QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Friday, December 4th, 2020

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East Moline firefighters respond to house fire Thursday night

East Moline firefighters responded to a house fire in the 4100 block of 6th Avenue around 11:40 p.m. on Thursday.

Quad-City Times Rick's Six: Silvis boys' throw catches NFL attention, Walcott man faces sex charges, and I-74 off-ramp closed today in Moline Quad-City Times

Rick's Six: Silvis boys' throw catches NFL attention, Walcott man faces sex charges, and I-74 off-ramp closed today in Moline

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Births for Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY MOLINE

Thursday, December 3rd, 2020

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Lottery numbers drawn Thursday

ILLINOIS LOTTERY

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Quad Citians could see a COVID-19 vaccine within 2 weeks

Governor Kim Reynolds announces Iowans may be receiving Pfizer vaccines as early as December 13th. Governor J.B. Pritzker says Illinoians can expect them between December 13 and 19th.

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Two injured, sent to hospital following overturned vehicle crash near Illinois construction site

Two individuals were transported to a local hospital after being injured in a vehicle crash that happened Thursday afternoon near a construction site in Jo Daviess County. At approximately 12:18 p.m., the Jo Daviess County Sheriff's Office received a 911 call reporting a two-vehicle traffic crash with injuries. The crash occurred on Highway 20 East, approximately 1/2 of a mile east of South Willow Road, in rural Stockton. The driver of a black 2020 Dodge Ram 1500, a male, was traveling eastbound on Highway 20 East. Meanwhile, the driver of a blue 2017 Ford Escape, a female, followed behind. Both drivers were sole occupants of their vehicles. As the driver of the black Dodge Ram neared a construction site located off the roadway, he slowed his vehicle down in order to make a right-hand turn off the roadway and into the construction site. The driver of the blue Ford Escape then failed to stop her eastbound vehicle and, as a result, rear-ended the black Dodge Ram. After impacting with the black Dodge Ram, the blue Ford Escape then overturned. The driver of the black Dodge Ram was identified as Darron E. Delancy, 30, of Darlington, S.C. The driver of the blue Ford Escape was identified as JoAnne T. Diehl, 61, of Elizabeth, Ill. Both individuals were transported by the Stockton Ambulance and Warren Ambulance Services to Freeport Memorial Hospital for treatment. This crash remains under investigation.

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Multiple drivers injured in crash in Jo Daviess County

Two drivers were transported to a local hospital after a rear-end collision on Hwy 20.

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Clinton, Muscatine Schools returning to in-person learning on Monday

The Clinton and Muscatine Community School Districts are returning to in-person instruction on Monday, Dec. 7.

OurQuadCities.com Police ask for help to find missing woman OurQuadCities.com

Police ask for help to find missing woman

Moline police ask the community's help in finding Kimberly Planthaber, 55, reported missing Wednesday to Moline police. The police department Facebook page says Planthaber possibly is experiencing "an episode of mental confusion, and is without several of her necessary medications." She last was seen wearing a brown sweatshirt, with hair similar to how it is shown in the photo, near 37th Street and 10th Avenue, Moline. Police ask anyone with information about her whereabouts to call 911.

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Moline Police seeking assistance finding missing woman

Kimberly Planthaber was last seen on Dec. 2, 2020, and police are requesting assistance finding her.

WQAD.com Unitypoint Health strengthens visitor restrictions after continued virus surge WQAD.com

Unitypoint Health strengthens visitor restrictions after continued virus surge

The hospital is now only allowing patients to have one specific visitor for the length of their hospitalization.

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QC Chamber of Commerce forecasting brighter economy in 2021

As national metrics point to a hot economy next year, small businesses like Meli's Pancake House are encouraged to remain resilient over the next several months.

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Unitypoint Health strengthens visitor restrictions after continued virus surge

The hospital is now only allowing patients to have one specific visitor for the length of their hospitalization.

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UnityPoint Health - Trinity tightening restrictions, allowing only one visitor per inpatient at hospitals

A continued surge of COVID-19 cases in Illinois and Iowa has UnityPoint Health - Trinity hospitals making modifications to its visitor limitations. Effective Monday, Dec. 7, only one designated visitor per inpatient is allowed during visiting hours throughout the length of the patient's hospitalization. UnityPoint Health - Trinity says the modification is temporary and will continue until further notice, as it creates "added protections" for their patients and health care workers while "allowing hospitalized patients an opportunity to have a designated family member or loved one visit." "We recognize there are times when having a visitor or family member present is crucial. In these cases, a visitor who is designated by the patient, based on the exceptions below, must stay in the patient's room and wear a mask the entire time of their visit. Once the visitor leaves the patient's room, they must leave the hospital," said UnityPoint Health - Trinity in a news release. They added, in all cases, a visitor will only be allowed to see a patient if they are symptom-free — meaning the visitor does not have symptoms of respiratory infection that include a fever, runny nose, cough and shortness of breath. UnityPoint Health - Trinity says children under the age of 18 "will not be allowed as a visitor, except under extraordinary circumstances." The following exceptions apply to all UnityPoint Health - Trinity hospitals: One visitor, per length of the patient's hospitalization, will be allowed to visit their hospitalized loved one between the hours of noon and 6 p.m. The visitor must enter the hospital through the main entrance for screening prior to their visit and must remain in the patient's room throughout the duration of the visit. Visitors are asked to remain masked while in the patient's room. Visitors will not be allowed for patients with a pending or positive COVID-19 test.Patients who have an appointment at a clinic located within the hospital or are visiting the emergency room may have one person with them.Obstetric patients in labor may have one partner and one birth support person accompany them. Following delivery, postpartum patients may have one partner or support person with them. The support person is invited to return during visiting hours.Prenatal patients may have one partner or support person accompany them to appointments.Nursery and Neonatal Special Care Unit (NSCU) patients may have one birth parent plus one significant other who must remain in the room for the duration of the visit.Patients where the end-of-life is imminent may have two visitors. Two visitors may also be present during discussion of end-of-life care decisions.Patients who are discussing palliative care decisions may have one visitor.Patients who have cognitive impairments or developmental delay where caregiver provides safety may have one visitor.Minors under the age of 18 may have two parents or guardians accompany them in all care areas.Patients undergoing surgery or procedures may have one visitor stay in the surgical waiting area or ambulatory room until the procedure is finished. After speaking with the surgeon following the procedure, the visitor must leave the hospital as soon as possible. The visitor may return during visiting hours.Patients who require mobility assistance may have one visitor accompany them to laboratory or radiology appointments. "We understand these changes may impose an inconvenience to families, but they are important steps to keep everyone as safe and healthy as possible. Limiting visits to hospitalized patients will keep them safe while in our care," said UnityPoint Health - Trinity. "The community is encouraged to continue practicing social distancing, masking and performing frequent hand hygiene to reduce the spread of COVID-19."

