QCA.news - Quad Cities news and view from both sides of the river

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

WQAD.com Davenport Police search for stolen pieces of a veterans’ memorial WQAD.com

Davenport Police search for stolen pieces of a veterans’ memorial

DAVENPORT, Iowa-- Police are asking for help identifying the person who stole pieces of a veterans’ memorial in Davenport. Police say the aluminum pieces missing are from a memorial bridge over the I-74 bridge just south of the Rhythm City Casino. Police say several aluminum panels and support posts were taken over the past several weeks. The bridge is etched with the American Flag to honor men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice. Anyone with information should call the Davenport Police Department.

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

WQAD.com Judge Brett Kavanugh’s alleged sexual assault accuser has until Friday to testify WQAD.com

Judge Brett Kavanugh’s alleged sexual assault accuser has until Friday to testify

WASHINGTON, D.C.-- The Senate Judiciary Committee must decide who to believe, Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh or Dr. Christine Ford, who says he attacked her at a high school party about 30 years ago. Ford’s attorney says he client will not testify against Judge Kavanaugh until a full FBI investigation is complete. “Where I’m focused right now is doing everything we can to make Dr Ford comfortable with coming before a committee, in a open session or a closed session, in public or a private interview,” says Iowa Senator Charles Grassley, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee. Dr. Ford says she sent a letter about Judge Kavanaugh’s alleged behavior to democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein back in July, but nothing was done. “Dr. Ford said I want to put this letter in the record, but I don’t want my identity disclosed. This has to be done privately so Senator Feinstein was in an impossible position,” says Senator Richard Durbin. Sen. Grassley says he’ll give Judge Brett Kavanugh’s accuser until the end of the week to decide her next move.  

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The Latest: Wisconsin workplace shooter dead, shot by police

The attack that occurred Wednesday morning at software company in Middleton.

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'Sesame Street' wants to clarify: Bert and Ernie aren't gay

The producers of "Sesame Street" want you to know that Bert and Ernie are not, in fact, gay.

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Iowa high court hears arguments in police stop case

The Iowa Supreme Court will determine whether the police practice of using minor infractions as a pretext for stopping drivers they suspect of more serious crimes violates the Iowa Constitution in a case that civil liberty groups say has implications for police racial profiling.

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Davenport police seek Veterans Memorial Parkway aluminum panel thieves

Davenport police are seeking public assistance in identifying thieves who stole aluminum panels from the bridge in the 4600 block of Veterans Memorial Parkway.

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Former Director of Child Food Program Pleads Guilty to Defrauding USDA

A Silvis woman and former operations director for the Quad Cities Area Children’s Food Program has pled guilty to fraud and filing a false tax return.

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UPDATE: Moline Police Captains to return to force before possible discipline

The Moline police chief was pulled over on Sept. 7, 2018, in Scott County.

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Muscatine Police respond to Tuesday night fight and stabbing

A Muscatine man was arrested and charged with Willful Injury causing serious injury and Rioting after a fight and stabbing.

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Man accused of killing ISU student had lengthy criminal history

TV9 has gone through court documents from 15 court cases involving Collin Richards dating back to 2014, many of them connected to violent crimes.

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Ceremonial Arsenal cannon fire causes confusion in Davenport, Bettendorf

13-gun salute performed at Rock Island Arsenal

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Joey's Hope to Find a New Heart

The KWQC family shares the story of Producer Briann Decker's son Joey, as he hopes to find a heart transplant.

OurQuadCities.com Common concern on both sides of the river: The QC needs more affordable housing OurQuadCities.com

Common concern on both sides of the river: The QC needs more affordable housing

There's a lack of affordable housing in the Quad Cities.A 2013 study by the University of Iowa indicates that rent has become increasingly unaffordable in the Quad Cities, with Scott County alone carrying the second highest foreclosure rate in the state. Now, Rock Island, Davenport and Moline teaming up to conduct a new study to reexamine the issue. The study is a requirement every five years for certain block grant funding that the three cities receive form the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  The results will be published in a study this spring.The second of three meetings was held Wednesday night.One concern is simply the lack of affordable homes available for people with limited incomes. Local 4 News did some research.A 2015 Davenport study found that nearly half of all households in the city are low to moderate income and the lower your income, the more housing problems you tend to have.That includes not having proper plumbing nd paying so much for rent that you can't afford other things like food and clothing. One woman says she just moved to Davenport from San Diego, where she saw similar problems. She says affordable housing has become a national issue and that officials in the Quad Cities need to tackle it now before it results in higher rates of homelessness. "I don't see the homelessness in the huge numbers in tents on the streets and that but I see a different kind of poverty and I think sometimes when I drive through these neighborhoods and the houses are rundown. And if you take it a step further it's very likely they just can't afford the upkeep," says Jennifer Porter.Numbers from HUD presented by consultants at Wednesday night's meeting also indicate some racial disparity when it comes to housing issues. Nearly 50% of the black population and 40-45% of Hispanics in both Davenport and Rock Island have housing needs, compared to just 25-30% of white neighbors who need housing help.  If you've experienced problems with housing, you can still voice your concerns at the final meeting on Thursday at the Esperanza Center in Moline.For for information and to take the survey online, click here.  

OurQuadCities.com Family Fun Day at MLK Jr. Center brings community together with food, parade, games OurQuadCities.com

Family Fun Day at MLK Jr. Center brings community together with food, parade, games

It's a decades-old tradition that's designed to create a block party vibe in Rock Island. Jerry Jones, executive director of the the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center, joins Local 4 News to talk about that event. Bonnie Jacobs also joins the show, who's been helping to plan the parade portion of the activities.

OurQuadCities.com Overflow of offenders leaves Scott County out of space and out thousands OurQuadCities.com

Overflow of offenders leaves Scott County out of space and out thousands

With the increase in juvenile crime comes the inevitable increase in young offenders. Add that to the list of adults, and Scott County has found themselves with an overflow of offenders and not enough space to house them all. "The Juvenile Detention Center is overpopulated, it has completely overgrown its capacity," said Scott County Sheriff Tim Lane. On Tuesday night the Scott County Sheriff's Office and the Scott County Juvenile Detention Center proposed a study to the Board of Supervisors that would assess the county's housing issues. Right now the Juvenile Detention Center has 16 units available to house juvenile offenders. But Lane says at the rate juveniles crimes are climbing, it's not nearly enough. As a result, Scott County is forced to outsource, sending juveniles to detention centers across Iowa."The problem that we have with that is that is very expensive," said Lane. "And our costs from doing that have gone from zero to last year over $177,000. And at this point in time, we are doubling last year's pace. So we have to do something."But the Juvenile Detention Center isn't the only facility struggling for space. The Scott County Jail is crowded too. On Wednesday, Lane sat down with Local 4 News to take a closer look at just how big this issue is. Lane says while the jail currently has 363 beds, that actually leaves them with around 300. "We have not completely outgrown the Scott County jail," said Lane. "The problem that we have is that the construction of the jail limits some of our ability to use it. That's because there are different classifications of inmates that just can't be together."Just looking at Wednesday's daily inmate count, Scott County is currently housing 307 total inmates within the county."Our ability to use every bed in that jail is limited, and if we can change some of the construction in the jail and have more flexible housing and more multi-use housing, hopefully we can use more of the jail the taxpayers invested in years ago," said Lane. That inmate total does not include the 28 inmates of all ages currently being housed outside Scott County, across four different counties. But Lane says housing the juveniles at other facilities takes the biggest chunk out of the budget right now. The Mary Davis Home in Knox County is one of the detention centers housing the overflow of young offenders from Scott County, and each day is costly."It's a $125 per day, per diem," said the Superintendent of Mary Davis Home, Wendi Steck. That's just for one juvenile at Mary Davis Home specifically. Lane says the cost varies case by case, but the total currently adds up to nearly $1,000 a day. In the fiscal year 2018, Scott County spent $177,200 in housing juveniles at outside facilities. For the fiscal year 2019, the county budgeted $120,000, but Lane says with the increasing rate of juvenile crimes, that won't be enough. But funding isn't the only problem when it comes to housing juveniles in other facilities. "You're also talking Sheriff's officers off to transport the kids back and forth to court dates and back and forth from here," said Steck. And keeping young offenders under the same roof poses problems too. "They know each other," said Speck. "So there's often issues between different gangs, or they don't get along, or they get along too well."Mary Davis Home is a 39-bed facility. But Speck says Scott County isn't the only one filling up fast. "We've seen an influx in kids in the last year, that we haven't seen over the last couple years," said Speck. So these past couple months we haven't been able to take too many Scott County kids because we are full with our own."Which is why Lane says they need to find a solution soon. "That is my number one concern when it comes to juvenile crime is that if this crime wave starts to spread out, there's going to be a need in other jurisdictions in order to find space for juveniles," said Lane. "And that means that Scott County would end up on the waiting list, and we would end up having no choice but to turn juvenile offenders free no matter what their crime is if it is less than a forcible felony."With the proposed study, the county would look at populations within the jails, reconstructing the current facilities for multi-use space, flexible housing, and the possibility of additional facilities. "We have to do something fairly quickly before costs become way too substantial to bare when we could look at the option of a brick and mortar facility that will actually, in the long-term, save taxpayer money," said Lane. The Scott County Board of Supervisors is expected to vote on the proposed study Thursday night. 

