindness. For his newest book, the 59-year-old returns to his small Oregon hometown to uncover a different tale of…

WQAD.com Jurors examine evidence against Davenport civil rights commissioner accused of sledgehammer attack WQAD.com

Jurors examine evidence against Davenport civil rights commissioner accused of sledgehammer attack

DAVENPORT, Iowa — Jurors have begun examining the evidence against a Davenport Civil Rights Commissioner accused of having attacked her ex-boyfriend with a sledgehammer. Latrice Lacey is charged with three counts of domestic abuse and one count of first-degree harassment. Her case went to jurors at 11 A.M on Friday. In trying to get a guilty verdict on all counts, Scott County Assistant Attorney Samuel Huff must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Lacey attacked her ex-boyfriend Clyde Richardson last April 30 outside his work place on Pershing Avenue, with intent and with a dangerous weapon. “She showed up there for one reason, to confront him, not talk to, to confront,” Huff told jurors in closing arguments. “She grabbed hammer, there was no retreat.” He urged jurors to review the video that recorded it all: “You see exactly how she swings it. Her arm comes up…” But Lacey’s defense attorney, Murray Bell, says it was Richardson who had been the aggressor. “It was a pattern of rage, rage, rage. ‘Oh I’m sorry.’ And rage rage rage,” he reminded jurors. Witnesses testified Richardson choked Lacey and damaged her car in the months leading up to the confrontation. “He couldn’t control himself, so she goes to a public place …to get it stopped. He attacks her… Bell says she acted to protect herself and a friend who was with her. “She was acting in self defense. She was justified,” he said. “She got the hammer after he was on top of her, in the car, and said, ‘I’m gonna kill you!'” Richardson, Lacey’s ex, never took the stand. But Huff told jurors, “From day one I told you he wasn’t gonna be here.” “That makes things difficult. What makes things less difficult is the video recording of this incident,” he said. The prosecution had the opportunity to leave jurors with the last word: “This was not justification, it was retaliation, plain and simple. She had had enough and she was going to handle it the way she wanted to.” Lacey could face several years in prison if convicted.

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Congress debates 'Charleston gun loophole' bill in DC

Could the Charleston church shooting have been prevented? That’s the question being raised in a heated debate about gun control on Capitol Hill

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Substitute teacher arrested after gun fires in class

Police have arrested a substitute teacher in Alabama after his gun went off in a first-grade classroom

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Remains of pilot killed during WWII laid to rest in Utah

The remains of a World War II pilot have been laid to rest in his home state of Utah after being returned from Germany

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Small solar storm coming to Earth but no big light show

Space weather forecasters say a solar storm is heading to Earth, but don't expect a big light show

WQAD.com Police looking for man who kicked 78-year-old woman in the face on New York City subway WQAD.com

Police looking for man who kicked 78-year-old woman in the face on New York City subway

NEW YORK — Authorities are searching for a man seen in cellphone video kicking a woman’s face and body several times on a New York City subway train, police said Friday. On Sunday, March 10, at about 3:10 a.m inside of the Nereid Avenue/ White Plains Road subway station in the Bronx, a man approached a 78-year-old woman who was seated, and began to punch and kick her numerous times in her face and her body, police said. The horrendous assault was captured on cellphone video. The disturbing footage shows the man kicking the seated victim six times, twice in the head and four times in her upper body, before walking off the subway yelling, “Now Worldstar that!” The woman, who was seen with several bags, tried to block the kicks with her left hand, while stunned passengers watched, the video showed. Warning: Video of the attack, seen below, may be difficult to watch for some viewers. The man left the No. 2 train at the station and fled on foot. The woman rode the train one more northbound stop and exited at the Wakefield-241 Street /White Plains Road station, where she was met by EMS. She suffered multiple bruises and was bleeding from cuts to the face, police said. She was treated on scene by EMS and refused further medical attention, according to police. Many who saw the clip posted to Twitter by @BKLYNRELL1 blasted the passengers on the train for recording the incident instead of coming to the woman's aid. "For everybody asking me if this is my video. No, and if I was there it was not going down like that. He was not getting away," @BKLYNRELL1 tweeted. "New York City has to get better with 'minding our own business.' See something say something goes for everything." The man is described as being 40 years old, 6 feet tall, 180 pounds, with a black goatee. He was last seen wearing a black jacket, black knit cap, long black and white checkered scarf, metal framed glasses and black pants.

WQAD.com City offers bounty to anyone who cuts down Bradford pear trees WQAD.com

City offers bounty to anyone who cuts down Bradford pear trees

FAYETTEVILLE, Arkansas — The City of Fayetteville is offering a bounty on Bradford pear trees this spring. Bradford pear trees are considered an invasive species in Northwest Arkansas. They spread quickly and choke out the area’s native trees, shrubs, and flowers. The city says native tree species are more beneficial to the environment and wildlife. To spread awareness and discourage the spread of invasive trees, the city will give one native tree to each person who cuts down a Bradford pear on their property within city limits. The City of Fayetteville says they will not be able to cut down your tree. They say property owners should cut their own tree or hire a company. To qualify, residents should take a picture of their cut-down Bradford pear tree while they are in bloom from mid-March to early April. Then bring the photograph to one of two locations (listed below) or email the picture to urbanforestry@fayetteville-ar.gov. The city asks that you include your name, address, and phone number. Trees will be given away on a first-come-first-serve basis. One hundred native trees will be available; species include American plum, flowering dogwood, eastern redbud, hawthorn and serviceberry.

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Amtrak to Burlington, Mount Pleasant delayed as a result of “historic” floods

Starting March 21, Amtrak will be suspending trains to Burlington and Mount Pleasant as a direct result of “historic” flooding. Amtrak has detoured its California Zephyr onto Union Pacific Railroad tracks in order to keep trains running between Omaha and Chicago. They have not released an estimate for when trains will be running in Southeast Iowa again. Amtrak says the suspensions are due to historic flooding affecting railroad tracks throughout the state. The suspensions are also affecting other Iowa and Illinois communities, customers can contact Amtrak to change or cancel their train reservations without fees. “Amtrak will gladly waive additional charges for customers looking to change their reservation during the modified schedule by calling our reservation center at 800-USA-RAIL.” 

Quad-City Times 'Prioritize what's life-critical': MedForce treats the sickest patients and addresses the most urgent needs in the Quad-Cities Quad-City Times

'Prioritize what's life-critical': MedForce treats the sickest patients and addresses the most urgent needs in the Quad-Cities

No two calls are ever the same for the crew of MedForce Aeromedical Transport.

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Woman accused of hitting pedestrians in Las Vegas apologizes

A woman accused of driving on a Las Vegas Strip sidewalk, killing a pedestrian and injuring more than 30 others has apologized

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Feds won't charge suspect in deadly Texas school shooting

Federal prosecutors say they will not pursue charges at this time against the teenager accused of fatally shooting 10 people at a Texas high school

WVIK Bustos Surveys Flooding WVIK

Bustos Surveys Flooding

Hoping to learn how the federal government can help, Congresswoman Cheri Bustos surveyed flooding in the Quad Cities Friday. Also she and local emergency management officials studied flood maps of the Mississippi and Rock rivers.