WVIK Fast Vaccine Rollout Justified WVIK

Fast Vaccine Rollout Justified

Vaccines for the coronavirus are being rolled out much faster than usual, but don't worry. That's according to Doctor Louis Katz, Medical Director of the Scott County Health Department. He says the process is careful but streamlined compared to past drug approvals. He calls it a "public health emergency" that during the last nine months, more than 250,000 people have died in the US due to COVID-19. "Have more deaths in the United States than all of the military conflicts that we've been involved in since I was born in 1950. So I think we're justified in moving towards emergency use authorization as opposed to full approval." Katz knows some of the people involved personally, and says the review panels are independent of any federal agencies, such as the FDA and Department of Health and Human Services. "In fact the only political appointee in any way, shape, or form involved in decisions about this vaccine is the FDA commissioner. But the professionals at the agency, the Center for

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Illinois state Fire Marshal stresses safety when decorating for holidays

More than one-third of home decoration fires are started by candles. The NFPA also reports that US fire departments responded to an average of 780 home structure fires per year that began with decorations between 2013-2017.

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First COVID-19 vaccine shipment to arrive by mid-December, Pritzker says

Gov. J.B. Pritzker says the state is still expected to receive 109,000 dosages of the vaccine in the state’s first shipment this month.

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Police: Multiple vehicles stolen from Van Horn Alfa Romeo-Fiat in Davenport

Police say they have recovered 5 of the 7 vehicles.

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Whiteside County announces 7 deaths due to COVID-19

Health officials also announced 79 new cases of COVID-19.

OurQuadCities.com How families can prepare their kids to limit debt as college loans return OurQuadCities.com

How families can prepare their kids to limit debt as college loans return

Some recent college graduates adjusting to life after earning their degrees face another daunting challenge. The moratorium on federal student loan payments and interest expires at the end of the month. The Secretary of Education issued it in response to the pandemic. A University of Iowa graduate working at a DNA laboratory near the campus says these months of no payments helped her stay afloat. She tells Local 4, out-of-state tuition will have her monthly payments at $1,000 a month. We also spoke to David Nelson, the CEO of NelsonCorp Wealth Management about what families should know as their kids prepare for college. You can find their resources here: https://www.nelsoncorp.com/

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Man arrested on predatory sexual assault, child porn charges in Dixon, Ill.

Police say the investigation began in November.

OurQuadCities.com Detectives: 3 children were in home with loaded gun, meth OurQuadCities.com

Detectives: 3 children were in home with loaded gun, meth

After detectives found a loaded gun and methamphetamine in a home where children were on hand, a Davenport man was being held Thursday on felony charges. Lucas McNulty-Snodgrass, 28, faces charges of felon in possession of a firearm, possession with intent to deliver, child endangerment and having no drug-tax stamp. He was being held on $250,000 bond in Scott County Jail. Shortly after 1 p.m. Wednesday, Davenport police executed a search warrant in the 700 block of East 29th Street, Davenport, for a drug investigation, an arrest affidavit says. Detectives searched McNulty-Snodgrass’s home and found about 262.15 grams of meth, packaged to sell, along with working digital scales, packaging material and cutting agents, chemicals used to "cut" or dilute recreational drugs with something less expensive than the drug itself. Detectives also seized several hundred fake prescription pain pills suspected of being fentanyl, a synthetic opioid used to treat pain, and $5,824 in currency. “Some of the methamphetamine located in the residence could have been accessed by the children who live at the residence,” detectives say. Three children were in the residence. Detectives also found two guns, one of them loaded, in the living room accessible to anyone in the residence.   McNulty-Snodgrass cannot legally have guns because of a felony conviction from 2017. He also did not have drug-tax stamps affected to the drugs. Arraignment is set for Dec. 31 in Scott County Court.

OurQuadCities.com Dixon man arrested for sexual assault of child, 20 counts of child pornography OurQuadCities.com

Dixon man arrested for sexual assault of child, 20 counts of child pornography

A Dixon, Ill., man is facing more than 20 counts related to sexual assault and child pornography following an ongoing investigation in Lee County. According to the Dixon Police Department, an initial criminal investigation was conducted in November. They say, throughout the course of the investigation, they were able to identify 56-year-old Tod A. Musgrove as the suspect. Musgrove was arrested in the 400 block of E. 1st St. in Dixon on Wednesday, Dec. 2. He was charged for predatory criminal sexual assault of a child, a Class X felony, and 20 counts of child pornography, each Class 2 felonies. Investigators were able to obtain an arrest warrant for Musgrove with a bond amount of $150,000 (10%), and he was taken into custody without incident. Musgrove was then processed and taken to Lee County Jail after not being able to post the required bond. Dixon Chief of Police Steven Howell Jr. would like to remind citizens to report any suspicious activity to the Dixon Police Department at 815-288-4411 or to Crimestoppers at 1-888-Caught-U (1-888-228-4488). Callers do not need to leave their names and are eligible for rewards of up to $1,000 with information leading to an arrest.

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Winter Emergency Overflow shelter opens in Davenport

It will serve those experiencing homelessness.

Quad-City Times What a catch! Silvis boys' Hail Mary throw catches attention of the NFL Quad-City Times

What a catch! Silvis boys' Hail Mary throw catches attention of the NFL

A seconds-long video of two Silvis boys playing backyard catch is a social media rocket.

OurQuadCities.com Breaking down 'COVID Fatigue' OurQuadCities.com

Breaking down 'COVID Fatigue'

COVID Fatigue — it's a term that's popping up during the pandemic. Local experts say it's impacting those on and off the frontlines. It’s something they say people need to continue to fight, too.  For those on the frontlines, the pandemic hits hard. Janet Hill, the COO of the Rock Island County Health Dept. said they’ve been working nonstop.  “7 days a week for 9 months now. We're also doing it under extraordinary stress,” she said.   That added stress is caused by spikes in cases.  “Everytime we see a spike in cases, that's a spike in contact tracing,” she said. UC Davis Health explains COVID fatigue as being tired of being cooped up, careful and scared of the impacts of the virus. For healthcare workers, Hill said it's the feeling of being burnt out.  “The emergency workers, the hospitals, the doctors and nurses, all the staff at doctor's offices — I know that they are running ragged,” she said.  Experts say that COVID fatigue can impact people in different ways. Not just the frontline workers, but people at home, too. Some are being less diligent with social distancing, wearing masks and following the CDC’s guidelines for gatherings due to the burn out.  Steve Kopp, the director of psychology for Genesis Health System, says people are feeling weighed down by restrictions.   "I don't think there's too many people out there right now that don't even kind of understand the term from a real life perspective at this point,” he said. “Some of that cabin fever, the weather changes aren't helping any of that.”  He said focusing on self-care could help.  “Take time to do at least one thing for yourself everyday,” he said.  He also recommends focusing on what you can control as opposed to what you can’t during this time, alongside getting outside when possible, eating healthy foods and getting enough sleep. But, he said being kind to yourself is important, too.  “If you need a Snickers bar, don’t think about the extra calories. Allow yourself to enjoy some of those creature comforts,” he said.   Hill is reminding people to stay focused on stopping the spread.  “When people disregard public health guidance, that is extremely risky behavior that can put not only themselves and their family, but their entire community at risk,” she said. 