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Coal Valley to pursue $250,000 in grants

COAL VALLEY — Two grants to be pursued by the village could bring in $250,000 toward safer schools and a proposed dog park.

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Joey's Hope to Find a New Heart

The KWQC family shares the story of Producer Briann Decker's son Joey, as he hopes to find a heart transplant.

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Mysterious booming noises reported in Davenport

Police investigate “loud booms” complaint

WQAD.com Almon Incorporated expands in Quad Cities WQAD.com

Almon Incorporated expands in Quad Cities

QUAD CITIES, Ill,- Almon Incorporated, the technical communications company is expanding into the Quad Cities. It's opened a new location in Milan just south of Interstate-280. The company specializes in making operator and technical manuals and videos for companies like John Deere and General Motors. Company leaders say they saw an increase in business and wanted to expand close to their east Moline location.  

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Vigil will honor Iowa State athlete killed while golfing

AMES, Iowa (AP) — A vigil is planned to remember an Iowa State University student-athlete who was killed this week while playing golf on a course near the college campus in Ames. Celia Barquin Arozamena, a 22-year-old engineering student from Spain, was the Big 12 women’s golf champion this year. The vigil will be Wednesday evening. Barquin’s body was found Monday near the ninth hole at Coldwater Golf Links in Ames. Soon after, police charged a homeless man who had been camping nearby with murder in her death. All are invited to the vigil at a green space just north of the university’s Campanile. Friends will have a chance to share memories about Barquin and write messages to her family in Spain.

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Muscatine Police respond to Tuesday night fight and stabbing

A Muscatine man was arrested and charged with Willful Injury causing serious injury and Rioting after a fight and stabbing.

WQAD.com “Fine help yourself” – Family fights Iowa mental health system for 10 years WQAD.com

“Fine help yourself” – Family fights Iowa mental health system for 10 years

CLINTON, Iowa -- Gracie Nelson has a binder filled with her family's struggles from the past 10 years. The documents that don't fit in the binder go into one of several crates stashed underneath her living room coffee table. Collectively, these papers represent years doctors' notes, rejection letters, and other records all in an effort to get her son, Tyler, the mental health treatment he needs. Yet, Gracie said the system that was designed to help them has fallen short. Some of Gracie's frustration is with Iowa as a whole. Some of it is more specifically with Clinton County. This case is complicated, but between the state's Medicaid program and the county's Department of Human Services office and the County Attorney's Office, the Nelsons have fallen through the cracks. Mental health is a tricky subject. Some mental health facilities won't take some people depending on the severity of the diagnosis. Other facilities need special court orders. Ultimately, it comes down to finding the best place for the child and finding the money for that treatment. Tyler Nelson "He held the knife to my throat," Gracie said. "At that point, I knew I was seriously in trouble." Gracie was held at knife-point by her own 15-year-old step-son, Tyler. Last year, he threatened to rape and kill her. He injured her other children, and he tortured the family dog. Now, the family fears they will have to try to live through this again. Tyler is a child with an illness. He's not a monster. According to Dr. Thomas Millard at the Cornerstone Wellness Center, Tyler suffers from multiple mental health disorders stemming from birth. Among these are Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Paraphilic Disorder and Conduct Disorder with severe sexual aggression toward others. Dr. Devin Borgman at Life Connections also said Tyler suffers from Conduct Disorder and sexual aggression. When Gracie married Aaron 10 years ago, all they knew was his Autism diagnosis. However, things really changed in 2012. "One day he just decided he was going to take me out physically," Gracie said. "He owned me, he could do whatever he wanted to me... he raised his fist to me." Tyler was sent to Tanager Place, a Psychiatric Medical Institute for Children (PMIC), in Cedar Rapids in 2013. However, Gracie said the government-funded institution does not handle severe cases, and Tyler was able to slide through the system. "He got discharged in August in 2015, and October 15 is when he told his doctor he wanted to slit my throat," Gracie said. Aaron Nelson, Tyler's father, said they just want to get him the help he needs. "I love my son," Aaron said. "I want to get him help, but at the same point, I have to protect society from him as well because he's going to hurt someone if he's not treated properly." Finding the right mental health facility After Tyler was discharged from Tanager Place, few facilities would even accept him. Although the Nelsons have searched for the proper place for Tyler, they have been rejected from almost every facility. Boys and Girls Home Residential Treatment Centers, Inc., wrote, "Since he has already been in a PMIC before, I do not believe he would benefit much more from our program." Tanager Place denied a second admittance, saying "Due to his ongoing sexualized behaviors, it appears he is in need of a program specializing in that area of treatment." Another PMIC, Orchard Place in Des Moines, recommended The STOP Program or Woodward Academy. Those places, along with Tyler's current housing at Piney Ridge in Waynesville, Missouri, all specialize in Sexually Aggressive Youth (SAY) programs. Medicaid Tyler's SAY treatment at Piney Ridge used to be covered by AmeriHealth, one of Iowa's three Medicaid providers. When AmeriHealth left Iowa in 2017, Tyler's treatment was rolled into another provider, Amerigroup. His needs were re-assessed by the new company, and funding stopped in late June 2018. It was either bring Tyler home, where he was an active threat to his family or get charged for child abandonment in Missouri. "Amerigroup's language would be that they look at medical necessity," Paul Smith, director of Piney Ridge, said. "Depending on how SAY issues are represented, it may or may not meet what they use to consider a medical necessity for psychiatric treatment." Most SAY programs require private pay or state backing. Tyler had state backing with AmeriHealth, but now that Amerigroup is representing him, he doesn't qualify. Even though the Nelson family has private insurance, these institutions want the money up front or mandated money from the state. We tried talking to Amerigroup through several calls and emails, but the company has not returned any questions. After a few harrowing days, Amerigroup decided to fund Tyler temporarily. The Nelsons are still unsure if Amerigroup will continue to help or suddenly drop them. On a middle-class income, the Nelson's only have one option - they need state help. Iowa Department of Human Services "We've literally had DHS tell us that the only way they're going to help us is if my wife is in a hospital or in a body bag," Aaron Nelson said. One way to get state-backed funding is having the Department of Human Services (DHS) to take the case in front of a judge. If the judge says yes, then Amerigroup would have to help pay, and a place like Piney Ridge would keep Tyler. In order to decide if a case should be taken to a judge, the DHS files a Child in Need of Assistance (CINA) report. There are several ways that a CINA could be approved, all of which are found in Iowa code chapter 232.2, section 6. Three of these include: Who is in need of medical treatment to cure, alleviate, or prevent serious physical injury, or illness and whose parent, guardian, or custodian is unwilling or unable to provide such treatment. Who is in need of treatment to cure or alleviate serious mental illness or disorder, or emotional damage as evidenced by severe anxiety, depression, withdrawal, or untoward aggressive behavior toward self or others and whose parent, guardian, or custodian is unwilling to provide such treatment. Whose parent, guardian, or other custodian for good cause desires to be relieved of the child’s care and custody. First, let's unpack the circumstances. In the first case, a family would need to prove the possibility of "serious physical injury." Dr. Thomas Millard, a psychologist at Cornerstone Wellness Center in Clinton, wrote in a report, "In my opinion, [Gracie] is at risk for an attempted homicide or rape by Tyler." The second case talks about "serious mental illness," which has already been established by Dr. Millard as well as the rejection letters from mental health facilities. Although the Nelsons are not "unwilling," they are "unable" based on the level of payment required and the necessity of having state-backed funding. The second case does not include the word "unable," so it is possible the code only allows for "unwilling" parents for mental health issues. Finally, the third case has been made apparent by Dr. Millard's report. "It is inexplicable to me that since that since that time he has not been placed for a long-term treatment," his report states. "It is imperative that all caretakers, agencies and other professionals working with TJ understand that failure to provide intensive residential treatment for him is putting Gracie, and potentially others, in danger." Matt Highland, public information officer for the Iowa DHS, was unable to talk about this code. He forwarded us to Vern Armstrong, division administrator of field operations. "CINAs are usually for child abuse. Kids who need treatment," Armstrong said. In response to a child's on-going mental health issue, he said "We've used a CINA as a last resort." Nonetheless, the code shows circumstances in which a child would need assistance due to their own mental health issues or violent tendencies. The Nelsons have attempted a CINA with the Clinton County DHS twice. The first time, they were rejected over the phone. According to the Nelsons, the caseworker, Melissa Housenga, told them because they were parents, they couldn't be victims. A second attempt led to a home visit from Grace Oldsen, another caseworker. The Nelsons said Oldsen told them it was typical adolescent behavior, and from what Gracie said, "that I should just buck up or leave." "She actually looked at me and said I should choose between my wife and my son," Aaron Nelson said. The CINA was denied a second time, even though they meet three possible criteria. When they finally got assigned to the Scott County office after intervention from the Iowa Attorney General's Office, their case was immediately processed. "It doesn't necessarily happen very often," Armstrong said about switching DHS county offices. Clinton County Attorney's Office According to state code, the county attorney does not have to be involved in a case like this. Chapter 232.87, section 2, states, " A petition may be filed by the department of human services, juvenile court officer, or county attorney." "(Every interaction) has been negative," Gracie said. "Fine help yourself. You have insurance. Period." The Clinton County Attorney is Mike Wolf, and the assistant attorney, who the Nelsons have spoken most with, is Cheryl Newport. Newport did not comment when contacted, and Mike Wolf responded: "out of respect." "I can't acknowledge that such a case even exists," Wolf said. "It's too dangerous to talk about anything." After several attempts, the Nelsons contacted the Iowa Attorney General's Office. They will have a representative process their case. "I would say it's relatively rare," Armstrong said about getting the attorney general involved in a county issue. What the family faces now After a decade of increasing danger and little assistance, a hearing is finally set for September 20. The Nelson's case has moved forward, but only after working with a DHS office outside of their county and the state's attorney general office. "I didn't file the CINA so I could get rid of a bratty kid," Gracie said. "we're not trying to pass him off on someone else and make them their problem. He needs long-term care." The hearing will determine if the Tyler gets that care or will have to come home.

OurQuadCities.com Opioid bill could end extended waits at UnityPoint Health OurQuadCities.com

Opioid bill could end extended waits at UnityPoint Health

An $8.4 billion bill that would help fight the opioid epidemic has brought Senator Dick Durbin and Representative Cheri Bustos to the Quad Cities.The bill would better support children who have gone through trauma as well as improving screenings for fentynal in the mail. It would also enhance treatment for patients.  They visited UnityPoint Health today where some say they've waited in long lines for mental health assistance.A UnityPoint Health behavioral specialist says that money could help end extended waits. "With this funding, the lag time is almost nill. It's been reduced quite a bit. So now instead of being turned away or told to wait, they're able to get in faster, " says behavioral professional, Charles Harris.Both the House and Senate have passed opioid bills. The Senate approved the bill in a 99 to 1 vote and the House passed its version of the bill in June.  Both are expected to work out the differences in their two bills so they can vote on a final bill in the next two weeks.  

OurQuadCities.com The Wave's extra meaning for new father, Dalton Ferguson. OurQuadCities.com

The Wave's extra meaning for new father, Dalton Ferguson.

Every Saturday at Kinnick Stadium has become so much more personal for Iowa's Dalton Ferguson over the course of the season.Ferguson's girlfriend gave birth to twin girls five weeks premature. They were immediately admitted to Iowa's Stead Family Children Hospital. Ferguson's new fatherhood has completely changed "The Wave" for him at Kinnick Stadium. "My kids were up there," said Ferguson. "My girlfriend was up there and it was just one of those moments that I'll never be able to recreate, but it was something that will stay in my mind forever."Ferguson will be getting a chance to participate in "The Wave" on September 22 as Iowa hosts Wisconsin at 7:30.    

OurQuadCities.com Mayors from all around the Mississippi River team-up to combat plastic OurQuadCities.com

Mayors from all around the Mississippi River team-up to combat plastic

Dozens of mayors from the Greater Mississippi area gathered today in Davenport for the Mississippi River Cities and Town Initiative.The initiative is centered around the plastic waste footprint of the Mississippi River. All 30 mayors pledged to reduce about  20% of the plastic waste in the river by the year 2020.  The river not only provides drinking water for more than 20 million people but also is responsible for transporting 40% of the nation's agriculture output. Mayors from all sides agreed that completing this initiative will take efforts from all states surrounding the mighty river.   

WQAD.com Liggins trial continues after jurors don’t reach verdict WQAD.com

Liggins trial continues after jurors don’t reach verdict

WATERLOO, Iowa - A jury of six-men and six-women will return to deliberations in the morning, after no verdict was made, to decide the guilt of accused child murderer, Stanley Liggins. This is Liggins’ third trial for the murder of nine-year-old, Jennifer Lewis.  Liggins, age 56, was on trial for the same case in 1990. He was charged with first-degree murder.  The case was overturned twice since the investigation began on September 17th, 1990. The state and defense gave their closing statements at the Blackhawk County courthouse this morning.  The state provided detailed evidence for their closing statement, which was then followed by the defense.  The state then gave a rebuttal. Jennifer Lewis’ mother, Sheri McCormick, was present and attempted to hold back tears after images of her daughter were put on screen. This is the fourth week of the trial.  The jury will continue deliberations in the morning at 9a.m.

Quad-City Times 21 years later, Quad-Cities Marathon had made miles of memories Quad-City Times

21 years later, Quad-Cities Marathon had made miles of memories

Joe Moreno was 14 when a couple of older guys knocked on the door of his family’s East Moline home and asked if they could mentor him.

WQAD.com House set on fire aimed to be diversion from Kewanee gas station burglary, investigators say WQAD.com

House set on fire aimed to be diversion from Kewanee gas station burglary, investigators say

KEWANEE, Illinois — Three people facing burglary charges were also charged with arson, accused of setting a house on fire before committing a burglary at a gas station. Two adults, 19-year-old John T. Sterling and 28-year-old Shawna M. Jeanguenat, and a 16-year-old boy were charged in connection to a burglary at JoJo’s Gas Station on North Main Street in Kewanee, according to a statement from the Kewanee Police Department. Police said early on Tuesday, September 18, authorities were called to a house on fire in the 300 block of 5th Avenue.   While first responders were on their way to the fire, officers were called to a burglary happening at the gas station. When they arrived to the gas station, police said officers saw 19-year-old John T. Sterling fleeing the scene and arrested him.  Police said they also arrested Jeanguenat and the 16-year-old for their roles in the burglary. Both Sterling and Jeanguenat were taken to the Henry County Jail; the 16-year-old was released to a guardian. Sterling was being held on $150k bond.  Jeanguenat was held on $50,000 bond. All three were also charged with arson.  Police said the house that was on fire belonged to one of Sterling’s family members. “It was later determined that the house was set on fire to cause a diversion during the burglary,” According to the police statement, detectives also tied Sterling and the 16-year-old to a rash of burglaries over the last six weeks.  The burglaries happened at the following Kewanee businesses: Patty’s Barber Shop, Center City, Northeast Park, Dairy Queen, the Red Apple, the Station House, Cernovich’s Scrap Yard and JoJo’s Gas Station. The 16-year-old was charged with eight counts of burglary, eight counts of theft and arson. Sterling was charged with eight counts of burglary, six counts of theft, arson, possession of burglary tools, criminal damage to property, and resisting a peace officer.   He was also facing drug charges from late August, filed in connection to the burglary investigation. Jeanguenat was formally charged with burglary, arson, and theft. Sterling and Jeanguenat were expected to be in Henry County court on October 1.