WQAD.com QC Chamber of Commerce forecasting brighter economy in 2021 WQAD.com

QC Chamber of Commerce forecasting brighter economy in 2021

As national metrics point to a hot economy next year, small businesses like Meli's Pancake House are encouraged to remain resilient over the next several months.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

10 Quad-City deaths linked to COVID-19 Thursday, 29 deaths in five-day span

The stark COVID-19 news cycle allowed a sliver of hope Thursday as officials in Iowa and Scott County started talking about the rollout of vaccines to combat the virus.

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9 indicted on child sex crimes charges after RI FBI investigation

U.S. Attorney John Milhiser and FBI Springfield Special Agent in Charge Sean M. Cox announced that nine men previously arrested in Rock Island have been indicted on charges of attempted enticement of a child to engage in sexual activity. In addition, several of the defendants have also been charged with related crimes including travel with the intent to engage in illicit sexual activity and soliciting images of child pornography. The men were previously charged by criminal complaint. According to affidavits filed in support of the complaints, each of the men allegedly used mobile dating and social media applications to contact and engage with individuals whom they believed to be minors as young as 11, with the intent of meeting to engage in sexual activity. The defendants and their respective charges follow: + Charles Walter Christopher, 42, of West Liberty, Iowa, a convicted sex offender currently serving a term of supervised release related to a similar case in the Southern District of Iowa; attempted enticement of a minor to engage in illicit sexual activity, travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual activity; +Michael Robert McKinney, 23, of Silvis, Ill.; attempted enticement of a minor;Joseph Allen Wilcher, 39, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; attempted enticement of a minor, travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual activity; + Nicholas Bryan Swank, 31, of Muscatine, Iowa, a convicted sex offender; attempted enticement of a minor, travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual activity, and soliciting child pornography; + Jeffrey Alan Bosaw, 52, of Bloomington, Ill.; attempted enticement of a minor;Douglas L. Christensen, 55, of East Moline, Ill.; attempted enticement of a minor, soliciting child pornography; + Auston M. McLain, 35, of Davenport, Iowa; attempted enticement of a minor, travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual activity and soliciting child pornography; + Damien Pernell Shepherd, 35, of Moline, Ill.; attempted enticement of a minor; and,Douglas Michael Speer, 30, of Johnston, Iowa; attempted enticement of a child (two counts), and travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual activity. The charges are the result of investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation with the assistance of the Rock Island Police Department; Illinois State Police; East Moline Police Department; Davenport Police Department; Galesburg Police Department; Knox County Sheriff’s Office; and, the Macomb Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jennifer L. Mathew and Alyssa A. Raya are representing the federal government in the case prosecutions. If convicted, for the offense of attempted enticement of a minor, each defendant faces a minimum of 10 years and up to life in prison; for travel with the intent to engage in illicit sexual activity, the penalty is up to 30 years in prison; for soliciting images of child pornography, the penalty is five to 20 years in prison. Defendants Christopher, McKinney, Swank, Christensen, Shepherd, and Speer have been ordered detained in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service. Wilcher and McLain were released on bond with conditions. Bosaw remains detained pending a detention hearing scheduled on Dec. 8, 2020. Each defendant is presumed innocent unless proven guilty. These cases were brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative by the Department of Justice to combat child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Quad-City Times As COVID-19 claims another 192 lives in Illinois, officials call for blood donations Quad-City Times

As COVID-19 claims another 192 lives in Illinois, officials call for blood donations

SPRINGFIELD – As the COVID-19 death toll continues to mount, Gov. JB Pritzker and an official from the American Red Cross urged Illinoisans to donate blood to support the state’s health care infrastructure.

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Sen. Grassley, Sen. Ernst release joint statement; ‘Miller-Meeks won her election’

The joint statement was released on Thursday.

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DNR: More than 60% of rivers and streams in Iowa are polluted or compromised

More than 60 percent of Iowa’s rivers and streams are polluted or otherwise compromised, according to a report from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

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Men are more aggressive behind the wheel, AAA says

Speeding, tailgating, merging dangerously and making rude gestures are just some of the things that AAA says makes men more aggressive drivers compared to women.

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Be Aware: Puppy scams are on the rise

Animal adoptions are way up. With many people stuck at home looking for the companionship of pets and because of that, scammers have noticed.

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UnityPoint Health - Trinity to elevate visitor restrictions

The visitor must now wear a mask at all times.

WQAD.com 8 Days of Christmas Sweepstakes: L&W bedding WQAD.com

8 Days of Christmas Sweepstakes: L&W bedding

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, L&W Bedding is by appointment-only. For the 8 Days of Christmas Sweepstakes, L&W is giving away two $50 gift cards and a gift basket.

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Davenport man sentenced to prison in gas station robbery case

He pleaded guilty in October to second-degree robbery, a Class C felony.

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Over 70 in the hospital due to COVID-19 in Rock Island County

Officials say a total of 164 people in the county have died due to the virus.

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7 deaths, 126 new COVID-19 cases in Rock Island County

The Rock Island County Health Department is reporting seven additional deaths from COVID-19. The number of deaths in the county from this virus is now 164. “We offer our sincere condolences and comforting thoughts to the friends and families of these Rock Island County residents,” said Janet Hill, chief operating officer of the Rock Island County Health Department. A man in his 70s and a woman in her 50s, both of whom had been hospitalized, died, as did two women in their 90s, one man in his 90s and one man in his 60s living in long-term-care facilities, as well as one man in his 80s who died at home. In addition, the health department reports 126 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the total number to 8,764. Currently, 77 patients are hospitalized in Rock Island County. The new cases are: · 2 women in their 80s · 3 women in their 70s · 14 women in their 60s · 12 women in their 50s · 10 women in their 40s · 18 women in their 30s · 11 women in their 20s · 5 women in their teens · 3 girls younger than 13 · 2 girl infants 1 or younger · 1 man in his 90s · 1 man in his 80s · 3 men in their 70s · 10 men in their 60s · 3 men in their 50s · 9 men in their 40s · 7 men in their 30s · 5 men in their 20s · 1 man in his teens · 4 boys in their teens · 2 boys younger than 13 No additional information regarding these cases is available due to federal privacy laws. The Rock Island County Health Department asks that you: · Stay home as much as possible and especially when ill · Wear a face covering when you must go out for essential supplies · Keep at least 6 feet between you and anyone else · Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer · Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or into your elbow

WVIK Niabi Wants to Add Rhinos WVIK

Niabi Wants to Add Rhinos

The Niabi Zoo is planning to welcome two, very large new residents sometime next summer. So it's started a fundraising campaign to bring Southern White Rhinos to the zoo.