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Man accused of killing ISU student had lengthy criminal history

TV9 has gone through court documents from 15 court cases involving Collin Richards dating back to 2014, many of them connected to violent crimes.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Scott County debates technology to record meetings

The Scott County Board of Supervisors was split Tuesday over how sophisticated a system it should purchase for recording its board meetings to ultimately post online for public view.

WQAD.com Social Security number phone scam resurfacing in the Quad Cities WQAD.com

Social Security number phone scam resurfacing in the Quad Cities

MOLINE, Illinois  -- A Milan woman said she was nearly duped by a scam phone call because the caller knew her Social Security number.  The Quad City Better Business Bureau said it's part of a two-year-old phone scam that is resurfacing in the area. Trisha Brooks, from Milan, Illinois,  received a call Tuesday, September 18, while she was at work. The caller knew her Social Security number and demanded $1,800. The caller said she wrote a bad check and was going to be served papers if she didn't pay. "They told me I owed money from eight years ago," Brooks said. " They said I needed to be in court and they were going to serve me papers for fraud and theft of services." The call came from Chicago, Illinois and when the scammer said her Social Security number, Brooks was convinced it was a legitimate call. "My mind was just spinning," Brooks said. "I thought I was in big trouble, so I asked them if I could just pay it." That is when the scammers told her the dollar amount and Brooks saw the red flags. She knew that was off and told the scammers she needed a bill to be mailed to her, then she hung up. After the call, Brooks searched the numbers online and found nine pages of people who received calls just like her. The Quad Cities Better Business Bureau said that just because a caller knows your Social Security number, does not mean it is legitimate. "If somebody calls you and wants money over the phone and you don't know who they are, don't give them any money, " Better Business Bureau Director Sandra Bowden said. "I don't care how they threaten you, I don't care what they say to you, don't do it." The Better Business Bureau says that all legitimate businesses must provide billing and documents by mail and in writing. You can track popular scams in your area on the BBB Scam Tracker.  

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Former Director of Child Food Program Pleads Guilty to Defrauding USDA

A Silvis woman and former operations director for the Quad Cities Area Children’s Food Program has pled guilty to fraud and filing a false tax return.

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Davenport police seek Veterans Memorial Parkway aluminum panel thieves

Davenport police are seeking public assistance in identifying thieves who stole aluminum panels from the bridge in the 4600 block of Veterans Memorial Parkway.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Mississippi River mayors: Reduce plastic waste 20 percent by 2020

A coalition of mayors and leaders from along the Mississippi River is asking businesses to reduce plastic waste by 20 percent within the next two years, a request that comes amid growing environmental concerns over plastic pollution traveling through the…

WVIK She Stole from Child Food Programs WVIK

She Stole from Child Food Programs

A Silvis woman has admitted stealing more than half a million dollars from programs that feed needy children. Wednesday 66 year old Nora Steele pleaded guilty to federal charges of fraud and filing a false tax return.

WVIK Mississippi River Mayors Address Plastic Pollution & Tariffs WVIK

Mississippi River Mayors Address Plastic Pollution & Tariffs

Anyone who's ever helped clean up the Mississippi River can tell you plastic pollution is a big problem. Today in Davenport, the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative announced new efforts to reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in the river, the Gulf of Mexico, and oceans around the world.

WQAD.com Oreo to release cake-flavored cookie in celebration of Mickey Mouse’s 90th birthday WQAD.com

Oreo to release cake-flavored cookie in celebration of Mickey Mouse’s 90th birthday

Happy Birthday,  Mickey Mouse! Disney’s iconic mouse turns 90 this year and to celebrate, Disney has teamed up with Oreo for a special birthday treat. According to ABC News, Oreo is releasing limited-edition, birthday cake-flavored cookies to mark the 90th anniversary of Mickey Mouse. .@Disney and @Oreo are celebrating Mickey Mouse's 90th birthday with limited-edition BIRTHDAY CAKE-FLAVORED Oreos and our dreams are coming true! https://t.co/AM8HBYIm7e pic.twitter.com/CHF9O7G6f8 — Good Morning America (@GMA) September 19, 2018 There are reportedly three different Mickey-themed designs on the chocolate wafers themselves.  ABC News said these designs include a party horn, a big 90, and Mickey Mouse himself. These special, celebratory cookies will be available nationwide starting September 24, while supplies last.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Muscatine man stabbed during fight

A Muscatine man was arrested Wednesday after allegedly stabbing a man during a fight, according to a Muscatine Police Department news release.

WQAD.com Couple reunited with dog, Jeep stolen from hospital parking lot WQAD.com

Couple reunited with dog, Jeep stolen from hospital parking lot

TACOMA, Wash. — A Washington state couple whose Jeep was stolen from a Tacoma hospital parking lot – with their dog in the backseat – have been reunited with their dog and vehicle. Ivey, a 70-pound beagle lab mix, was in the backseat of a Jeep Cherokee when the vehicle was stolen from a Tacoma hospital parking lot. Ivey, a 70-pound beagle lab mix, was in the backseat of a Jeep Cherokee when the vehicle was stolen from a Tacoma hospital parking lot. (Courtesy: Samantha Worley) Samantha Worley said their white, 1991 Jeep was recovered Tuesday afternoon in a parking lot, less than 24 hours after it was stolen from MultiCare Allenmore Hospital’s parking lot. But Ivey, the 70-pound beagle/lab mix that was in the backseat when it was taken, was nowhere to be found. Worley suffered a severe panic attack at work Monday night and ended up in the emergency room after paramedics detected a slight sinus arrhythmia. Her husband, Richard, arrived at the hospital to check on her and left Ivey in the backseat. About an hour later, the Jeep — and Ivey — were gone. Worley and her husband, Richard, left a blanket in the parking lot where the Jeep was recovered on Tuesday afternoon. Wednesday morning, they went back to the same lot. There was Ivey, sitting near the blanket. Tacoma Police are investigating the theft. Anyone with information is asked to call Tacoma PD.

WQAD.com Former Quad City children’s food program director pleads guilty to fraud WQAD.com

Former Quad City children’s food program director pleads guilty to fraud

ROCK ISLAND, IL,- Wednesday 9-19-18, Nora L. Steele, waived indictment and plead guilty to defrauding the government of approximately $515,617, and filing a false tax return. Nora is the former operations director of the Quad Cities Area Children’s Food Program (QCACFP) from its beginnings in February 2016 until her and the company parted ways in June of 2017. Prior to the creation of the food program, Steele had a similar job since 2004 for, Church of Peace, in Rock Island. Steele, 66, of Silvis, Ill, pleaded guilty to fraud and filing a false tax return in her appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jonathan E. Hawley in Rock Island. Sentencing will not take place until Jan. 17, 2019 in Peoria. According to the press release: “In today’s hearing, and according to court documents, Steele admitted that from August 2015 to June 2017, she submitted falsely inflated meal count forms for reimbursement. In some cases additional meals that were not served were added to counts of legitimate meals that were served to children. In other cases, Steele submitted fraudulent meal count forms when no meals at all were served at a particular location on a given day.” In addition, Steele would fake mileage reimbursements. Steele consistently claimed to have driven about 1,500 miles per month for a reimbursement of approximately $840 for work-related travel that she did not actually make. From March 2016 through June 2017, Steele claimed work travel mileage reimbursement for more miles than the vehicles belonging to Steele and her husband had actually traveled. As a result of the fake mileage reimbursement claims, Steele received $15,059 in 2015 and $19,282 in 2016 that was not taxed or reported as income on Steele’s personal tax returns. Church of Peace and QCACFP provided summer and after-school meals to at-risk children throughout the Quad Cities area. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, reimbursed the program a set amount per meal served. On a monthly basis, QCACFP submitted requests for reimbursement to the State of Illinois, which in turn received funding from USDA to pay the reimbursement. Meals were provided in conjunction with after-school learning or care programming, typically at elementary or junior high schools and were operated by YMCA or Spring Forward Learning. Between 2015 and 2017, QCACFP provided meals to 35 to 50 sites in the Quad Cities and Galesburg, Ill., communities each month. At sentencing, the statutory maximum penalty for mail fraud is 20 years in prison. For filing a false tax return, the penalty is up to three years in prison.   For some background on what lead to this moment, follow the link here  

WQAD.com Mayors seek solutions for plastic pollution in Mississippi River WQAD.com

Mayors seek solutions for plastic pollution in Mississippi River

DAVENPORT - Mayors from 10 states are pledging to reduce plastic pollution in the Mississippi River some 20% by 2020. That promise coming as Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative wraps up its annual meeting on Wednesday, September 19. Local companies like Happy Joe's and Heart of America are taking a deep dive into plastic pollution. The pizza chain will be seeking new ways to package and serve its products. "We're looking from our straws to our silverware, to these million little plastic inserts that we put in our pizza boxes," said Marketing Director Kristel Ersan.  "We're reviewing it all." The Mississippi River is a crucial transportation corridor for moving grain and goods.  But plastic pollution is worsening along its path to the Gulf of Mexico. Meeting participants like Mississippi State Representative Abe Hudson say that 80% of the plastic pollution traces back to inland sources. "Plastic pollution is a global issue," he said.  "It is our hope that we can identify local solutions." More than two dozen mayors from Minnesota to Louisiana are aiming to increase education and awareness at local, state and national levels. "You can get things done collectively much better, much more efficiently and much quicker than we can acting alone," said Bettendorf Mayor Bob Gallagher. Hope that community collaborations can deliver a big message about plastic pollution. "From soap in our hotel bathrooms to fliers and inserts we put in our restaurants, we are committed to reducing that by 20% in 2020," said Michelle Sparkman, Heart of America. They're stepping up for a cleaner waterway all along the Mississippi River.

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Iowa high court hears arguments in police stop case

The Iowa Supreme Court will determine whether the police practice of using minor infractions as a pretext for stopping drivers they suspect of more serious crimes violates the Iowa Constitution in a case that civil liberty groups say has implications for police racial profiling.

WQAD.com Baked before boiled: Maine restaurant treats lobsters with marijuana to ease pain before cooking WQAD.com

Baked before boiled: Maine restaurant treats lobsters with marijuana to ease pain before cooking

SOUTHWEST HARBOR, Maine — A Maine lobster pound is experimenting with getting lobsters high off marijuana smoke before killing and cooking them, believing it is “more humane.” In an experiment, Charlotte Gill owner of Charlotte’s Legendary Lobster Pound, put a lobster into a box with a few inches of water and then marijuana smoke was blown into the box, WMTW reports. Gill, who is a licensed medical marijuana caregiver in the state of Maine, claimed that the lobster was calmer for the next three weeks and that she even released it back into the ocean. “I feel bad that when lobsters come here there is no exit strategy,” Gill told the Mount Desert Islander. “It’s a unique place and you get to do such unique things but at the expense of this little creature. I’ve really been trying to figure out how to make it better.” Gill said it’s impossible for a human to become high off a marijuana-sedated lobster. “THC breaks down completely by 392 degrees, therefore we will use both steam as well as a heat process that will expose the meat to 420 degree extended temperature, in order to ensure there is no possibility of carryover effect (even though the likelihood of such would be literally impossible),” she told the Islander.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Humility Homes and Services hosts open house

Humility Homes and Services, Inc. will observe a decade of providing housing services with an open house at its homeless shelter Friday, Sept. 21.

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'Sesame Street' wants to clarify: Bert and Ernie aren't gay

The producers of "Sesame Street" want you to know that Bert and Ernie are not, in fact, gay.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Moline Police captains on leave to return to work Thursday

The two Moline police captains placed on leave after the chief was charged with drunken driving will return to work Thursday.

WVIK Vote Security in RI County WVIK

Vote Security in RI County

With early voting about to start for the November election, residents of Rock Island County should be worried about the security of their votes. That was the message Wednesday from Russell Christ, republican candidate for county clerk.

WQAD.com Crash blocks Iowa-bound traffic on I-74 Bridge WQAD.com

Crash blocks Iowa-bound traffic on I-74 Bridge

Iowa-bound traffic on Interstate 74 is blocked due to a crash. Traffic is completely stopped from the foot of the bridge back beyond 12th Avenue.  According to the Iowa Department of Transportation, the crash was between the bridge and the Grant Street/State Street Exit. Click here for traffic information, anytime. Stay with WQAD News 8 for updates

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The Latest: Wisconsin workplace shooter dead, shot by police

The attack that occurred Wednesday morning at software company in Middleton.

WQAD.com Mom makes fifth-grade son wear ‘I am a bully’ shirt to school as punishment WQAD.com

Mom makes fifth-grade son wear ‘I am a bully’ shirt to school as punishment

SPLENDORA, Texas - A mother made her son wear a shirt that read “I am a bully” to school after she heard he had been bullying kids. Star, who only wanted to be referred to by her first name, had him wear the shirt Friday to Greenleaf Elementary, KTRK reported. "I'm a very old-school parent," she said. "I don't coddle my children. I don't sugar coat the world to them." The mother said she had heard that her fifth-grade son had been calling other students “stupid” and “idiots.” She posted images of her son wearing the shirt to Facebook but eventually removed the post after negative feedback. Star said she spoke with the school about making her son wear the shirt and they supported her decision. The school released a statement to KTRK that said parents have the right to make such decisions and a counselor checked on the student throughout the day. "He'll survive. And he's already been treating his sisters better. He's already been treating his cousins better. He learned from it. That's all that matters," said Star.

WQAD.com Prank calls claiming tigers escaped zoo frightens residents and businesses WQAD.com

Prank calls claiming tigers escaped zoo frightens residents and businesses

SEATTLE, Wash. - Residents and businesses around a Seattle zoo can rest easy after learning a scary phone call they received was a prank, according to KCPQ. On Sunday, a robocall dialed multiple homes and restaurants near the Woodland Park Zoo, telling people to be on the lookout for a tiger that had escaped the zoo. The prank seemed very real because the caller used the same phone number as the Woodland Park Zoo, officials said. But it was definitely a prank. "Woodland Park Zoo was recently notified that a local establishment received a phone call falsely appearing to be from the zoo and claiming that a tiger had escaped," zoo officials said. "Our staff immediately determined that our tigers were secure and the report to be false." Officials believe the prank was a case of "neighbor spoofing." According to the Better Business Bureau, con artists and robocallers are using technology to modify what numbers appear on a caller ID. It allows pranksters and scammers to impersonate a business, and exploit it to their advantage. In this case, it was to frighten people into believing a tiger was on the loose in north Seattle, officials said. Zoo officials say the zoo has an extensive contingency plan in the event that an animal escapes, and it does not involve robocalls. "Woodland Park Zoo has a comprehensive plan for emergencies," officials said. "Animals are kept under 24-hour care and surveillance and our highly-trained emergency response team is prepared to deploy if needed." Zoo officials reported the robocalls to police. In the more than 100 year history of the zoo, a tiger has never escaped.  

Quad-City Times #HipHopMeetsIndia: Quad-City Arts Visiting Artist Series kicks off its 45th season Quad-City Times

#HipHopMeetsIndia: Quad-City Arts Visiting Artist Series kicks off its 45th season

Walking into the gymnasium about an hour before school let out for the day, a Edison Jr. High School student turned to his friend and said, "I hate assemblies. I just want to go home."