OurQuadCities.com Illinois' weekly average of COVID-19 deaths surpasses spring spike as state reports 10,959 cases, 192 deaths OurQuadCities.com

Illinois' weekly average of COVID-19 deaths surpasses spring spike as state reports 10,959 cases, 192 deaths

CHICAGO — Illinois is now averaging more COVID-19 deaths over the course of a week than it was when the state saw an initial spike of the disease in May, making it the deadliest period in the state since the start of the pandemic, data released Thursday shows. The Illinois Department of Public Health reported 192 additional COVID-19 deaths Thursday, the second-highest daily total since the start of the pandemic, just a day after the state set a new record. "Will a vaccine help those in hospital affected with virus?" A doctor answers your COVID-19 questions However, in both cases officials said the daily totals were higher because "some data" was delayed due to the holiday weekend. Governor JB Pritzker said Wednesday it is "hard to tell" how much of the daily spikes are due to delays in the data. “It’s just a fact of life that hospitals don’t exactly report exactly the same or exactly at one time, whenever IDPH gets the information they report it to you so that you get it all as fast as we get it,” Pritzker said. Officials typically use a 7-day rolling average when looking at COVID-19 statistics to account for these day-to-day fluctuations in the data. While the weekly average of deaths reported in Illinois began to drop on Thanksgiving Day, the decline was erased by the deaths reported yesterday. The 192 additional deaths reported Thursday bring the state's 7-day average to about 124 COVID-19 related deaths a day, surpassing the previous peak of 117 seen in mid-May. Illinois is averaging more deaths a day than the spring when measured over a longer 14-day period as well. "While it's likely that some of this increase can be attributed to a data lag from the holiday weekend, we also know that higher case numbers and higher numbers of hospitalizations do lead to, tragically, even more lives lost and we've surpassed the spring records by thousands in recent weeks," Pritzker said Wednesday. The IDPH also reported 10,959 new COVID-19 cases Thursday, bringing the state's 7-day average of cases to about 8,900. The average has flattened for the past few days after declining since mid-November. Additionally, the IDPH said 10.4% of tests performed from November 26-December 2 confirmed new cases of COVID-19, representing a slight decline in the case positivity rate. Officials continue to report test results from rapid saliva-based antigen tests as "probable" cases following CDC guidelines. While a decline in reported deaths has been erased in recent days, Illinois has also seen a decline in its 7-day average of reported COVID-19 tests since Thanksgiving. With 106,778 new tests reported Thursday, the decline has stopped but the current 7-day average of about 85,000 tests remains below the 100,000 average seen on Thanksgiving Day. Hospitalizations in Illinois continue to decline, with the IDPH reporting 5,653 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Wednesday night, including 1,170 in intensive care and 693 on ventilators. IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said Wednesday patients are averaging less time in the hospital with COVID-19 than in the spring, with the previous average of 9-11 days declining to about 7-9 days recently. “We’ve cut some time off,” Ezike said. “You have a much better chance of surviving COVID-19 in the hospital now as opposed to wave one." Health officials continue to estimate that 97% of confirmed cases have recovered to date.

OurQuadCities.com Ernst, Grassley: Attempt to overturn election is 'insult' to voters, election process OurQuadCities.com

Ernst, Grassley: Attempt to overturn election is 'insult' to voters, election process

Senator Chuck Grassley and Senator Joni Ernst released a strong statement in support of the election process Thursday, calling an attempt to overturn the results an "insult" to voters and criticizing those who declined to take "legitimate" legal action. They were talking about Rita Hart. Were you thinking of someone else? Mariannette Miller-Meeks beat Hart by six votes in the Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District election after a recount. The results were unanimously certified by Iowa’s Secretary of State, 24 county auditors from both parties and the bipartisan State Board of Canvass. Hart announced Wednesday that she would file an election contest with the U.S. House under the Federal Contested Elections Act. Here's the statement Grassley and Ernst released: “Both the original vote count and recount confirmed Mariannette Miller-Meeks won her election. There are legal avenues through which candidates can litigate election disputes if they believe there are specific election irregularities. Rita Hart declined to take legitimate legal action in Iowa courts and instead chose to appeal to Washington partisans who should have no say in who represents Iowans. That’s an insult to Iowa voters and our nonpartisan election process. We are confident in the fairness and accuracy of Iowa’s election system.” Joint statement from @ChuckGrassley & @SenJoniErnst: @millermeeks won her election. Rita Hart's appeal to @SpeakerPelosi to overturn the #IA02 election is "insult to Iowa voters and our nonpartisan election process." #iapolitics pic.twitter.com/rQoWnIFoVn— Michael Zona (@mjzona) December 3, 2020

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Illinois State Police arrest St. Louis man for driving 117 in a 70 mph zone

Chang Jiang, 28, was charged with speeding over 35 mph and fleeing to elude a police officer.

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Henry County deputies respond to two single-vehicle accidents Thursday morning

Deputies responded to two separate single-vehicle accidents Thursday morning. One man was arrested for driving while intoxicated.

OurQuadCities.com Bishop Hill illuminates for St. Lucia OurQuadCities.com

Bishop Hill illuminates for St. Lucia

Bishop Hill will have a St. Lucia Celebration Friday and Saturday, Dec. 11 and 12, all day until 9 p.m. The celebration is in honor of one of the most popular Swedish holidays, Lucia Nights, a news release says. This Swedish tradition is based on a legend of Saint Lucia, Queen of Light. During a famine in Sweden, on the longest and darkest night of the year, it is said that Lucia appeared wearing a long white robe and encircling her head was a crown of candles. Legend has it that Lucia appeared on a ship laden with food. When the ship was unloaded, both it and Lucia vanished. Girls in Sweden wake their families on Dec. 13 carrying a tray of Lucia buns while dressed in a white robe and wearing a crown of candles. This holiday is also called the Festival of Lights. Businesses and restaurants will be open all day and into the evening hours. Around the village, each building will have a single candle in every window, and sidewalks will be illuminated with candles. The park Christmas tree will be lighted, and other holiday decorations will be on display. Visitors are asked to social-distance because of COVID-19. Businesses require masks indoors and have capacity limits. Because of the changing nature of the pandemic, there is the possibility that additional modifications might be made to the celebration, so visitors are encourage to check before visiting. For more information, call 309-927-3899, email bhha@mymctc.net, or visit www.visitbishophill.com. Information will also be posted on various Facebook pages including the Bishop Hill Heritage Association and the Bishop Hill Arts Council Facebook pages. St. Lucia Celebration events are sponsored, in part, by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency, a state agency

Quad-City Times Help sought in locating missing man Quad-City Times

Help sought in locating missing man

The Jones County Sheriff’s Office is asking the public’s help in locating a missing 39-year-old Davenport man.

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If This Happens to Your Hand Sanitizer, Throw it Away

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Muscatine schools will offer in-person learning again starting Monday

In an email to parents, school officials said they’re equipped to staff all schools.

Quad-City Times LeClaire hosts a hometown Christmas Quad-City Times

LeClaire hosts a hometown Christmas

It's Christmas this weekend in LeClaire with a variety of activities including Christmas lights, music, visits by Santa and Mrs. Claus plus many virtual activities.

WQAD.com Toys for Tots drive 2020 WQAD.com

Toys for Tots drive 2020

Toys for Tots drop-off locations were also at Mel-Foster and Olde Towne Roofing.

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Illinois officials report nearly 11,000 new coronavirus case, 192 deaths Thursday

IDPH noted some of the data may be delayed from the past holiday weekend.