WQAD.com ‘Keep the car’: Couple heartbroken after jeep with dog in backseat stolen from hospital WQAD.com

‘Keep the car’: Couple heartbroken after jeep with dog in backseat stolen from hospital

TACOMA, Wash. - Going to the hospital is stressful enough, but a Monday night trip to the ER quickly turned into a nightmare for one couple whose Jeep was stolen from the hospital parking lot - with their dog in the backseat. Samantha Worley suffered a severe panic attack at work Monday night. Paramedics who responded told her an EKG showed a slight sinus arrhythmia that wouldn't go away. That's when Worley agreed to go to the MultiCare Allenmore Hospital emergency room for more tests. Her husband, Richard, arrived at the hospital a short time later and left their dog Ivey, a 70-pound beagle/lab mix, in the backseat. While her husband was inside the hospital with Worley, someone stole their white, 1991 Jeep Cherokee, along with Ivey. "Keep the car," a tearful Worley told KCPQ. "If they still have her in the car, all I want is for them to take her somewhere. I don’t care what they do with the car at this point. The only reason I’m posting the car on social media is in case she’s still in the car." Worley's Jeep Cherokee was found about 10 p.m. in the 500 block of E. Wright, Tacoma police said. There was no sign of Ivey in the SUV. Ivey is brown with a black snout and was wearing a pink and white collar when she was stolen. She is about 5 years old and microchipped. Worley said Ivey was her mother's dog and has been living with Worley and her husband for the past two years. She's a timid dog, Worley said, but she's sweet and doesn't bite. If anyone sees Ivey roaming the area, Worley urges them not to chase her, but to try calling Ivey over to them instead. Tacoma Police confirmed they are investigating. Anyone with information on the stolen Jeep or the missing dog is asked to call Tacoma PD.

WQAD.com Boy helps save school bus driver’s life WQAD.com

Boy helps save school bus driver’s life

TOLLAND, Conn. -  Sixth grader Will Restall was in the right place at the right time. While riding the bus to Tolland Middle School Monday morning, Will found himself in an emergency situation and stepped up to help. “I received a phone call from William’s principal," Tara Restall, Will’s mother, told WTIC. "She wanted to let me know that there had been a medical emergency with the bus driver.” "When we got to school, she parked and then fell over," said Will, "So I grabbed the microphone, and said that she had a medical emergency and she needed medical attention." “He’s pretty young, he’s only in the sixth grade, and he’s only been on the bus for three weeks now. He knew what needed to be done and he did it," Tara said, "The principal actually called him a hero. He really is, he helped save his driver." Most kids and parents dread a call from the school principal, but for this young Tolland hero, it made for very proud parents.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Two Moline captains off paid leave, returning to work amid police chief’s OWI investigation

MOLINE, Illinois — Two captains with the Moline Police Department were expected to come back to work after being placed on paid leave. Captain Trevor Fisk and Captain Brian Johnson were coming back to work Thursday, September 20, just under two weeks after Police Chief John Hitchcock was cited for an OWI on Highway 61.  The two captains were in the truck with Chief Hitchcock when he was pulled over, according to a statement from City Administrator Doug Maxeiner.  Neither captain was charged in the incident. In a previous statement from Maxeiner, he said placing them on leave “was done out of an abundance of caution to make sure there were no improprieties during or after the traffic stop.” Related: Dashcam video shows traffic stop that led to Moline police chief’s OWI citation In a statement on Wednesday, September 19, Maxeiner said it’s still possible that the two captains will face disciplinary action. “If disciplinary action is determined to be warranted, it is anticipated that such discipline will be issued by October 1,” he said. Chief Hitchcock has been placed on paid administrative leave.  Lt. Dave Gass will continue serving as Acting Chief as the investigation continues.

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Captains riding with Moline police chief during OWI citation back on job

Chief Hitchcock remains on leave

WQAD.com Thunderstorm chances in the forecast before autumn air spills in this weekend WQAD.com

Thunderstorm chances in the forecast before autumn air spills in this weekend

A cluster of showers and thunderstorms continue to ride along a boundary, which is positioned near the I 80 corridor.  This means that the best coverage will take place in areas along and north of the corridor.  Severe weather looks limited but a good rush of wind or hail are potentially the main threats.  This event will end by evening before skies become quiet the rest of the night. The main headline for your Thursday will the high heat and wind.  Temperatures are on track to climb into the lower 90s with heat index values approaching 100 degrees in spots.  Winds could exceed over 30 mph in spots. A broken line of showers and storms are also on track to arrive late Thursday night before the last of the raindrops end before dawn on Friday. That will lead to a dry, refreshing touch of autumn weather with highs between 70 and 75 degrees and overnight lows in the upper 40s. Chief meteorologist James Zahara Download the News 8 Weather App — for iOS, click here and for Android, click here Download the free News 8 App — for iOS, click here and for Android, click here

WVIK 'Talking Art' With Naim Bouchareb Of Iowa Oriental Rug Company And Renaissance Antiques WVIK

'Talking Art' With Naim Bouchareb Of Iowa Oriental Rug Company And Renaissance Antiques

The Iowa Oriental Rug Company and Renaissance Antiques , owned by Naim Bouchareb, is located in Davenport. The decorative arts are well represented here, where you will find a large selection of new and used oriental rugs in addition to high end antiques, including Tiffany glass, sterling, and porcelain.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

NWS issues special weather statement

The National Weather Service has issued a Special Weather Statement that includes Louisa and Muscatine counties in Iowa.

Quad-City Times Noon update: Rain likely this afternoon Quad-City Times

Noon update: Rain likely this afternoon

Here's the afternoon forecast from the National Weather Service.

WQAD.com Farmhand pleads not guilty in stabbing death of Mollie Tibbetts WQAD.com

Farmhand pleads not guilty in stabbing death of Mollie Tibbetts

MONTEZUMA, Iowa (AP) — The farmhand charged in the abduction and stabbing death of 20-year-old Mollie Tibbetts in Iowa has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder. Cristhian Bahena Rivera entered his plea Wednesday at the Poweshiek County Courthouse in Montezuma, Iowa. Rivera is charged in the killing of Tibbetts, a University of Iowa student who disappeared while out for a run July 18 in Brooklyn, Iowa. Investigators recovered her body a month later in a cornfield. A medical examiner has said Tibbetts was stabbed to death. Rivera is a Mexican national who has been accused of being in the country illegally. The 24-year-old worked at a dairy farm a few miles from where Tibbetts disappeared. He waived his right to be tried within 90 days. Trial is set for April 16.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Active shooter reported at business in Madison suburb

Police are responding to a report of an active shooter at a commercial building in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin.

WQAD.com Sen. Durbin hears concerns about Amtrack’s potential to leave Galesburg WQAD.com

Sen. Durbin hears concerns about Amtrack’s potential to leave Galesburg

GALESBURG, Illinois- City leaders in Galesburg opened up to Senator Dick Durbin on Sept. 19, during a meeting at city hall, about growing concerns regarding Amtrack and a budget proposal from the Trump administration. The administration is calling for cutbacks on long-distance train services in the country, including the service from Galesburg to Chicago. The mayor of Galesburg, John Pritchard, said he is concerned that the move would impact the local economy, and leave many residents and Amtrack customers frustrated. The city of Galesburg has eight trains that stop in town everyday, bringing people from all over the country through the city. “The signals we have been receiving are not encouraging because when it comes to long distance service, (the Trump administration has) been talking about some pretty serious cutbacks,” Durbin told WQAD News 8. “We will be working to come up with something on the congressional side that we hope can be more helpful to the communities served.” But even with that being said, Mayor Pritchard still has concerns. “We are concerned that if that doesn’t happen, I think that the intention is, that by the end of the year, Amtrack if it were operating on it’s schedule, would not run the train the full distance of the route.” If the budget cutbacks are approved, Amtrack trains would no longer operate out of Galesburg after December 31, 2018.

WQAD.com Watch Live: Craig Hignight answers your plant and garden questions WQAD.com

Watch Live: Craig Hignight answers your plant and garden questions

Can’t see the live stream? Tap here. Craig Hignight, plant and garden expert, is here to answer your questions live on News 8 at 11. Click here to join in the conversation and submit a question.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Federal Reserve economist to speak at Dewitt summit

A senior economist and adviser of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, William Strauss, will speak at an Economic Summit in DeWitt next week.

WVIK Quad City Botanical Center Looks To Expand WVIK

Quad City Botanical Center Looks To Expand

The Quad City Botanical Center is expanding, and is asking people to help decide what to do next.

Quad-City Times Chicago man makes first court appearance in death of 5-year-old in Davenport Quad-City Times

Chicago man makes first court appearance in death of 5-year-old in Davenport

A Chicago man charged in the death of 5-year-old Ja'Shawn Bussell in Davenport made his first court appearance in Scott County District Court Wednesday morning.

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Arrests made in Tuesday's shots fired call in Davenport

Davenport Police arrest three teens in connection with a shots fired call from Tuesday afternoon.

WQAD.com Shots fired report leads to arrest of 3 Davenport teens; recovery of stolen firearm WQAD.com

Shots fired report leads to arrest of 3 Davenport teens; recovery of stolen firearm

DAVENPORT, Iowa — Three teenage boys from Davenport were charged in connection to a shots fired incident. The three teens, ages 14, 15 and 16, were arrested and held in a juvenile detention center, according to a statement from the Davenport Police Department. Police said they were called to a report of shots fired around 2:25 p.m. Tuesday, September 18.  Officers found shell casings in the middle of the road near 13th Street and Harrison Street, where the gunfire was reported. Investigators recovered a firearm that had been reported stolen out of Bettendorf in May of 2018. There were no injuries reported in the incident. The teens are facing a series of charges: The 14-year-old is charged with interference with a weapon, possession of stolen property, possession of controlled substance and carrying weapons The 15-year-old is charged with felon in possession of a firearm and intimidation with a dangerous weapon The 16-year-old is charged with possession of a controlled substance, intimidation with a dangerous weapon, carrying weapons and third-degree theft.

Quad-City Times Update: Police arrest 3 juveniles in shots fired incident in Hilltop neighborhood Quad-City Times

Update: Police arrest 3 juveniles in shots fired incident in Hilltop neighborhood

Three juveniles face charges in a shots-fired incident Tuesday afternoon in Davenport's Hilltop neighborhood.

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LIVE: Arraignment for the murder suspect of Mollie Tibbetts

The man accused of killing Mollie Tibbetts will be arraigned on murder charges at Poweshiek County District Court in Montezuma, Iowa.

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WATCH LIVE: Arraignment for suspect in murder of Mollie Tibbetts

Mollie Tibbetts disappeared while out jogging in her hometown of Brooklyn, Iowa on July 18, 2018. About a month later, her body was found in a cornfield.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

Watch Live: Closing arguments in Stanley Liggins trial

Can’t see the live stream? Tap here WATERLOO, Iowa — Closing statements are expected this morning in the Stanley Liggins trial, nearly a month after testimony began. Liggins was accused of first-degree murder in the 1990 murder of nine-year-old Jennifer Lewis. The child’s body was found near a Davenport elementary school, in a garbage bag that had been set on fire. Liggins was convicted of the crime twice; first in a 1993 trial in Scott County and a 1995 in Dubuque County.  Both convictions were overturned. Click here for full coverage on the Stanley Liggins case.

Quad-City Times Government Bridge to close Saturday for lock repairs Quad-City Times

Government Bridge to close Saturday for lock repairs

Arsenal Island officials report the Government Bridge between Arsenal Island and Davenport will be closed to pedestrian, vehicle and rail traffic from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday.

WQAD.com Government Bridge closed Saturday WQAD.com

Government Bridge closed Saturday

The Government Bridge was set to close on Saturday, September 22 for repairs. The bridge was expected to be closed to pedestrian, vehicular and rail traffic from 7:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. The Corps of Engineers were making repairs to the lock for barge traffic. The closure will not affect the Quad City Marathon race.

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Fall Like Temps Next Week

While we will usher in fall with normal temps in the 70s this weekend, it will really feel like fall by Wednesday and Thursday of next week.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Scott County Republicans host Ronald Reagan Dinner

The Scott County Republican Party will hold its 10th Annual Ronald Reagan Dinner on Tuesday, Oct. 16, at the Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, Bettendorf.

WQAD.com WQAD says goodbye to a community leader, friend WQAD.com

WQAD says goodbye to a community leader, friend

This morning we take a moment to remember a very important person in the Quad City community. Thea Hansen-Bettis has passed away. For years, she was known for her work at TPQC (The Project of the Quad Cities). Her skills allowed her to unite our community for a great cause. Her job became her life, spending years connecting people at risk of HIV-AIDS with testing and treatment and helping youth in the LGBTQ community understand that they are cared for and loved, even when suicide seemed like the only option. She was skilled as a coordinator of the Quad City Red Ribbon Dinner, telling WQAD News 8 in 2016, “It’s a coming together of people from all walks of life, socioeconomic backgrounds who have been impacted or just care about people living with this disease.” Last year, she reached out to WQAD News 8, asking if we would partner with TPQC in their efforts. We wholeheartedly said yes and helped her make this year's benefit the biggest ever. Many of us at WQAD formed friendships with Thea and will miss her so much. As the community mourns the passing of Thea, we are thinking most of Thea's husband Chad, her family, and all of the Quad Citizens who loved her. Funeral services will be held at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday September 23rd at Trinity Lutheran Church in Moline.

WQAD.com WQAD.com

IEMA: Make sure donations go to reputable hurricane disaster recovery groups

SPRINGFIELD (Illinois News Network) — Make sure that you make a difference. That’s the advice from Illinois’ emergency managers as people look to help in the aftermath of now-Tropical Storm Florence. Whether you are donating money or your time, the Illinois Emergency Management Agency says it’s important to give to reputable charities and aid organizations. IEMA’s Rebecca Clark says a lot of people are going to want to help now that Florence has moved through parts of North Carolina. “It’s really important that people who are looking to help make sure they find a reputable organization, to make a difference,” Clark said. Clark said that a number of organizations in Illinois need volunteers to help as they send aid to the Carolinas and other states impacted by Florence. “One place that we like to send people is the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster [organization],” Clark said. “It maintains a database of volunteer and charity organizations that are involved in a number of ways.” As always, there will be some scammers looking to take advantage of the storm. Clark said Ready.Illinois.Gov also has a list of reputable charities that people can trust.

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Pres. Trump to visit the Carolinas today to view damage

The White House said President Donald Trump will visit North Carolina on Wednesday to see the damage.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

Judge allows Iowa to join states halting clean water rule

The rule, supported by environmental groups, provides a definition for which rivers, lakes and other water bodies may be regulated by federal agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency.

KWQC TV-6 KWQC TV-6

So-called 'Drug Llama' accused of fentanyl trafficking in Illinois

Officials say the conspiracy included the shipment of more than 50,000 fentanyl pills nationwide.

WQAD.com Man arrested for ‘yanking’ dog leash he used to control wife with dementia at fair: police WQAD.com

Man arrested for ‘yanking’ dog leash he used to control wife with dementia at fair: police

YORK, Pa. — A 66-year-old man who told police he used a dog leash at a Pennsylvania fair to keep track of his wife, who has dementia, was arrested after he allegedly yanked hard enough to leave red marks around her throat, according to WPMT. Walter William Wolford, of Hagerstown, Maryland, was arrested Saturday and charged with one count of assault after a witness at the York Fair saw the alleged abuse and contacted police. The witness told police she saw Wolford, who was holding an 8-foot nylon leash attached to the woman’s neck, yank the leash until all the slack had gone out of it, causing the victim’s head to move backwards. Police took Wolford to the West Manchester Township Police Station for questioning. The arresting officer noted that the victim was in a “very disoriented” state. Wolford told police his wife was suffering from advanced-stage dementia, according to charging documents, and that she had wandered off at last year’s fair and became lost for over an hour. He told police that this year he felt his wife should have some form of restraint to prevent her from getting lost and came up with the leash idea, according to the documents. Wolford said he originally had the leash around his wife’s waist, but it worked its way up to her neck. When she walked away, Wolford said, he “gently tugged at the leash so she would stop.” Wolford’s son and daughter-in-law, who were also attending the fair, told police that Wolford was not abusive. Police charged Wolford with simple assault after consulting with the York County District Attorney’s Office and the York Area Agency on Aging. Wolford’s son took the victim into custody while Wolford was arraigned and processed, police say.