OurQuadCities.com 172,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine expected in Iowa by end of 2020 OurQuadCities.com

172,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine expected in Iowa by end of 2020

JOHNSTON, IOWA -- The first doses of a COVID-19 vaccine are expected to arrive in the state of Iowa less than two weeks from now and more than 172,000 doses should be here by the end of the year. Governor Kim Reynolds and Kelly Garcia, Director of the Iowa Department of Human Services, announced an updated deployment plan for those thousands of doses in a Thursday news conference at Iowa Public Television's studios. Two vaccine makers, Pfizer and Moderna, are each awaiting emergency approval from the FDA to make the vaccine available. If the vaccines are approved, Reynolds says the state will receive an inital shipment of 26,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine during the week of December 13th. The following week, more doses of the Pfizer vaccine are expected along with an initial 54,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine. Another 95,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine would come the following week. In total, Governor Reynolds says 172,000 doses will be in Iowa by year end. The state is still finalizing its distribution plan with guidance from the federal government. Iowa health care workers and residents and employees of long term care facilities will be prioritized for the first round of inoculations. Both vaccines require two doses, taken 28 days apart. The Pfizer vaccine must be kept chilled at extreme cold temperatures of -70 degrees Celsius, according to the Governor. The state has already identified 39 locations around the state that can store the vaccine safely at that temperature. The Moderna vaccine does not require extreme cold storage. Garcia says the state will release additional guidance on its distribution plan on Friday. She says that by mid-2021 the state should have enough doses of the vaccine for anyone who wants it, however the initial doses will be targeted for the most at-risk populations. The Iowa Department of Public Health confirmed the deaths of another 70 Iowans from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours. The majority of those deaths occurred days or weeks ago and are just now being reported.

OurQuadCities.com 4 Your Money | Debt Diet OurQuadCities.com

4 Your Money | Debt Diet

As we continue to see a lot of soft economic data, there are some bright spots. Today David Nelson, President & CEO of NelsonCorp Wealth Management, joins us to explain what he is seeing and what he believes can be put in the positive column.  

WQAD.com Chasson Randle signs with OKC Thunder WQAD.com

Chasson Randle signs with OKC Thunder

This is the fifth NBA team for the former Rock Island High School standout.

Quad-City Times Sikh community slowly growing in the Quad-Cities Quad-City Times

Sikh community slowly growing in the Quad-Cities

Faith, family, community, servitude.

OurQuadCities.com Moline man's artworks featured in Geneseo studio OurQuadCities.com

Moline man's artworks featured in Geneseo studio

The Smith Studio and Gallery, in downtown Geneseo, will sponsor an exhibition of paintings by Brad Bisbey, of Moline, now through January. This is an exhibition of 18 figurative paintings that show the female form at times of contemplation, or when being involved with their environments, a news release says. Bisbey began drawing and painting at the age of 9 and decided early on to pursue a career in fine art … particularly painting. He graduated from St. Ambrose University with a bachelor's degree in art. He also studied with renowned portrait painter Daniel Greene in Chicago. An oil painter for many years, Bisbey developed an allergy to oil paint and solvents and began to use acrylics. Bisbey lives in the same house in Moline where he grew up. Hours at the Smith Studio and Gallery are 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; closed Sunday and Monday.

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Iowa officials report over 2,900 new coronavirus cases, 70 more deaths over 24 hours

The state now reported a total of 236,792 confirmed COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began.

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Niabi Zoo kicks off fundraising campaign to bring in new rhinos

This will be the first time Niabi Zoo has any rhinoceros species.

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Tyson adds scanners, dividers and clinics -- including one in Iowa

Tyson Foods, Inc. announced Thursday new protective steps to fight COVID-19, less than a month after a lawsuit was filed alleging a manager at a plant in Waterloo organized “a cash-buy-in, winner-take-all, betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager how many plant employees would test positive for COVID-19” while ordering employees to report to work. Tyson Foods suspended top managers at its largest pork plant November 19 and launched an investigation into allegations that they bet on how many workers would get infected during a widespread coronavirus outbreak. The company said in Thursday's news release it has invested $540 million to transform its U.S. facilities with protective measures, from walk-through temperature scanners and workstation dividers to social distance monitors and always-on testing, as well as provide additional team member pay and benefits. It is also working with outside health experts, expanding its health services staff, adding a chief medical officer position and also plans to pilot health clinics for team members and their families early next year. “We’ve learned a great deal during the pandemic and are implementing measures such as a new Covid-19 testing strategy, which are enabling us to move from defense to offense in our efforts to actively search for and fight the virus,” said Johanna Söderström, executive vice president & chief human resources officer for Tyson Foods. The pilot health clinics will be located in: Storm Lake, IowaCarthage/Center, TexasBerryville, ArkansasHolcomb, KansasLexington, NebraskaWilkesboro, North CarolinaNewbern, Tennessee Tyson is currently testing thousands of workers per week as part of its monitoring strategy. In addition to testing those with symptoms or who have been in close contact with someone who has the virus, the company is also proactively seeking to find the virus by testing workers who have no symptoms. “The new monitoring program we helped Tyson create is a science-first approach that’s really on the cutting edge of how workplaces can best mitigate the risk of the virus,” said Dr. Daniel Castillo, chief medical officer for Matrix Medical Network. “You’ll likely see many others adopt a similar approach in the coming months because it’s a process that looks both at people showing symptoms as well as those who do not.” Other measures include: Installing HEPA high-performance air filtration systems in some plant breakrooms to help reduce the reduce the risk of transmissionConducting continuous, daily cleaning at all facilities, and in some plants doing a nightly sanitizer fogging of high traffic areas such as break rooms, conference rooms, cafeteria and locker roomsInstalling more than 150 infrared temperature scanners in company facilitiesDesignating 150 social distancing monitors in company facilities to ensure company-provided daily personal protective equipment is properly worn and team members are following other best practices Tyson also has hired an additional 200 nurses and administrative staff this year, which means the company now has almost 600 medical professionals on staff. These medical professionals screen for symptoms, conduct testing and track cases to help and care for team members if they become ill.

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Galesburg firefighter injured after responding to house fire

The fire department says on of their firefighters fell through the ceiling while attempting to extinguish a house fire on Wednesday.

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Niabi Zoo launches southern white rhinos fundraising campaign

The Niabi Zoo is kicking off its fundraising campaign to bring southern white rhinos the Quad Cities community. “We are absolutely thrilled to be given the opportunity to bring such an iconic mega vertebrate to the Quad Cities Community, and play a real role in their ongoing conservation efforts,” said zoo Director Lee Jackson. “This will be the first time that this or any rhinoceros’ species will have been kept at Niabi, and we are beyond excited to be able to share these magnificent animals with our community. We hope to have the animals here by early summer of 2021, but there is still much to do in order to get ready. The rhinos new home will be in the existing Bactrian camel area. The camels will be moved to a new area of the zoo. We have to make extensive modifications to both the new rhino exhibit and the new Bactrian camel area, but we are confident that with the communities help we can get it done. We are looking to raise $100,000 and have already received some donations towards the project." In the early 1900s, there were fewer than 50 southern white rhinos left in existence. Today, thanks to conservation efforts in zoos and in the wild, the population now sits at about 18,000. Their cousins, the northern white rhino and western black rhino, became extinct in 2018 and 2011, respectively. To find out more visit www.niabizoo.com and look for the "donate" button.