WVIK Two African-American Jurors Disappear From Stanley Liggins Retrial WVIK

Two African-American Jurors Disappear From Stanley Liggins Retrial

Two members of the jury in the murder retrial of Stanley Liggins were absent Tuesday from the courtroom in the Black Hawk County Courthouse in Waterloo, Iowa, where attorneys for Liggins rested their case. Both missing jurors are African-American. Liggins, who is black, is charged with the murder of Jennifer Lewis, who was nine years old when her charred remains were found in a field near Jefferson Elementary School in Davenport on Sept. 17, 1990. The current trial is Liggins' third, after two previous trials resulted in convictions that were eventually overturned by state courts. Both the 1993 and 1995 trials of Liggins featured all-white juries. The current trial's 15-member panel of 12 jurors and three alternates had included three African-Americans until Tuesday's proceedings. The court does not announce which of the 15 members serve on the 12-person jury, but a source close to jury selection told WVIK that all three of the African-American members were designated as jurors. Judge

Quad-City Times Rick's Six: More showers, volleyball milestone, shots fired in Hilltop area, and foodie events coming up Quad-City Times

Rick's Six: More showers, volleyball milestone, shots fired in Hilltop area, and foodie events coming up

A good Wednesday to all. The National Weather Service says we could see some patchy, dense fog during the morning commute. So be alert to changing visibilities.

WQAD.com What’s Cooking with Ruthie’s: Crab Salad and Pate Choux Profiteroles and Lemon Aioli WQAD.com

What’s Cooking with Ruthie’s: Crab Salad and Pate Choux Profiteroles and Lemon Aioli

DAVENPORT- Chef Peter Sedlak from Ruthie’s Steak & Seafood came on Good Morning Quad Cities Wednesday, September 19 to show us how to make Crab Salad and Pate Choux Profiteroles and Lemon Aioli. To find out how to make each, see the instructions below: Crab Salad Profiteroles 6 ea. Profiteroles (Cream Puffs) 3/4 cup Lemon Aioli 1# Jumbo Lump Crabmeat ½ cup Fine Julienne Iceberg Lettuce 6 Table Spoons Tobiko (Flying Fish Roe) Lemon Aioli 1 Large egg yolk, at room temperature 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 Teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 Tablespoon Lemon Zest ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon cold water ¾ cup canola oil In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolk, lemon juice, mustard, salt and 1 teaspoon cold water until frothy. Whisking constantly, slowly dribble in the oil until mayonnaise is thick and oil is incorporated. Finish with lemon zest. Pate Choux for Profiteroles 1 1/2 cups water 1 stick plus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into cubes 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 8 large eggs Preheat the oven to 400°. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.

WQAD.com Ag in the Classroom: Did you know apples help make sugar? WQAD.com

Ag in the Classroom: Did you know apples help make sugar?

MOLINE-  DeAnne Bloomberg, Manager of the Rock Island County Farm Bureau, will join us Wednesday, September 19 to show us a lesson on the importance of apples. According to AgintheClassroom.org,   here are the instructions for the activity called, ‘Apple Chemistry,’ which is designed for students grades fourth through sixth. What You Will Need: • Several apples at different levels of ripeness (Preferably the same variety) • Pastry Brush • Knife and cutting board • Iodine Apples contain starch which naturally converts to sugar as the apple ripens. This process starts near the core of the apple and moves toward the skin. An apple is considered ripe when most of the starch has turned into sugar. Iodine will appear dark purple in the presence of starch. If you apply iodine to an apple that has ripened, it will not appear to be very purple as most of the starch is now sugar. However, an unripe apple will stain heavily purple, meaning there is much more starch present. Directions: 1. Label the apples (Apple “A,” Apple “B,”…etc.) and have the students make observations about the color, texture, firmness, and size of each sample. This may be easiest in a chart format. 2. Cut the apples in half (transversely) and separate the top half from the bottom half. 3. Observe all the apple halves while taking care to remember which halves go together. 4. Using the pastry brush, wipe iodine across the cut surface of the bottom half of each apple. Let the apples sit for 1-2 minutes. 5. The cut surface of the apples will begin to change color depending on the levels of starch. 6. Make final observations and conclusions in an explanatory paragraph.

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Shower & Storm Chances Again Today

A strong storm or two can't be ruled out and storms could approach the QC by midday.

Quad-City Times Quad-City Times

Births for Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018

UNITYPOINT HEALTH-TRINITY MOLINE

Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

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Route 84 through Port Byron to close for $3 Million Project

A three-million-dollar project is set to close Route 84 through Port Byron until October 24th as crews install new water mains.

OurQuadCities.com Do you have housing issues? QC leaders are asking you to speak up OurQuadCities.com

Do you have housing issues? QC leaders are asking you to speak up

A group of Quad Cities leaders are asking neighbors to speak up about their housing problems. The cities of Rock Island, Davenport and Moline are teaming up to conduct a study about fair housing. The study is required by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department every five years. This year, three of the Quad Cities are holding three joint meetings. City officials are calling on neighbors to help pinpoint problems and obstacles when it comes to housing-- from trying to find affordable housing to facing housing discrimination. An outside company, Mosaic, will gather the results of the public input meetings and compile a report scheduled to be published in the spring.City officials then hope to ask neighbors which projects are most needed and where. Projects could include "Rehabbing houses, developing houses, bringing in new development," says Colleen Small-Vollman, Rock Island Budget & Grant Manager. The first was held Tuesday at Greater Antioch Church on 14th Street in Rock Island. You can find the next two meeting times and locations by clicking here. You can also fill out a survey online to share your experiences of hurdles when it comes to finding an affordable home. That survey is available here. If you'd like to share your housing hurdles with Local 4 News, you can send an email to Local 4's Tahera Rahman at TRahman@whbf.com. 

WQAD.com Opioid Crisis Response Act moves through U.S. Congress WQAD.com

Opioid Crisis Response Act moves through U.S. Congress

ROCK ISLAND, Illinois-- William Rogers is a medical doctor in the Quad Cities and a part time detective in Ohio. He says he’s seen both sides of the country’s opioid epidemic. “I do pharmaceutical diversion investigations which includes everything from prescribers to pharmacist to paramedics,” says Detective Rogers. He says over the last two years more people died of opioid related deaths than in the Vietnam War. “We’ve exceeded that each year for two years,” says Rogers. This week the U.S Senate passed a bill called the Opioid Crisis Response Act. If signed into law, it allows doctors and law enforcement to track opioid prescriptions. It encourages physicians to look into other ways to treat pain for people on Medicare and it supports research for children exposed to opioids. “It’s a move in the right direction I voted for it we all did but I hope we learn our lesson that this is not the end of the story,” says Senator Dick Durbin. Congress plans for a final vote on an opioid bill in the next two weeks. The goal is to have it ready for the president to sign early next month.

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Iowa, Illinois receive funds to Support State Parks and Outdoor Recreation

Secretary of the Interior Ryan K. Zinke today announced fund distribution from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) to Iowa and Illinois for state-identified outdoor recreation and conservation projects.

OurQuadCities.com 'Harvest Hurrah' at Wide River Winery with autumn wines OurQuadCities.com

'Harvest Hurrah' at Wide River Winery with autumn wines

The people at Wide River Winery want you to join them this weekend to toast the harvest. The Quad Cities winery just finished harvesting grapes at its vineyard in Clinton.Liz Quinn from the winery is here with some of the fall wines available and some upcoming events.