OurQuadCities.com University of Iowa among hospitals fast-tracking nurses OurQuadCities.com

University of Iowa among hospitals fast-tracking nurses

U.S. hospitals slammed with COVID-19 patients -- including the University of Iowa -- are trying to lure nurses and doctors out of retirement, recruiting students and new graduates who have yet to earn their licenses and offering eye-popping salaries in a desperate bid to ease staffing shortages. With the virus surging from coast to coast, the number of patients in the hospital with the virus has more than doubled over the past month to a record high of nearly 100,000, pushing medical centers and health care workers to the breaking point. Nurses are increasingly burned out and getting sick on the job, and the stress on the nation's medical system prompted a dire warning from the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "The reality is December and January and February are going to be rough times. I actually believe they are going to be the most difficult time in the public health history of this nation," Dr. Robert Redfield said. Governors in hard-hit states like Wisconsin and Nebraska are making it easier for retired nurses to come back, including by waiving licensing requirements and fees, though it can be a tough sell for older nurses, who would be in more danger than many of their colleagues if they contracted the virus. Some are taking jobs that don't involve working directly with patients to free up front-line nurses, McMillan said. Iowa is allowing temporary, emergency licenses for new nurses who have met the state's educational requirements but haven't yet taken the state licensing exam. Some Minnesota hospitals are offering winter internships to nursing students to boost their staffs. The internships are typically offered in the summer but were canceled this year because of COVID-19. Methodist Hospital in Minneapolis will place 25 interns for one to two months to work with COVID-19 patients, though certain tasks will remain off-limits, such as inserting IVs or urinary catheters, said Tina Kvalheim, a nurse who runs the program. "They'll be fully supported in their roles so that our patients receive the best possible, safe care," Kvalheim said. Landon Brown, 21, of Des Moines, Iowa, a senior nursing student at Minnesota State University, Mankato, recently accepted an internship at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato. He was assigned to the pediatric unit's medical-surgical area but said he might come across patients with the coronavirus. Brown's resolve to help patients as a nurse was reaffirmed after his 90-year-old grandfather contracted the virus and died over the weekend."The staff that he had were great, and they really took a lot of pressure off of my folks and my family," he said. "I think that if I can be that for another family, that would be great." The University of Iowa's College of Nursing is also trying to get graduates into the workforce quickly. It worked to fast-track students' transcripts to the Iowa Board of Nursing so they could get licensed sooner upon graduating, said Anita Nicholson, associate dean for undergraduate programs. Nicholson said the college also scheduled senior internships earlier than normal and created a program that allows students to gain hospital experience under a nurse's supervision. Those students aren't caring for coronavirus patients, but their work frees up nurses to do so, Nicholson said. "The sooner we can get our graduates out and into the workforce, the better," she said. Across the U.S., hospitals are converting cafeterias, waiting rooms, even a parking garage to patient treatment areas. Some states are opening field hospitals. But that does nothing to ease the staffing shortage, especially in rural areas where officials say many people aren't taking basic precautions against the virus. Dr. Eli Perencevich, an epidemiology and internal medicine professor at the University of Iowa, said health care workers are paying the price for other people's refusal to wear masks. "It's sending everyone to war, really," he said. "We've decided as a society that we're going to take all the people in our health care system and pummel them because we have some insane idea about what freedom really is." Wausau, Wisconsin-based Aspirus Health Care is offering signing bonuses of up to $15,000 for nurses with a year of experience. Hospitals also are turning to nurses who travel from state to state. But that's expensive, because hospitals around the country are competing for them, driving salaries as high as $6,200 per week, according to postings for travel nursing jobs. April Hansen, executive vice president at San Diego-based Aya Healthcare, said there are now 31,000 openings for travel nurses, more than twice the number being sought when the pandemic surged in the spring. "It is crazy," Hansen said. "It doesn't matter if you are rural or urban, if you are an Indian health facility or an academic medical center or anything in between. … All facilities are experiencing increased demand right now." Nurses who work in intensive care and on medical-surgical floors are the most in demand. Employers also are willing to pay extra for nurses who can show up on short notice and work 48 or 60 hours per week instead of the standard 36. Laura Cutolo, a 32-year-old emergency room and ICU nurse from Gilbert, Arizona, began travel nursing when the pandemic began, landing in New York during the deadliest stretch of the U.S. outbreak last spring. She is now working in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and soon will return to New York. She said she hopes her work will be an example to her children, now 2 and 5, when the crisis passes into history and they read about it someday. "If they ask me, 'Where were you?' I can be proud of where I was and what I did," Cutolo said.Doctors are in demand, too. "I don't even practice anymore, and I've gotten lots of emails asking me to travel across the country to work in ERs," said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. The outbreak in the U.S. is blamed for more than 270,000 deaths and 13.8 million confirmed infections. New cases are running at over 160,000 a day on average, and deaths are up to more than 1,500 a day, a level seen back in May, during the crisis in the New York City area. Several states reported huge numbers of new cases Wednesday, including a combined 40,000 in California, Illinois and Florida alone. States are seeing record-breaking surges in deaths, including Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky in the middle of the country. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said the virus is "spreading like wildfire." A COVID-19 vaccine is expected to become available in a few weeks, and health care workers are likely to be given priority for the first shots. That could make it easier for hospitals to recruit help.To make room for the sickest, hard-hit institutions are sending home some COVID-19 patients who otherwise would have been kept in the hospital. They are also canceling elective surgeries or sending adult non-COVID-19 patients to pediatric hospitals. A hospital system in Idaho is sending some COVID-19 patients home with iPads, supplemental oxygen, blood pressure cuffs and oxygen monitors so they can finish recovering in their own beds. The computer tablets enable nurses to check in with them, and the oxygen monitors automatically send back vital information. Forliti reported from Minneapolis. Associated Press writers Tammy Webber in Fenton, Michigan; Heather Hollingsworth in Mission, Kansas; Brian Witte in Annapolis, Maryland; John O'Connor in Springfield, Illinois; and Ken Kusmer in Indianapolis contributed to this story. Follow Grant Schulte on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GrantSchulte

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Hy-Vee Launches New Plus Premium Membership

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WVIK As Climate Change Destroys their Habitats, These Animals Are on the Move WVIK

As Climate Change Destroys their Habitats, These Animals Are on the Move

As natural disasters continue to batter America’s coasts and devastate crops, animals are in danger of losing their natural habitats. But there is hope — land on the banks of the Mississippi river is acting as a sanctuary for animals fleeing the effects of climate change. On the Illinois side of Lock and Dam 13, Ayers Sand Prairie State Nature Preserve is just one of many stops along what scientists are calling “Natural Highways.” They’re stretches of diverse landscapes resilient to climate change, and the Nature Conservancy has mapped where they connect across the contiguous United States.

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Health officials expect COVID-19 vaccines in the Quad Cities very soon

Local health officials expect COVID-19 vaccines to be in the Quad Cities December 2020.

Quad-City Times Q-C realtors ring for Salvation Army rescue Christmas campaign Quad-City Times

Q-C realtors ring for Salvation Army rescue Christmas campaign

Quad-City area realtors will ring the bells at five Hy-Vee stores Friday, December 4, as part of the annual Realtors Ring Day.

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Quad City area police share tips on how to avoid scams this holiday season

Blue Grass, Colona and Davenport police notified residents about recent scams.

OurQuadCities.com Eating healthy this holiday season OurQuadCities.com

Eating healthy this holiday season

The holiday months means more people are likely eating more food and it can be harder to watch what we eat. Teresa Pangan, a nutritionist for UnityPoint Health – Trinity said to try and stick with your eating routine as much as possible. Since people are spending more time in the house, she recommends clearing off the counters and only having healthy food in eyesight. Also, an easy change could be just using a smaller plate. "Half what you have on your plate in half, just kind of scoot it over and eat that half and then pause and ask how hungry am I? Am I still hungry? I'm still hungry okay then half that and eat half of that and keep going halves until you're just full. It will slow you down and help you pay attention," Pangan said. She recommends slowing down your eating by putting your utensil down or taking a sip of a drink in between each bite.

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Dubuque nursing home reports first possible COVID-19 reinfection case in the county

A resident at Sunnycrest Manor has tested positive for COVID-19 twice in two months.

WVIK Good Morning from WVIK News for Thursday, December 3, 2020 WVIK

Good Morning from WVIK News for Thursday, December 3, 2020

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Rick's Six: COVID-19 cases rise dramatically in Q-C, muffler ordinance, and new pop-up bar

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Marx

This is Roald Tweet on Rock Island. We Rock Islanders like to think of ourselves as the heart of the heart of the country. How do you think we might have reacted way back in 1886 to an English citizen coming to lecture us on how to run our American government? And then suppose that the lecture is an attack on capitalism and a defense of socialism. And that the lecturer is a woman. And not just any woman, but the daughter of the already infamous Karl Marx.

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Our earliest sunsets of the year occur over the next week and a half

We are now in the midst of our earliest sunsets stretch in the QCA. The sun will go down at 4:32PM for the next several days. Yes the days are still getting shorter, but that will be because the latest sunrise doesn’t occur until after Christmas.

WQAD.com Quad Cities theater owner creates video to support other area live-event venues WQAD.com

Quad Cities theater owner creates video to support other area live-event venues

Driving along I-74 and in downtown Moline, you won't miss the color coming from the Spotlight. But, you might miss what used to be happening inside.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Births for Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY MOLINE

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Iowa Congressional candidate Rita Hart files US House appeal over 6-vote loss

Iowa Second Congressional District candidate Rita Hart plans to appeal Monday’s certified election results to the Democratic-controlled U.S. House, according to a statement by her campaign.

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2020

OurQuadCities.com Missed out on Toys for Tots but still want to donate? Here's how OurQuadCities.com

Missed out on Toys for Tots but still want to donate? Here's how

A new toy can make a world of a difference for kids during the holidays. The U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots program tries to make sure kids don't go without Christmas. Local 4 News joined that effort Wednesday, collecting toys at Blain's Farm and Fleet in Moline. More than 4,000 toys have been donated around the Quad Cities so far. That's down from the 25,000 toys usually collected. There was no shortage of generosity at Wednesday's event, though. Local 4's Jim Niedelman says, while he was out there, a man handed him $1,000 to drop in the donation box. Local 4's Mikhayla Hughes-Shaw reported from the event, where she says "there is still a lot more to give." If you weren't able to make it out to Toys for Tots and still want to donate, visit the Quad Cities Toys for Tots website.

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New management at Snowstar is preparing for a big season

New management at Snowstar in Andalusia is preparing for a big year at the slopes.

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City of Moline to offer additional funding to small businesses

Moline City Council is offering forgivable loans to small businesses in the city.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Lottery numbers drawn Wednesday

ILLINOIS LOTTERY

QCOnline.com QCOnline.com

Lottery numbers drawn Wednesday

ILLINOIS LOTTERY

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Two people arrested for drug charges in Warren Co.

The Warren County Sheriff's Office, alongside U.S. Marshals and an FBI Task Force, recently arrested two people on drug charges in Little York, IL

OurQuadCities.com Police need help identifying man who dragged, beat pit bull puppy outside of local animal shelter OurQuadCities.com

Police need help identifying man who dragged, beat pit bull puppy outside of local animal shelter

Knox County Humane Society has seen a good year with around 900 adoptions of cats and dogs — a lot of them being contactless adoptions. Future pet owners can look for a pet without stepping inside the shelter, but they also have a problem. Earlier this week, a man was caught on camera beating a pit bull puppy. "It was a man out there who was bringing in a dog, and he was pretty much not the nicest person in the world," said Knox County Humane Society Director Erin Buckmaster. "And I would like to say that terriers or pit bulls are one of the nicest dogs that we have, except it's the bad people that cause the problem." They say the female puppy was not injured but is just scared of male figures. Shelters are often overrun with pit bulls who were mistreated, and shelters are calling for stronger laws on what these breeders can do. "The protection for the dogs is, I mean, it's there. It's just not bolded out," said Josh, who also works at the shelter. "People aren't really listening to it. They could care less. They can just go get another dog from a different state or different county." The Knox County Humane Society on average sees three incidents a month where dogs are brought in after being abused, or by breeders who have no further use for the dog. "It just the irresponsibility, you know." said Josh. "It's a lot of human error that you got to blame it on because, a lot of these dogs... They can't choose their lives. They're in it." The shelter doesn't have a timetable for the puppy's adoption yet. The Knox County Humane Society needs help identifying the man in the video.

OurQuadCities.com Funeral home adapts to IL mitigations with unique funeral services OurQuadCities.com

Funeral home adapts to IL mitigations with unique funeral services

A local funeral home is finding ways to adapt to the mitigations in Illinois which only currently allow 10 people to attend funerals.  Wheelan Pressly Funeral Home in Rock Island is utilizing live video-stream options for services,  which allows more people to pay their respects. Drive-by funeral services are also a popular alternative. Joseph Perez, Vice President and co-owner, said they've had to get creative. "This Saturday, we have a live-stream visitation at the funeral home where people can drive by and express their sympathies to the family, and then this family is actually going to live stream the funeral to outside projectors and encourage people to park in their vehicles, watch it on the projectors and tune into a certain radio station,” he said. They plan to continue using the live video-stream service after the pandemic. 

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Multiple closures around I-74 bridge Thursday

Lane and exit closures will begin Thursday morning and should wrap by mid-afternoon.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Davenport aldermen to take another stab at muffler ordinance after concerns raised

Davenport aldermen will take another stab at amending a city ordinance aimed at combating noisy mufflers keeping residents awake at night.

OurQuadCities.com IL Quad Cities bars and restaurants struggling one month after resurgence mitigations OurQuadCities.com

IL Quad Cities bars and restaurants struggling one month after resurgence mitigations

Struggling bars and restaurants in Illinois are finding ways to survive in the pandemic. That's the case a month after Governor J.B. Pritzker imposed Tier 3 mitigations in early November for our region, which shut down indoor business for restaurant dining rooms and bars. Lauri Mcnamee, the owner of VIP’s Bar and Grill in downtown Moline said they are on the brink of closing. “It's very hard. We have hardly any business at all at this point,” she said.  The business started a delivery service alongside carry-out, but Mcnamee is not sure it will carry them through the winter months.  “If [business] does not pick up, we are planning to make some future arrangements of closing all together,” she said.  The longtime business owner said she has never had a year like this one.  “We've gone through some battles before, but we always come out on top. This one we are just praying that we can make it through. Us and everybody,” she said.  The Daiquiri Factory in downtown Rock Island cut its staff from 15 to 2 employees. Owner Kyle Peters said they are finding new ways to keep their doors open with daiquiris to go that can be ordered online starting next week.  “[It] is definitely going to be huge for us in moving forward and staying relevant during this crippling time,” he said.  He knows his business is just one of many that are currently struggling.  “It's not just us, it's everybody. No one is really crushing it so, it's kind of just like, join the club. We're all here. We're all kind of in this together really,” Peters said.    He said they will feature 6 flavors of daiquiris each week, and they are using the down time to create more flavors.  Governor J.B. Pritzker said the mitigations will be in place for at least a few more weeks.

OurQuadCities.com Galesburg District 205 Board of Education approve the second phase  for the Galesburg High School project OurQuadCities.com

Galesburg District 205 Board of Education approve the second phase for the Galesburg High School project

This week the Galesburg District 205 Board of Education approved the second phase of construction bids for the Galesburg High School project. The project was made possible after the district took several bonds to start on the project. The first phase of the project focused on the kitchen in the building and the second phase is considered to be the biggest part of the project. The total project of the high school is roughly $43 million and phase two is set to be $26 million.According to the District Superintendent Dr. John Asplund the project will be completed by the end of next year. "So we're trying to be very aggressive so that by next August we should have use of most of the building and then by December then the idea is to be full completion so a year from now we're hoping to be full completion of that facility," said Dr. Asplund. Once the project is finished about 1,800 students will be enjoying the new campus. "It'll be adding to the north end of the building for a 10th to 12th academic wing and then a full remodel of the existing building the office the classroom everything basically but the gym," said Dr. Asplund. The biggest change will be for current 7th and 8th graders since they will become students at Galesburg High School, Dr. Asplund said this will be beneficial for their education. "We've also found that there's a lot of advantages to having a 7th through 12th in term of efficiency in terms of academic enrichment in terms of academic support we feel like this is a lot better for our students over all when they get in that 7th through 12th facility," said Dr. Asplund. Angelica Mangieri is a parent in the district who believes the change will be great for younger students. "To understand what expected of them in high school to know homework demands and the classroom demands and just kinda a new routine that they have to learn to be a better student," said Mangieri. Her son Giovanni is a freshman at Galesburg High School and has been doing remote learning due to the pandemic. He said he's excited to see what his high school will look like when he goes back. "I am looking forward to finally be in there and experience high school life cause I haven't been able to do that because of that pandemic," said Mangieri. Phase three of the project will begin in February, that will include an addition to another band and choir room and a full remodel of the auditorium.

OurQuadCities.com Community center in Rock Island still giving gifts to children in need this holiday season OurQuadCities.com

Community center in Rock Island still giving gifts to children in need this holiday season

The Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center is getting into the holiday spirit with big plans for area kids — of course, differently this year due to the pandemic. Executive Director Jerry Jones spoke to Local 4's Ann Sterling via Zoom Wednesday with details.

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Escaped pet wallaroo leads first responders on two-hour chase

The kangaroo/wallaby mix evaded police, firefighters, and city employees in along chase before it dove into the Illinois River.

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30 years ago: BLIZZARD!

A blizzard moved through the QCA 30 years ago December 2nd and 3rd 1990.

OurQuadCities.com Crews respond to rollover crash in Davenport OurQuadCities.com

Crews respond to rollover crash in Davenport

A major road was blocked off to traffic early Wednesday evening in Davenport due to a rollover crash. Crews responded to the area of E. 53rd Street, just east of Tremont Avenue, around 5 p.m. Local 4 News arrived as the first and only station on the scene, where the intersection of E. 53rd Street and Tremont Avenue was closed as crews waited for the vehicle to be towed. There is no word on injuries at this time. This is a developing story. Stay tuned to Local 4 News, Fox 18 News and OurQuadCities.com for updates. Got a news tip? Forward it to Local 4 on Twitter or Facebook or download our app on your iPhone or Android phone. 

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Muscatine nursing home creates “Heart to Heart Hut” for residents to visit through

A care facility in Muscatine is making the pandemic a little easier on their residents.

OurQuadCities.com Wave of donations in Moline helping to meet Toys for Tots' growing need OurQuadCities.com

Wave of donations in Moline helping to meet Toys for Tots' growing need

The pandemic is ensuring Christmas isn't the same, but kindness from families is making sure it's still special. For Toys for Tots this year, there's more applicants to receive toys, and less donations so far than year's past. Local 4 joined in the cause at Blaine's Farm and Fleet in Moline. A Moline couple and Marine captain tell us, how it's impacting the lives of kids.

WQAD.com Wally WQAD.com

Wally

Wally Peru chase

WQAD.com Escaped pet wallaroo leads first responders on two-hour chase WQAD.com

Escaped pet wallaroo leads first responders on two-hour chase

The kangaroo/wallaby mixed evaded police, firefighters, and city employees in along chase before it dove into the Illinois River.

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Clinton County Sheriff's Office warns of work-from-home scam involving fake checks after local man targeted

Nearly 400 fake checks worth about $903,000 total were sent out to people across the country.

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Hy-Vee announces new plus premium membership

The new membership is $99 a year.

OurQuadCities.com Wanted: Have you seen these fugitives? OurQuadCities.com

Wanted: Have you seen these fugitives?

Crime Stoppers of the Quad Cities wants your help catching two fugitives.  It’s a Local 4 News exclusive.  You can get an elevated reward for information on this week’s cases. Michael Kelsey, 33, also known as Michael Hernandez, is 6-foot-4 and 245 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes. Kelsey is wanted by the Rock Island Police Department for failure to register as a sex offender. Angela Almanza, 22, is 5-foot-4 and 128 pounds with blonde hair and blue eyes Almanza is wanted in Rock Island County for a probation violation on original charges of possession of a controlled substance and possession of methamphetamine. You have a week to contact police for an elevated reward. Call the tip line at 309-762-9500. All tips are anonymous.

WQAD.com Clinton County Sheriff's Office warns of work-from-home scam involving fake checks after local man targeted WQAD.com

Clinton County Sheriff's Office warns of work-from-home scam involving fake checks after local man targeted

Nearly 400 fake checks worth about $903,000 total were sent out to people across the country.